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Aero Precision - Premier C130 Aftermarket Support
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  1. Yesterday
  2. Bahrain

    Saw that Bahrain bought 2 ex RAF J models. Anyone know which ones and what their new tail numbers are? Thanks Bob
  3. New Face

    A married couple was in a terrible accident where the woman's face was severely burned. The doctor told the husband that they couldn't graft any skin from her body because she was too skinny. So the husband offered to donate some of his own skin. However, the only skin on his body that the doctor felt was suitable would have to come from his buttocks. The husband and wife agreed that they would tell no one about where the skin came from, and requested that the doctor also honor their secret. After all, this was a very delicate matter. After the surgery was completed, everyone was astounded at the woman's new beauty. She looked more beautiful than she ever had before! All her friends and relatives just went on and on about her youthful beauty! One day, she was alone with her husband, and she was overcome with emotion at his sacrifice. She said, "Dear, I just want to thank you for everything you did for me. There is no way I could ever repay you." "My darling," he replied, "I get all the thanks I need every time I see your mother kiss you on the cheek."
  4. Last week
  5. PBS Vietnam War

    Well, I have watched the first 5 episodes of the series. The inflated body counts and the playing down of American KIAs and just dis information brings to light a few situations that come back to me. After flying and back on the roof of the Merlin Hotel we would sit around and talk about where we went and what we hauled. The dreaded KIAs would always come up i the conversations. The number we hauled would always be higher than what was reported on the network news. We were just one of three C-130 groups in country. Add in the "Boos" and Choppers and I see now that they were not reporting any where close to the true numbers of KIAs. I never saw the war as political. My war was tactical and my only interest was putting in the chocs after 16 hours of bouncing off dirt strips. Medicate, sleep a little then do it again the next day. Do that for 15 months then go home. That's what I did. Many of my friends came home and became activist. I just went to work and started a family. I survived mine and moved on. I feel so lucky to have made a good decision and Joined the USAF and been selected to be a Loadmaster
  6. ENG RPM

    This really needs more detail. Try to describe the malfunction in detail so we can get a mental picture of what's going on. Torque dropped for only 2 seconds. Which 2 seconds? At the beginning of the 5 seconds that RPM was low? At the end of it? If torque and RPM dropped together, it would indicate air as a likely cause. If Torque stayed high when RPM dropped, then that would indicate a propeller malfunction, and TIT happened to shoot up due to the SCV opening at 94%. If TIT shot up only after RPM dropped to 94%, that would further indicate the propeller as the cause. If TIT shot up before RPM dropped, then that would point to an air malfunction. How did the engine recover? Did you turn off bleed air, adjust the TD switch, or did it come back on it's own? Is there a history? How many hours are on the compressor? You're also missing fuel flow, which might help indicate a fuel or TD system malfunction. You might also include much TIT and Torque moved, as well as the pressure altitude and outside air temperature. A very slight TIT increase might indicate it was fuel related because once the SCV opens, the TIT should shoot up a lot. A large TIT increase should eliminate fuel system as the cause. A SCV malfunction is usually only good for about 5000 in-lbs of torque at power and around sea level, but I'm sure the power loss could get much more severe at high altitude or hot conditions and engine wear level. There's just too many variables for us to be truly helpful with the little information that was provided.
  7. ENG RPM

    I agree with pjvrr99.since TIT Increased it means air mass flow reduced due to bad SSV or mulfuction of anti icing sys.
  8. Finally, I'm a Vietnam Vet !

    The VA card is handy. The ringing in the ears thing amazes me. I am now in the appeals process. I submitted a packet detailing my job, noise exposure and a significant event with a tire explosion killing 3 of my PAX and blowing me off the ramp and still got denied. If you have any thoughts of Gov't Health care look no further than the VA to see why we don't want it.
  9. Business one-liners 65 &n 66: If ignorance is bliss, most of us must be orgasmic. If it can be borrowed and it can be broken, you will borrow it and you will break it. If it doesn't make sense, it's either economics or psychology. If it doesn't work, expand it. If it happens, it must be possible. If it is good, they will stop making it. If it is incomprehensible, it's mathematics. If it is worth doing, it is worth doing for money. If it is worth doing, it is worth over-doing. If it jams, force it. If it breaks, it needed replacing anyway. Business one-liners 66: If it looks too good to be true, it is too good to be true. If it says "one size fits all," it doesn't fit anyone. If it weren't for the last minute, nothing would ever get done. If it works, don't fix it! If idiots could fly, this world would be an airport. If more than one person is responsible for a miscalculation, no one will be at fault. If Murphy's Law can go wrong, it will. If not controlled, work will flow to the competent man until he submerges. If on an actuarial basis there is a 50-50 chance that something will go wrong, it will actually go wrong nine times out of ten. If only one price can be obtained for a quotation, the price will be unreasonable.
  10. Finally, I'm a Vietnam Vet !

