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  1. Today
  2. Taiwan C-130 Crash 1965

    I was at CCK when the crash occurred. The loadmaster, Frank Wilson was a buddy and ran with our group. The plane hit a mountain in a remote area leaving TPE. I doubt you can get to the site. It was on a mountain side. Any one of us could have been on that crew but were not. We all had one thing in common. We loved to fly and would go anywhere at any time. All of us crew members were Brothers. Good luck to you in finding the location.
  3. Taiwan C-130 Crash 1965

    I know that the thread is quite old and may have been abandoned but the Crash of October 2, 1970 took the life of my wife's brother Daniel Kritzer who hopped on the plane at last minute. His death of course was tragic and my wife and I are planning on going to the site if possible this coming November. Does anyone have the exact coordinates of the crash? We would really like to stand on the hollowed ground or get as close as we can. Any insight would be greatly appreciated. The memorial to lost airmen in case anyone is interested is located in St. Louis at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. They were laid to rest together.
  4. Believe the airborn Herc in the background is a 193 SOW Commando Solo bird. From what I can see of the Herc parked in the foreground it appears to be a standard bird belonging to the PA. ANG.
  5. Who says cops don't have a sense of humor? The following were taken off of actual police car videos around the country. "Relax, the handcuffs are tight because they're new. They'll stretch out after you wear them awhile." "Take your hands off the car, and I'll make your birth certificate a worthless document." "If you run, you'll only go to jail tired." "Can you run faster than 1,200 feet per second? In case you didn't know, that is the average speed of a 9 mm bullet fired from my gun." "So you don't know how fast you were going. I guess that means I can write anything I want on the ticket, huh?" "Yes, Sir, you can talk to the shift supervisor, but I don't think it will help. Oh ... did I mention that I am the shift supervisor?" "Warning! You want a warning? O.K., I'm warning you not to do that again or I'll give you another ticket." "The answer to this last question will determine whether you are drunk or not. Was Mickey Mouse a cat or a dog?" "Fair? You want me to be fair? Listen, fair is a place where you go to ride on rides, eat cotton candy, and step in monkey poop." "Yeah, we have a quota. Two more tickets and my wife gets a toaster oven." "In God we trust, all others we run through NCIC." "Just how big were those two beers?" "No sir we don't have quotas anymore. We used to have quotas but now we're allowed to write as many tickets as we want." "I'm glad to hear the Chief of Police is a good personal friend of yours. At least you know someone who can post your bail." "You didn't think we give pretty women tickets? You're right, we don't. Sign here."
  6. Yesterday
  7. You Guessed It! More Ponderings: How come you press harder on a remote-control when you know the battery is dead? Have you ever imagined a world with no hypothetical situations? You know how most packages say "Open here".What is the protocol if the package says, "Open somewhere else"? Since Americans throw rice at weddings do orientals throw hamburgers? Why are they called buildings, when they're already finished? Shouldn't they be called builts? Why are they called apartments, when they're all stuck together? Why do people without out a watch look at their wrist when you ask them what time it is? Why do you ask someone without a watch what time it is? Who is General failure and why is he reading my disk ? The light went out, but where to ? Why do banks charge you a "non-sufficient funds fee" on money they already know you don't have? Why is it you have a "pair" of pants and only one bra? How come when I call Information they can't tell me where my keys are? Why do people go to Burger King and Order a Double Whopper with a Large French Fry and insist on getting a Diet Coke? Does the reverse side also have a reverse side? Why is the alphabet in that order? If the universe is everything, and scientists say that the universe is expanding, what is it expanding into? If you got into a taxi and he started driving backwards, would the taxi driver end up owing you money?
