Aero Precision - Premier C130 Aftermarket Support
Aero Precision - Premier C130 Aftermarket Support
Aero Precision - Premier C130 Aftermarket Support
 

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  1. Today
  2. Happy Birthday Bill ( billurquhart )
  3. A man and his wife, moved back home to North Carolina, from Texas. The wife had a wooden leg and to insure it in Texas Was $2000.00 a year! When they arrived in North Carolina, they went to an insurance Agency, to see how much it would cost to insure the leg. The agent looked it up on the computer and said to the couple, '$39.00.' The husband was shocked and asked why it was so cheap here In North Carolina to insure, because it cost him $2000.00 in Texas! The agent turned his computer screen to the couple and said, 'Well, here it is on the screen, it says: *Any wooden structure, with a sprinkler system over it, is $39.00.
  4. Yesterday
  5. At a wedding ceremony, the pastor asked if anyone had anything to say concerning the union of the bride and groom. It was their time to stand up and talk, or forever hold their peace. The moment of utter silence was broken by a young beautiful woman carrying an infant. She started walking toward the pastor slowly. Everything quickly turned to chaos. The bride slapped the groom. The groom's mother fainted. The groomsmen started giving each other looks and wondering how best to help save the situation. The pastor asked the woman, "Can you tell us why you came forward? What do you have to say?" The woman replied, "We can't hear in the back."
  6. I don't know currently, been in theater lately. I heard it's been chilly there.
  7. Last week
  8. Can anyone tell me why our USAF H1's are wired so that you can only see the SCNS mode advisory lights if you turn the nav instrument lighting rheostat up? It turns out that these lights are wired into the dimmer rheostat. So if you were flying during daylight, and you wanted to see the SCNS status lights, you'd have to turn the instrument lights on. This seems wrong to me, especially since the pilot/copilot advisory lights are not wired this way.
  9. Interesting numbers as of last month Oldest USAF Herk in years 64-14852 HC-130P at Patrick Hi time USAF Herk 65-0989 EC-130H at DM 28385 hours Oldest H in years 74-1659 at Yokota (about 24256 Hours) Hi time H 74-2067 at Yokota 25997 I really don't understand why these H models with new wings are going right to the scrap areas at AMARG, when the E models are in storage. Just this month 85-0038 and 0042 went to AMARG. Seems like they would be primo for Foreign Military Sales. Maybe Lockheed wants to sell J's to countries that can't afford them. Bob
  10. A blonde calls her boyfriend and says, "Please come over here and help me. I have this killer jigsaw puzzle, and I can't figure out how to get it started". Her boyfriend asks, "What is it supposed to be when it's finished?" The blonde says, "According to the picture on the box, it's a tiger." Her boyfriend decides to go over and help with the puzzle. She lets him in and shows him to where she has the puzzle spread all over the table. He studies the pieces for a moment, then looks at the box, then turns to her and says, "First of all, no matter what we do, we're not going to be able to assemble these pieces into anything resembling a tiger". "Second, I'd advise you to relax. Let's have a cup of coffee, then put all these Frosted Flakes back in the box."
  11. Not all tinyclark. Dual brakes in small GA planes were not standard back in the day. I used to fly a '68 Piper that only had brakes on the left.
  12. Oldest in the inventory? Really....74-1671 just logged two combat missions yesterday, bringing it's airframe hours to around 24,440. I don't think those H2's at Maxwell are older.