    A few years ago more opportunities for veterans, not only retired or disabled, presented themselves. Some are veteran parking spaces, discounts at major retailers, internet shopping at the exchange, and complementary meals. I am using the parking spaces and discounts, but I don't go for the meals. The issue for me was the proof of veteran status. Anyone can say they are a veteran and if challenged an easy validation method would be nice to have. The fellow who had his free meal taken away last year is a good example. He was outed for wearing his hat, I believe, proof positive he could not be a veteran. Now I am not into hats, lots of hair so no cover needed. While visiting a friend two years ago we were trading VN experiences, he was in the 4th infantry at Camp Enari (just a little southeast of Pussy Mountain) in '67-'68. In his pile of vet stuff was a hard plastic VA id card. I decided that I should get one. I had a paper card with a VA number on it from when I got out and had a little dental work done (not much dental care at CCK). I took that down to the VA hospital last year to get a plastic one. They said that number was from the seventies and no good. I had my 214 with me and then things started to happen. First the were amused to have someone there with a birthdate in the forties. Then they rattled off my awards and pronounced me a boots on the grounder veteran. I was reregistered, made a picture VA id card, sent down the hall for an AO consult, and asked if I had any disabilities. I complained of ringing in the ears, so they typed up my application and sent it in for me. Six months later and after a hearing exam I was an official disabled vet. So for me the 214 by itself was adequate. Graywolf may have his "VEM" confused with the VCM. I also have an AFEM on there for something I don't remember. Many ass puckering flights into Osan and Kimpo during my Starlifter time out of TCM. My redacted 214 attached Myth--- If the VCOG is not on your DD-214 you cannot own/wear/display the medal. And you should request a DD-215 listing the VCOG if it is not on your DD-214. Not true. Like the National Defense Medal, the Appreciation of Service Certificate and the Cold War Medal, the VCOG is an 'automatic' award that is fully authorized to ALL veterans who served in Vietnam. If the VCOG is not listed on your DD-214 (because you discharged prior to 1974 or the clerk who typed your DD-214 after 1974 was an airhead) it is not necessary to request a DD-215 as long as your DD-214 displays Vietnam Service. You are 'automatically' fully authorized.
  11. Taiwan C-130 Crash 1965

    My Uncle Rex Bundy was on the 0536. College graduate,excepted into law school. Enlisted,hoping to stay out of Vietnam. Missed not having any cousins.
  12. Engine Power Loss

    I'm assuming a BARV is a Bleed Air Regulator Valve, and when you say "accompanied of TIT", you mean TIT dropped with torque, and not increased. The TD Amp's job is not to maintain power, but to maintain temperature based on the throttle setting. If the TIT is low while the TD Amp is in AUTO, then there is an error with a signal being supplied to the TD Amp, or there is an error with the Amp itself, a setting or malfunction, When you lose air, you lose power for two reasons. Jet engines love more air, both to increase power through expansion, and also to keep the combustion chamber cool. If you lose air, you lose power immediately since there is less air to expand, but also the loss of cooling air causes an increase in TIT, and results in the TD Amp to pull fuel back. This all produces a loss of torque and fuel flow while maintaining TIT. I cannot emphasize this enough, before doing anything, ensure your indications are accurate! TIT to within 6 degrees of actual as measured with a test set and all thermocouples verified good and connected properly. Torque indicator recalibrated and set to within 50 in-lbs of actual. Swap the Fuel Flow gauge with a known good one for good measure, then reverify the problem. Why the engine goes to normal when the Regulator Valve gets turned off is interesting. If the TIT was to remain normal, I would say the Regulator Valve was mis-tuned and the TD Amp was doing its job. Since the TIT is also low, we know the TD Amp is not doing its job (above crossover only). Even if the Regulator was malfunctioning, the TD Amp is definitely having an issue. The fact that the valve affects the TD System operation means they may be connected electrically in some way, like the power/signal wires may be chafing together. If the fuel control was perfectly tuned and we suspected the TD Amp was just inop, we would see high TIT with bleed air open, not low TIT. To check if it is an electrical problem, check power going to the TD Amp using a TD Amp Test Set, then cycle the bleed air valve and see if the power at the Amp changes. There are two types of power going to the Amp, so check them both. If I misunderstood you, and the TIT is high during the malfunction, and not low, then you have a TD Amp malfunction AND a bleed air regulating valve balance issue causing you to lose 2500 in-lbs.
  13. Engine Power Loss