  8. The EC-130H Compass Call is a modified Hercules tasked with various types of signals surveillance, interdiction, and disruption. According to the U.S. Air Force official fact sheets, “the Compass Call system employs offensive counter-information and electronic attack (or EA) capabilities in support of U.S. and Coalition tactical air, surface, and special operations forces.” The EC-130H Compass Call is a modified Hercules tasked with various types of signals surveillance, interdiction, and disruption. According to the U.S. Air Force official fact sheets, “the Compass Call system employs offensive counter-information and electronic attack (or EA) capabilities in support of U.S. and Coalition tactical air, surface, and special operations forces.” The USAF EC-130H overall force is quite small, consisting of only 14 aircraft, based at Davis-Monthan AFB (DMAFB), in Tucson, Arizona and belonging to the 55th Electronic Combat Group (ECG) and its two squadrons: the 41st and 43rd Electronic Combat Squadrons (ECS). Also based at DMAFB and serving as the type training unit is the 42nd ECS that operates a lone TC-130H trainer along with some available EC-130Hs made available by the other front-line squadrons. The role of the Compass Call is to disrupt the enemy’s ability to command and control their forces by finding, prioritizing and targeting the enemy communications. This means that the aircraft is able to detect the signals emitted by the enemy’s communication and control gear and jam them so that the communication is denied. The original mission of the EC-130H was SEAD (Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses): the Compass Call were to jam the enemy’s IADS (Integrated Air Defense Systems) and to prevent interceptors from talking with the radar controllers on the ground (or aboard an Airborne Early Warning aircraft). Throughout the years, the role has evolved, making the aircraft a platform capable of targeting also the signals between UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) and their control stations. Although it’s not clear whether this ability has already been translated into an operational capability, in 2015, a USAF EC-130H Compass Call aircraft has also been involved in demos where it attacked networks from the air: a kind of in-flight hacking capability that could be particularly useful to conduct cyber warfare missions where the Electronic Attack aircraft injects malware by air-gapping closed networks. With about one-third of the fleet operating in support of Operation Inherent Resolve (indeed, four EC-130Hs, teaming up with the RC-135 Rivet Joint and other EA assets, are operating over Iraq and Syria to deny the Islamic State the ability to communicate), the fact that a single EC-130H (73-1590 “Axis 43”) was recently deployed from Davis Monthan AFB to Osan Air Base, South Korea, where it arrived via Yokota, on Jan. 4, 2018, it’s pretty intriguing. View full article
  9. The EC-130H Compass Call is a modified Hercules tasked with various types of signals surveillance, interdiction, and disruption. According to the U.S. Air Force official fact sheets, “the Compass Call system employs offensive counter-information and electronic attack (or EA) capabilities in support of U.S. and Coalition tactical air, surface, and special operations forces.” The USAF EC-130H overall force is quite small, consisting of only 14 aircraft, based at Davis-Monthan AFB (DMAFB), in Tucson, Arizona and belonging to the 55th Electronic Combat Group (ECG) and its two squadrons: the 41st and 43rd Electronic Combat Squadrons (ECS). Also based at DMAFB and serving as the type training unit is the 42nd ECS that operates a lone TC-130H trainer along with some available EC-130Hs made available by the other front-line squadrons. The role of the Compass Call is to disrupt the enemy’s ability to command and control their forces by finding, prioritizing and targeting the enemy communications. This means that the aircraft is able to detect the signals emitted by the enemy’s communication and control gear and jam them so that the communication is denied. The original mission of the EC-130H was SEAD (Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses): the Compass Call were to jam the enemy’s IADS (Integrated Air Defense Systems) and to prevent interceptors from talking with the radar controllers on the ground (or aboard an Airborne Early Warning aircraft). Throughout the years, the role has evolved, making the aircraft a platform capable of targeting also the signals between UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) and their control stations. Although it’s not clear whether this ability has already been translated into an operational capability, in 2015, a USAF EC-130H Compass Call aircraft has also been involved in demos where it attacked networks from the air: a kind of in-flight hacking capability that could be particularly useful to conduct cyber warfare missions where the Electronic Attack aircraft injects malware by air-gapping closed networks. With about one-third of the fleet operating in support of Operation Inherent Resolve (indeed, four EC-130Hs, teaming up with the RC-135 Rivet Joint and other EA assets, are operating over Iraq and Syria to deny the Islamic State the ability to communicate), the fact that a single EC-130H (73-1590 “Axis 43”) was recently deployed from Davis Monthan AFB to Osan Air Base, South Korea, where it arrived via Yokota, on Jan. 4, 2018, it’s pretty intriguing.