  13. As promised by the Air Force Special Operations Command vice commander, Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex C-130 sustainment workers were treated to a Feb. 9 tour inside an AC-130W gunship fully loaded with the latest modifications. Maj. Gen. Eugene Haase, AFSOC vice commander, and his crew brought the AC-130W from Hurlburt Field, Fla., to the Robins flight line to keep a vow he made during a similar visit in 2016. “I promised if you guys continued your magic that we would come back with one of our ‘Whiskeys’,” Haase said. “I would tell you that you have, and it’s just been a huge success story up here for us. I mean, you’ve set new standards.” As promised by the Air Force Special Operations Command vice commander, Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex C-130 sustainment workers were treated to a Feb. 9 tour inside an AC-130W gunship fully loaded with the latest modifications. Maj. Gen. Eugene Haase, AFSOC vice commander, and his crew brought the AC-130W from Hurlburt Field, Fla., to the Robins flight line to keep a vow he made during a similar visit in 2016. “I promised if you guys continued your magic that we would come back with one of our ‘Whiskeys’,” Haase said. “I would tell you that you have, and it’s just been a huge success story up here for us. I mean, you’ve set new standards.” Standing on the base operations red carpet leading to the gunship, Haase thanked an assemblage of about 150 C-130 workers for the highly-successful AFSOC acceleration project performed at the Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex. “You probably didn’t realize this, but you set history this fall,” Haase said. “For the first time in the history of AFSOC, we only had two airplanes (here). That was the minimum – the least number of airplanes that we’ve ever had at Robins going through the depot line. So you should be very, very proud of yourselves and what you’re doing – what you’re doing for us; what you’re doing for the country. “These airplanes are over in the AOR, over in the CENTCOM AOR, taking it to the bad guys every night,” he said. “So know that your work is allowing us to provide combat power down range day in and day out.” AFSOC identified a need for improved gunship availability in June 2015. Subsequently, six AFSOC aircraft – three AC-130U gunships and three MC-130H Combat Talon aircraft – arrived at Robins in fiscal 2016 as part of a hard-hitting “acceleration” plan. Partnered with AFSOC, the 560th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron -- with support from throughout the WR-ALC production machine – exceeded all expectations. An AC-130U target was set for a 30 percent acceleration from 180 to 120 flow days. The Robins team delivered three-of-three at an average of 118 flow days. The MC-130H target was set for 27 percent acceleration from 200 to 145 flow days. WR-ALC delivered all three at an average of 135 flow days. Fiscal 2017 requirements have been expanded to include two AC-130W, increasing the Robins total to eight aircraft in the acceleration plan. All of the fiscal 2017 deliveries remain on or ahead of schedule. Prior to the workers tour of the gunship, the general detailed the firepower of the newest AC-130 configuration. He said the aircraft was equipped with 30mm and 105mm guns. The gunship also featured missile launch capability and wing stanchions for small-diameter bombs. The crew of the Spectre 67 remained on board the plane to answer any questions the workers may have had as they toured the inside of the weapon system. “We’re proud to be up here today to let you walk through there,” Haase said. The general pledged to stay until “every person on this base that wants to come out and see this airplane” had a chance to do so. On behalf of the 19,000 men and women of AFSOC, Haase presented a commemorative 105mm shell to Doug Keene, special assistant to the WR-ALC commander. Haase read from the shell inscription saying the gift was a thanks to the complex “for helping AFSOC deliver violence to the enemy anytime, anyplace.” “It always makes us really proud when AFSOC comes to visit us,” Keene said. “It makes us feel like part of the team.” Lt. Gen. Brad Heithold, AFSOC commander, toured the 560th AMXS to see the accelerated PDM work on March 22, 2016. During the visit, Heithold said: "This is not by accident that we have come here to show our appreciation to all of you. We don’t have a lot of these airplanes – every one of them matters.” Haase, a command pilot with more than 3,500 flying hours including 114 combat hours, visited Robins a year ago, bringing an AC-130U “Spooky” gunship as a static display for Robins maintenance crews to tour. “Really appreciate what you do day in and day out for us,” the general said to the team in parting. “Thanks. Proud of y’all. Happy to be here to do this.” Headquartered at Hurlburt Field, AFSOC is the Air Force component of U.S. Special Operations Command. It provides Air Force special operations forces for worldwide deployment and assignment to unified combatant commanders Source: http://www.robins.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1085437/afsoc-general-returns-to-thank-robins-maintainers-provides-gunship-tour View full article