    Loss of Torque (2500 Lbs), accompained of TIT and Fuel Flow with TD AUTO @ Cruise with BARV @ ON position! At Null engine goes to Normal parameters! With BARV OFF, Engine goes to normal parameters!
  14. Engine Power Loss

    Loss of Torque (2500 Lbs), accompained of TIT and Fuel Flow with TD AUTO @ Cruise with BARV @ ON position! At Null engine goes to Normal parameters! With BARV OFF, Engine goes to normal parameters!
  15. Pigmy

    A Hunter walking through the jungle found a huge dead dinosaur with a pigmy standing beside it. Amazed, he asked: "Did you kill that?". The pigmy said "Yes." The hunter asked "How could a little fella like you kill a huge beast like that?" Said the pigmy: "I killed it with my club." The astonished hunter asked: "How big is your club?" The pigmy replied: "There's about 90 of us."
  16. After flying halfway around the world, a C-130J Super Hercules arrived at Yokota Air Base, Japan from Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Sept. 20, 2017. This is the fifth C-130J delivered to Yokota since March. Yokota will receive 14 C-130Js as it modernized its existing fleet. The C-130J is the latest version of the Hercules, entering the Air Force inventory in February 1999. The aircraft has a six-bladed composite propeller coupled to a Rolls-Royce AE2100D3 turbo engine and brings substantial performance improvements.
  17. After flying halfway around the world, a C-130J Super Hercules arrived at Yokota Air Base, Japan from Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Sept. 20, 2017. This is the fifth C-130J delivered to Yokota since March After flying halfway around the world, a C-130J Super Hercules arrived at Yokota Air Base, Japan from Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Sept. 20, 2017. This is the fifth C-130J delivered to Yokota since March. Yokota will receive 14 C-130Js as it modernized its existing fleet. The C-130J is the latest version of the Hercules, entering the Air Force inventory in February 1999. The aircraft has a six-bladed composite propeller coupled to a Rolls-Royce AE2100D3 turbo engine and brings substantial performance improvements. View full article
  18. Seven Special Tactics Airmen from the Kentucky Air National Guard departed the Kentucky ANG base, Louisville, Sept. 20, 2017, for the Caribbean where they will open airfields for humanitarian aid deliveries and resident evacuations in the wake of Hurricane Maria, the third major hurricane to hit the region in the past month. A four-man team from the 123rd Special Tactics Squadron arrived in St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, Sept. 21, while a three-man team from the same unit is scheduled to arrive in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, the same day, said Chief Master Sgt. Aaron May, the squadron’s enlisted manager for combat control. The mission of both teams is the same: clear the airfields of debris, open runways and taxiways and establish air traffic control so military airlift can begin. The teams are prepared, if necessary, to parachute into the fields with chainsaws so they can remove fallen trees and other obstacles, allowing the C-130 Hercules that brought them to land safely and begin offloading rescue gear. The Airmen also deployed with trucks, motorcycles and inflatable motorboats to assist with rescue operations, May said. “(This) deployment marks the third time in the past month that Kentucky Air National Guardsmen have mobilized in support of hurricane rescue operations in the Caribbean,” said Col. David Mounkes, 123rd Airlift Wing commander, parent unit to the 123rd STS. “Our Airmen stand ready at all times to answer the call for help, and we are tremendously grateful to be able to provide this assistance again. Our thoughts and prayers are with the residents of these islands as they continue to weather an unprecedented hurricane season.” The Kentucky ANG deployed more than 80 Airmen to Texas for Hurricane Harvey, establishing an aeromedical evacuation hub and saving 333 residents stranded by floodwaters in the Houston area. The unit later deployed 24 Airmen for rescue operations following Hurricane Irma, helping evacuate more than 1,000 U.S. citizens from the Dutch Caribbean Island of St. Maarten.
  19. Seven Special Tactics Airmen from the Kentucky Air National Guard departed the Kentucky ANG base, Louisville, Sept. 20, 2017, for the Caribbean where they will open airfields for humanitarian aid deliveries and resident evacuations in the wake of Hurricane Maria, the third major hurricane to hit the region in the past month. Seven Special Tactics Airmen from the Kentucky Air National Guard departed the Kentucky ANG base, Louisville, Sept. 20, 2017, for the Caribbean where they will open airfields for humanitarian aid deliveries and resident evacuations in the wake of Hurricane Maria, the third major hurricane to hit the region in the past month. A four-man team from the 123rd Special Tactics Squadron arrived in St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, Sept. 21, while a three-man team from the same unit is scheduled to arrive in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, the same day, said Chief Master Sgt. Aaron May, the squadron’s enlisted manager for combat control. The mission of both teams is the same: clear the airfields of debris, open runways and taxiways and establish air traffic control so military airlift can begin. The teams are prepared, if necessary, to parachute into the fields with chainsaws so they can remove fallen trees and other obstacles, allowing the C-130 Hercules that brought them to land safely and begin offloading rescue gear. The Airmen also deployed with trucks, motorcycles and inflatable motorboats to assist with rescue operations, May said. “(This) deployment marks the third time in the past month that Kentucky Air National Guardsmen have mobilized in support of hurricane rescue operations in the Caribbean,” said Col. David Mounkes, 123rd Airlift Wing commander, parent unit to the 123rd STS. “Our Airmen stand ready at all times to answer the call for help, and we are tremendously grateful to be able to provide this assistance again. Our thoughts and prayers are with the residents of these islands as they continue to weather an unprecedented hurricane season.” The Kentucky ANG deployed more than 80 Airmen to Texas for Hurricane Harvey, establishing an aeromedical evacuation hub and saving 333 residents stranded by floodwaters in the Houston area. The unit later deployed 24 Airmen for rescue operations following Hurricane Irma, helping evacuate more than 1,000 U.S. citizens from the Dutch Caribbean Island of St. Maarten. View full article
    • Casey
    •   
    • Bill Miller