  10. France's minister of the Armed Forces, officially welcomed the country's first C-130J Super Hercules aircraft to the Armée de l'Air's 62st Transport Wing with a ceremony at Orléans-Bricy Air Base today. Government officials from France and the United States also attended the ceremony, along with representatives from Lockheed Martin. France's minister of the Armed Forces, officially welcomed the country's first C-130J Super Hercules aircraft to the Armée de l'Air's 62st Transport Wing with a ceremony at Orléans-Bricy Air Base today. Government officials from France and the United States also attended the ceremony, along with representatives from Lockheed Martin. France will receive a total of four Super Hercules aircraft — two C-130J-30 combat delivery airlifters and two KC-130J aerial refuelers — through a Foreign Military Sale with the U.S. government, with deliveries taking place through 2019. The first of these aircraft (a C-130J-30 airlifter) was formally delivered to France in December 2017 at the Lockheed Martin facility in Marietta, Georgia, in the United States. France first acquired C-130Hs in 1987 and its new C-130Js will be operated with its existing Hercules fleet. "As a long-time Hercules operator, France has continuously demonstrated to the world the unmatched qualities and versatility found only in a C-130," said George Shultz, vice president and general manager, Air Mobility & Maritime Missions at Lockheed Martin. "France's new Super Hercules fleet delivers increased power, speed and capabilities to ensure that Armée de l'Air crews continue to meet — and exceed — mission requirements for decades to come." France is the 17th country to choose the C-130J for its airlift needs. The C-130J Super Hercules is the most advanced tactical airlifter in operation today, offering superior performance and enhanced capabilities with the range and versatility for every theater of operations and evolving requirements. C-130J 61-PO c/n 5836 View full article
  11. France's minister of the Armed Forces, officially welcomed the country's first C-130J Super Hercules aircraft to the Armée de l'Air's 62st Transport Wing with a ceremony at Orléans-Bricy Air Base today. Government officials from France and the United States also attended the ceremony, along with representatives from Lockheed Martin. France will receive a total of four Super Hercules aircraft — two C-130J-30 combat delivery airlifters and two KC-130J aerial refuelers — through a Foreign Military Sale with the U.S. government, with deliveries taking place through 2019. The first of these aircraft (a C-130J-30 airlifter) was formally delivered to France in December 2017 at the Lockheed Martin facility in Marietta, Georgia, in the United States. France first acquired C-130Hs in 1987 and its new C-130Js will be operated with its existing Hercules fleet. "As a long-time Hercules operator, France has continuously demonstrated to the world the unmatched qualities and versatility found only in a C-130," said George Shultz, vice president and general manager, Air Mobility & Maritime Missions at Lockheed Martin. "France's new Super Hercules fleet delivers increased power, speed and capabilities to ensure that Armée de l'Air crews continue to meet — and exceed — mission requirements for decades to come." France is the 17th country to choose the C-130J for its airlift needs. The C-130J Super Hercules is the most advanced tactical airlifter in operation today, offering superior performance and enhanced capabilities with the range and versatility for every theater of operations and evolving requirements. C-130J 61-PO c/n 5836
  12. SMP1522

    Uhm, what is it for?
  13. Last week
  14. Even More Ponderings: Should vegetarians eat animal crackers? If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you. The pen is mightier than the sword -- if the sword is very small and the pen is real sharp. If you throw a cat out a car window, does it become kitty litter? Call me insane one more time and I'll eat your other eye! I didn't fight my way to the top of the food chain to be a vegetarian. When it rains, why don't sheep shrink? Stupidity got us into this mess. Why can't it get us out? The trouble with doing nothing is that you never know when you are finished. Money isn't everything, but at least it encourages relatives to stay in touch. If a stealth bomber crashes in a forest, does it make a sound? A single fact can spoil a good argument. Growing old is mandatory, but growing up is optional. I do whatever my Rice Krispies tell me to. If someone with multiple personalities threatens to kill himself, is it considered a hostage situation? If you yelled at your plants instead of talking to them, would they still grow? Only to be troubled and insecure? Is it possible to be totally partial? If a parsley farmer is sued, can they garnish his wages? Would a fly without wings be called a walk? Why do they lock gas station bathrooms? Are they afraid someone will clean them? Why do people who know the least know it the loudest? If the funeral procession is at night, do folks drive with their headlights off? If a turtle doesn't have a shell, is he homeless or naked? If the cops arrest a mime, do they tell him he has the right to remain silent? If you're cross-eyed and have dyslexia, can you read all right?
  15. SMP1522

    Hey guys Looking for a book in digital format: SMP1522 Is there anyone can assist me with this? Tnx PJ
  16. Some More Ponderings: Eat right. Stay fit. Die anyway. The things that come to those that wait may be the things left by those who got there first. Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat drinking beer all day. Flashlight: A case for holding dead batteries. Shin: A device for finding furniture in the dark. As long as there are tests, there will be prayer in public schools. When you're swimming in the creek, and an eel bites your cheek, that's a moray! A fine is a tax for doing wrong. A tax is a fine for doing well. It was recently discovered that research causes cancer in rats. The only cure for insomnia is to get more sleep. Everybody lies, but it doesn't matter since nobody listens. Why do they report power outages on TV? Why are builders afraid to have a 13th floor but book publishers aren't afraid to have a Chapter 11? I asked my wife why there were so many dings on the driver's side of her Mercedes and she said the brakes must be bad on that side. After you lose an election, will they let you back into all the exclusive clubs you resigned from? This is the only place in the country where people pull over and stop for a funeral, but speed up to cut off an ambulence or a firetruck. I went out today and bought everything I've been wanting, because now that the elections are over, I know that the politicians are going to take care of the middle class. The best advice for teenagers is, leave home now while you still know everything. I really feel sorry for Madonna's baby, having to grow without a last name. Is it a law of nature that women have to sneeze as soon as they apply their mascara? The two biggest problems in America are making ends meet and making meetings end.