  14. As promised by the Air Force Special Operations Command vice commander, Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex C-130 sustainment workers were treated to a Feb. 9 tour inside an AC-130W gunship fully loaded with the latest modifications. Maj. Gen. Eugene Haase, AFSOC vice commander, and his crew brought the AC-130W from Hurlburt Field, Fla., to the Robins flight line to keep a vow he made during a similar visit in 2016. “I promised if you guys continued your magic that we would come back with one of our ‘Whiskeys’,” Haase said. “I would tell you that you have, and it’s just been a huge success story up here for us. I mean, you’ve set new standards.” Standing on the base operations red carpet leading to the gunship, Haase thanked an assemblage of about 150 C-130 workers for the highly-successful AFSOC acceleration project performed at the Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex. “You probably didn’t realize this, but you set history this fall,” Haase said. “For the first time in the history of AFSOC, we only had two airplanes (here). That was the minimum – the least number of airplanes that we’ve ever had at Robins going through the depot line. So you should be very, very proud of yourselves and what you’re doing – what you’re doing for us; what you’re doing for the country. “These airplanes are over in the AOR, over in the CENTCOM AOR, taking it to the bad guys every night,” he said. “So know that your work is allowing us to provide combat power down range day in and day out.” AFSOC identified a need for improved gunship availability in June 2015. Subsequently, six AFSOC aircraft – three AC-130U gunships and three MC-130H Combat Talon aircraft – arrived at Robins in fiscal 2016 as part of a hard-hitting “acceleration” plan. Partnered with AFSOC, the 560th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron -- with support from throughout the WR-ALC production machine – exceeded all expectations. An AC-130U target was set for a 30 percent acceleration from 180 to 120 flow days. The Robins team delivered three-of-three at an average of 118 flow days. The MC-130H target was set for 27 percent acceleration from 200 to 145 flow days. WR-ALC delivered all three at an average of 135 flow days. Fiscal 2017 requirements have been expanded to include two AC-130W, increasing the Robins total to eight aircraft in the acceleration plan. All of the fiscal 2017 deliveries remain on or ahead of schedule. Prior to the workers tour of the gunship, the general detailed the firepower of the newest AC-130 configuration. He said the aircraft was equipped with 30mm and 105mm guns. The gunship also featured missile launch capability and wing stanchions for small-diameter bombs. The crew of the Spectre 67 remained on board the plane to answer any questions the workers may have had as they toured the inside of the weapon system. “We’re proud to be up here today to let you walk through there,” Haase said. The general pledged to stay until “every person on this base that wants to come out and see this airplane” had a chance to do so. On behalf of the 19,000 men and women of AFSOC, Haase presented a commemorative 105mm shell to Doug Keene, special assistant to the WR-ALC commander. Haase read from the shell inscription saying the gift was a thanks to the complex “for helping AFSOC deliver violence to the enemy anytime, anyplace.” “It always makes us really proud when AFSOC comes to visit us,” Keene said. “It makes us feel like part of the team.” Lt. Gen. Brad Heithold, AFSOC commander, toured the 560th AMXS to see the accelerated PDM work on March 22, 2016. During the visit, Heithold said: "This is not by accident that we have come here to show our appreciation to all of you. We don’t have a lot of these airplanes – every one of them matters.” Haase, a command pilot with more than 3,500 flying hours including 114 combat hours, visited Robins a year ago, bringing an AC-130U “Spooky” gunship as a static display for Robins maintenance crews to tour. “Really appreciate what you do day in and day out for us,” the general said to the team in parting. “Thanks. Proud of y’all. Happy to be here to do this.” Headquartered at Hurlburt Field, AFSOC is the Air Force component of U.S. Special Operations Command. It provides Air Force special operations forces for worldwide deployment and assignment to unified combatant commanders Source: http://www.robins.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1085437/afsoc-general-returns-to-thank-robins-maintainers-provides-gunship-tour
  15. That picture is not blurry. That is exactly what I was seeing when I took the picture.
  16. Who could forget the CBC Band in Saigon. They got out and are still playing around shout Texas area.
  17. Nice photos Billy! Believe me I learned my lesson about following railroad tracks! So many memories about the roof at the Merlin and times downtown Saigon. Times were sure different than now. Glad you and most of my friends survived. By the way, I still have some "love beads" like those but haven't worn them for a long time.