    Haven't noticed your name popping up in a while.  Hope all is well, glad to see you on the site!

     

    --Casey

  20. Business one-liners 63 & 64: If at first you don't succeed, give up. No use being a stupid fool. If at first you don't succeed, redefine success. If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not your sport. If at first you don't succeed, transform your dataset. If at first you don't succeed, try something else. If at first you don't succeed, well...darn. If at first you don't succeed, you probably didn't really care anyway. If at first you don't succeed, you'll get a lot of free advice from folks who didn't succeed either. If at first you don't succeed, you're doing about average. If at first you don't succeed, your successor will. Business one-liners 64: If builders built buildings the way programmers wrote programs, then the first woodpecker that came along would destroy civilization. If enough data is collected, anything can be proven by statistical methods. If everything is coming your way, you are probably in the wrong lane. If everything seems to be going well, you obviously do not know what the hell is going on. If everything seems to go right, check your zipper. If facts do not conform to the theory, they must be disposed of. If flattery gets you nowhere, try bribery. If guns are outlawed, how will we shoot the liberals? If I want your opinion, I'll ask you to fill out the necessary form. If ignorance is bliss, why aren't there more happy people?
  21. Three Bulls

    Three bulls heard via the grapevine that the rancher was going to bring another bull onto the ranch, and the prospect raised a discussion among them. The first bull says, "Boys, we all know I've been here 5 years. Once we settled our differences, we agreed on which 100 of the cows would be mine. Now, I don't know where this newcomer is going to get HIS cows, but I ain't' givin' him any of mine." The second bull says, "That pretty much says it for me, too. I've been here 3 years and have earned my right to the 50 cows we've agreed are mine. I'll fight 'im till I run him off or kill 'im, but I'M KEEPIN' ALL MY COWS." The third bull says, "I've only been here a year, and so far you guys have only let me have 10 cows to "take care of". I may not be as big as you fellows yet, but I am young and virile, so I simply MUST keep all MY cows." They had just finished their big talk when an eighteen-wheeler pulls up in the middle of the pasture with only ONE ANIMAL IN IT: the biggest Son-of-Another-Bull these guys had ever seen! At 4700 pounds, each step he took toward the ground strained the steel ramp to the breaking point. The first bull says, "Ahem...You know, it's actually been some time since I really felt I was doing all my cows justice, anyway. I think I can spare a few for our new friend." The second bull says, "I'll have plenty of cows to take care of if I just stay on the opposite end of the pasture from HIM. I'm certainly not looking for an argument." They look over at their young friend, the third bull, and find him pawing the dirt, shaking his horns, and snorting up a storm. The first bull says, "Son, let me give you some advice real quick. Let him have some of your cows and live to tell about it." The third bull says, "Heck, he can have ALL my cows. I'm just making sure he knows I'M a bull!"
  22. Crowds of friends and family members gathered around a hangar looked up in awe as five C-130H Hercules flew overhead. After several months, the long wait had come to an end. Their loved ones were finally home from deployment. Once the planes landed, crew members waived American flags as planes taxied into place, and loved ones rushed out to greet the newly arrived Airmen. Some were holding small children, while others had balloons or bouquets of flowers and signs with Airmen’s names. Crowds of friends and family members gathered around a hangar looked up in awe as five C-130H Hercules flew overhead. After several months, the long wait had come to an end. Their loved ones were finally home from deployment. Once the planes landed, crew members waived American flags as planes taxied into place, and loved ones rushed out to greet the newly arrived Airmen. Some were holding small children, while others had balloons or bouquets of flowers and signs with Airmen’s names. Beginning Saturday, approximately 150 Airmen from the 94th Operations Group and 94th Maintenance Squadron returned from deployments to the Middle East in support of contingency operations. “It was incredible,” said Lt. Col. Chris Gohlke, 700th Airlift Squadron commander, describing the feeling of seeing his loved ones again after returning from a four-month deployment to Qatar. “It was a very emotional day and a happy day of course.” He said it was also nice to get back to routines and creature comforts left behind so many months ago. “The anticipation of it all is exciting,” Gohlke said. “It helps you take stock in what you’re doing and the sacrifice all these Airmen are making over there, to leave home and do the mission, but it’s worth it when you come back and get back to your family and have that joyous reunion and see everybody.” Deployments are an inevitable part of military life, and with that come many challenges, including leaving loved ones behind for an extended period of time. Many of these challenges began before the deployment. As with any other long-distance trip, it was difficult at times to plan for the logistics of moving people and equipment in such a short amount of time, explained Gohlke. The same was also true for the way back. “I almost felt like getting there and getting home were two of our biggest challenges,” said Gohlke. “Once we were there though and all those obstacles were behind us, we were cruising. We did really good things out there.” The squadron provided tactical airlifts throughout the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility, moving cargo, patients and passengers throughout the theater. They provided support in four major areas: Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, Horn of Africa and Arabian Gulf combat support, Gohlke said. “We were also tasked to support missions into Syria for airdrop operations, which was probably one of the highlights of our deployment, that we got some combat airdrops,” said Gohlke. “We also got some combat air lands into a dirt landing zone in Syria to bring the forward most line of troops and needed supplies, weapons and ammunition. That’s something I know our crews are going to hang their hat on, something they will always remember and be proud they were able to accomplish.” Although deployments can be difficult – be it the time away from family and friends or the difficult working and living conditions – they serve as an important opportunity for Dobbins Airmen to utilize skills they’ve learned in a variety of exercises and training scenarios held throughout the year to prepare them for supporting the mission. “In 2016, we were extremely busy,” said Gohlke. “We did Saber Junction, Maple Flag and Eager Lion. We did all these large scale, OCONUS exercises, which required support from different agencies on base – not just operations and maintenance. I think that helped to exercise some of those relationships and capabilities so that when it came time to deploy, those were sharp tools.” The deployers also return with a variety of skills to help them become more well-rounded Airmen, ready to support Dobbins’ mission and requirements as well. “We gained a lot of experience from our deployment. We can bring that home and then keep that and build upon it here as well and spread it to those who didn’t get to go this time and those who come into our doors brand new, off the street and help make them better prepared for the next one.” View full article
  23. Crowds of friends and family members gathered around a hangar looked up in awe as five C-130H Hercules flew overhead. After several months, the long wait had come to an end. Their loved ones were finally home from deployment. Once the planes landed, crew members waived American flags as planes taxied into place, and loved ones rushed out to greet the newly arrived Airmen. Some were holding small children, while others had balloons or bouquets of flowers and signs with Airmen’s names. Beginning Saturday, approximately 150 Airmen from the 94th Operations Group and 94th Maintenance Squadron returned from deployments to the Middle East in support of contingency operations. “It was incredible,” said Lt. Col. Chris Gohlke, 700th Airlift Squadron commander, describing the feeling of seeing his loved ones again after returning from a four-month deployment to Qatar. “It was a very emotional day and a happy day of course.” He said it was also nice to get back to routines and creature comforts left behind so many months ago. “The anticipation of it all is exciting,” Gohlke said. “It helps you take stock in what you’re doing and the sacrifice all these Airmen are making over there, to leave home and do the mission, but it’s worth it when you come back and get back to your family and have that joyous reunion and see everybody.” Deployments are an inevitable part of military life, and with that come many challenges, including leaving loved ones behind for an extended period of time. Many of these challenges began before the