  18. That ain't me. Was my room mate but I did have a shirt like that. It shrunk two sizes since those days in Saigon but I still have it. Feather knows him. Room mate at CCK and back at LRAFB...I had hair for a while early on at FedEx but figured out that I could trim up and clean up and actually have a career. I went into Management and set up the first Ramp at MSY in 1980. We up graded from a Falcon Jet and DC3 to a B-727. Several of our C-130 Pilots at LRAFB went to work for FedEx and I was able to work with them on the FedEx Ramps. I was a lucky one to take my USAF skills to my life on the other side. Later moved to Savannah and opened the FedEx ramp there. The smell of JP4 still gives me a buzz in a funny kind of way. I am thankful every day of the experience and skills I learned in the USAF and would not trade it for anything. This is me at blown up terminal in Phnom Penn. We were the first US aircraft to land there after the assault on the city. It became a regular stop for our crews hauling Cambodians to get trained at Nha Trang.
  19. Nice pic Billy...you dress like that at FedX ? Congrats on keeping a job at the same company for so long. Ha Ha Bill
  20. There is no way to tell what will be accepted. I put together an evidence packet that included Travel Vouchers, APRs noting my TDY days in TSN and number of combat missions flown, pictures of me in Saigon and a narrative about my missions and duties. I was entered into the Agent Orange regestry and had my AO related disability approved without a corrected DD214 or letter from the Air Force confirming BOG in Vietnam. My suggestion is to make your initial packet so compelling that it is more likely than not that you did serve in Vietnam. I did send the same packet to Randolph AFB and got a letter back that acknowledged my Boots on the ground. The letter came back after my decision was rendered awarding me 20%. I might be one of the few that got the VA to actually read a packet and not just look at my DD214.
  21. That Pic is on the roof of the Merlin Hotel....
  22. I like your avatar nice patch....Oh for the days back in the 345th and 2 APS......I hope you learned a lesson not to follow me and Ronnie into the woods. You might end up on train tracks and walk to Cabot..
  23. There was once a young man who, in his youth, professed his desire to become a great writer. When asked to define great, he said, "I want to write stuff that the whole world will read, stuff that people will react to on a truly emotional level, stuff that will make them scream, cry, howl in pain and anger!" He now works for Microsoft writing error messages.
  24. This is part of the Air Force film shot at CCK named "The way we were" narrated by John Wayne. I knew many of the air crew members and I was actually shown getting off a crew bus on the original film. My then wife and I lived downtown Tiachung and they showed us getting off a crew bus at our apartment, that never really happened, I always had to catch a taxi to go to CCK for flights.
  25. Thanks Mike for the timely info. I went thru the paper drill with the gubberment but thankfully I had copies of my travel vouchers for all the TDY's from Clark AB to Vietnam. They grudgingly said I was boots on the ground, am sure it ruined the paper pushers day when he had to do it. Ha Ha Bill
    • Herkmerk
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    • stevedownie

    Fred passed away, see non-sked Fred post on community announcement forum.

  26. A man walks into a bar and sits down. He asks the bartender, "Can I have a cigarette?" The bartender replies, "Sure, the cigarette machine is over there." So he walks over to the machine and as he is about to order a cigarette, the machine suddenly says, "Oi, you bloody idiot." The man says with surprise in his voice, "That's not very nice." He returns to his bar stool without a cigarette and asks the bartender for some peanuts. The bartender passes the man a bowl of peanuts and the man hears one of the peanuts speak, "Ooh, I like your hair." The man says to the bartender, "Hey, what's going on here? Your cigarette machine is insulting me and this peanut is coming on to me. Why's this?" The bartender replies, "Oh, that's because the machine is out of order and the peanuts are complementary." - See more at: http://www.laughfactory.com/jokes/word-play-jokes/11#sthash.vGKHokbw.dpuf
  27. From 16th Airlift Sq. History and Lineage: Emblem: On a Yellow disc edged with a narrow Blue border; a Red lion rampant with Red tongue, White wings, grasping in its dexter paw a White short sword with blade up and in its sinister paw a White rolled scroll, all details Black. Approved on 17 Dec 1980 (KE 72060); replaced emblem approved on 25 Jun 1951 (K 6239).
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