deployment. As with any other long-distance trip, it was difficult at times to plan for the logistics of moving people and equipment in such a short amount of time, explained Gohlke. The same was also true for the way back. “I almost felt like getting there and getting home were two of our biggest challenges,” said Gohlke. “Once we were there though and all those obstacles were behind us, we were cruising. We did really good things out there.” The squadron provided tactical airlifts throughout the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility, moving cargo, patients and passengers throughout the theater. They provided support in four major areas: Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, Horn of Africa and Arabian Gulf combat support, Gohlke said. “We were also tasked to support missions into Syria for airdrop operations, which was probably one of the highlights of our deployment, that we got some combat airdrops,” said Gohlke. “We also got some combat air lands into a dirt landing zone in Syria to bring the forward most line of troops and needed supplies, weapons and ammunition. That’s something I know our crews are going to hang their hat on, something they will always remember and be proud they were able to accomplish.” Although deployments can be difficult – be it the time away from family and friends or the difficult working and living conditions – they serve as an important opportunity for Dobbins Airmen to utilize skills they’ve learned in a variety of exercises and training scenarios held throughout the year to prepare them for supporting the mission. “In 2016, we were extremely busy,” said Gohlke. “We did Saber Junction, Maple Flag and Eager Lion. We did all these large scale, OCONUS exercises, which required support from different agencies on base – not just operations and maintenance. I think that helped to exercise some of those relationships and capabilities so that when it came time to deploy, those were sharp tools.” The deployers also return with a variety of skills to help them become more well-rounded Airmen, ready to support Dobbins’ mission and requirements as well. “We gained a lot of experience from our deployment. We can bring that home and then keep that and build upon it here as well and spread it to those who didn’t get to go this time and those who come into our doors brand new, off the street and help make them better prepared for the next one.”
  24. The U.S. Air Force plans to declare its newest gunship, the AC-130J Ghostrider, ready for combat — or initial operating capability (IOC) in acquisition parlance — this month, but the aircraft won’t actually deploy to a war zone for a couple more years, a general said. “We are declaring IOC, Initial Operating Capability, this month on the AC-J,” Lt. Gen. Marshall “Brad” Webb, head of Air Force Special Operations Command, said Tuesday during a briefing with reporters at the Air Force Association’s annual conference outside Washington, D.C. However, the general added, “That doesn’t mean anything with respect to putting it in combat — we’re still just shy of two years away from wanting to put those in combat.” The reason for the delay is because the high pace of operations in countries like Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria makes it difficult to train special operators on the new weapon system, Webb said. “We’re not waiting around,” he said. “This is a fully configured gunship … The challenge that we have, it’s my problem, is how do we fight the current fight — we have gunships deployed to Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria — and use those same people to convert into a new weapon system? “We’re not going to have the luxury of doing what most normal units do,” he added, referring to the typical transition period for returning troops. ” “So how do I navigate having some capability in the fight, transition those same guys in those same squadrons to a new weapon system, and then build them up at the same time?” Webb said. “So that draws out the timeline from IOC of airframes to train the guys who come back from combat into a new weapon system, have them have a deployed-dwell time to make sure that they’re going to have families at the end of their 20-year career, then bring them back on the battlefield in the Js.” A heavily modified C-130, the AC-130J features fully integrated digital avionics, as well as a “Precision Strike Package.” The latter includes a mission management console, robust communications suite, two electro-optical/infrared sensors, advanced fire control equipment, precision guided munitions delivery capability as well as trainable 30mm and 105mm weapons, according to the Air Force. The cannons can be mounted on both sides of the aircraft. The Air Force currently has 10 of the Ghostriders and plans to buy a total of 37 from manufacturer Lockheed Martin Corp., the general said. The service recently retired the AC-130H and, as of last fiscal year, had a total of 31 AC-130s in the fleet, including three Ghostriders, 16 Spookys and 12 Stinger IIs, according to information compiled by the Air Force Association.
  25. The U.S. Air Force plans to declare its newest gunship, the AC-130J Ghostrider, ready for combat — or initial operating capability (IOC) in acquisition parlance — this month, but the aircraft won’t actually deploy to a war zone for a couple more years, a general said. “We are declaring IOC, Initial Operating Capability, this month on the AC-J,” Lt. Gen. Marshall “Brad” Webb, head of Air Force Special Operations Command, said Tuesday during a briefing with reporters at the Air Force Association’s annual conference outside Washington, D.C The U.S. Air Force plans to declare its newest gunship, the AC-130J Ghostrider, ready for combat — or initial operating capability (IOC) in acquisition parlance — this month, but the aircraft won’t actually deploy to a war zone for a couple more years, a general said. “We are declaring IOC, Initial Operating Capability, this month on the AC-J,” Lt. Gen. Marshall “Brad” Webb, head of Air Force Special Operations Command, said Tuesday during a briefing with reporters at the Air Force Association’s annual conference outside Washington, D.C. However, the general added, “That doesn’t mean anything with respect to putting it in combat — we’re still just shy of two years away from wanting to put those in combat.” The reason for the delay is because the high pace of operations in countries like Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria makes it difficult to train special operators on the new weapon system, Webb said. “We’re not waiting around,” he said. “This is a fully configured gunship … The challenge that we have, it’s my problem, is how do we fight the current fight — we have gunships deployed to Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria — and use those same people to convert into a new weapon system? “We’re not going to have the luxury of doing what most normal units do,” he added, referring to the typical transition period for returning troops. ” “So how do I navigate having some capability in the fight, transition those same guys in those same squadrons to a new weapon system, and then build them up at the same time?” Webb said. “So that draws out the timeline from IOC of airframes to train the guys who come back from combat into a new weapon system, have them have a deployed-dwell time to make sure that they’re going to have families at the end of their 20-year career, then bring them back on the battlefield in the Js.” A heavily modified C-130, the AC-130J features fully integrated digital avionics, as well as a “Precision Strike Package.” The latter includes a mission management console, robust communications suite, two electro-optical/infrared sensors, advanced fire control equipment, precision guided munitions delivery capability as well as trainable 30mm and 105mm weapons, according to the Air Force. The cannons can be mounted on both sides of the aircraft. The Air Force currently has 10 of the Ghostriders and plans to buy a total of 37 from manufacturer Lockheed Martin Corp., the general said. The service recently retired the AC-130H and, as of last fiscal year, had a total of 31 AC-130s in the fleet, including three Ghostriders, 16 Spookys and 12 Stinger IIs, according to information compiled by the Air Force Association. View full article
  26. An English prisoner of war was held by the Germans. The Englishman was shot all over the place, and okay until one day when the German told him, "Englander, your arm is infected with gangrene we must cut it off." The English prisoner said, "Well, okay, but could you drop it over England when you go bombing." The German replied, "Ya, that vill not be a problem." A few weeks later the German tells the Englishman that they have to cut his other arm off. The Englishman says, "Well, could drop it over England like you did last time." "Ya, that will be done," says the German. The next day the German tells him that they have to cut his leg off. Once again the Brit says, "Well, could you do the same as before." The German replies, " ya." The next the German tells him they have to cut his other leg. "Well," begins the Brit, "could you just..." The German snapped, "No! We think you are trying to escape!."
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