  17. Marines with the Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron (VMGR) 252 out of Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Cherry Point, N.C., the oldest continually active squadron in the Marine Corps, along with their J-model C-130 arrived here in Reno on Wednesday, January 10th. They came to Reno to partake in Advanced Mountain Airlift Tactics School (AMATS) training with the 192nd Airlift Squadron “High Rollers” at the Nevada Air National Guard base. Marines with the Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron (VMGR) 252 out of Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Cherry Point, N.C., the oldest continually active squadron in the Marine Corps, along with their J-model C-130 arrived here in Reno on Wednesday, January 10th. They came to Reno to partake in Advanced Mountain Airlift Tactics School (AMATS) training with the 192nd Airlift Squadron “High Rollers” at the Nevada Air National Guard base. This is the first time the High Rollers have hosted the Marine Corps for “joint” flight training with members of another service branch in the AMATS course. The 192nd provides the training to those units who want to come out and fly with them. AMATS Instructor Pilot Maj. Joe Jaquish said, “Reno offers an exclusive training area that consists of a series of isolated mountain ranges and intervening valleys ranging from 4,000 – 11,000 feet. It also contains local drop zones (DZs) and landing zones (LZs) which are textbook for high desert and mountain training. The terrain closely correlates to that of some of the many countries to which the United States military deploys. The flying course focuses on teaching safe and effective mountain flying.” One of the visiting Marine Corps pilots, Capt. Nick Johnson, said that they have no specific training in the Marine Corps like this and that it serves multiple purposes, “We only fly in and around our base, and, being on the East coast, the terrain is nothing like when you deploy. The terrain around Reno is very similar to the countries we deploy to and it makes tactical sense to fly somewhere similar to the deployed locations.” AMATS is a two-phase C-130 flying syllabus designed to create tactical experts by instructing C-130 H and J-model aircrew in the advanced principles of planning and execution to safely and effectively employ in the high density altitude mountainous environment. Two other visiting Marine Corps pilots, 1st Lts. Ian Penn and Mike Carps agreed that it’s not only the flying that’s great training, “This course offers hands-on mission planning that is not Marine Corps centric, the opportunity to train with the Air National Guard is fantastic because they do things a little differently than we do and that gives us a better understanding of the C-130’s capabilities.” Johnson also stated that they just happened to hear about the course and feel very lucky to have been picked to attend. “We will take what lessons we learn here back to our squadron and hope to get other crews out to Reno for more training.” The 192nd Airlift Squadron’s local flying course, AMATS, has been a valuable training course for pilots from the active duty Air Force, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve. The 192nd can now add Marine Corps pilots to their growing list of attendees View full article
  18. Marines with the Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron (VMGR) 252 out of Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Cherry Point, N.C., the oldest continually active squadron in the Marine Corps, along with their J-model C-130 arrived here in Reno on Wednesday, January 10th. They came to Reno to partake in Advanced Mountain Airlift Tactics School (AMATS) training with the 192nd Airlift Squadron “High Rollers” at the Nevada Air National Guard base. This is the first time the High Rollers have hosted the Marine Corps for “joint” flight training with members of another service branch in the AMATS course. The 192nd provides the training to those units who want to come out and fly with them. AMATS Instructor Pilot Maj. Joe Jaquish said, “Reno offers an exclusive training area that consists of a series of isolated mountain ranges and intervening valleys ranging from 4,000 – 11,000 feet. It also contains local drop zones (DZs) and landing zones (LZs) which are textbook for high desert and mountain training. The terrain closely correlates to that of some of the many countries to which the United States military deploys. The flying course focuses on teaching safe and effective mountain flying.” One of the visiting Marine Corps pilots, Capt. Nick Johnson, said that they have no specific training in the Marine Corps like this and that it serves multiple purposes, “We only fly in and around our base, and, being on the East coast, the terrain is nothing like when you deploy. The terrain around Reno is very similar to the countries we deploy to and it makes tactical sense to fly somewhere similar to the deployed locations.” AMATS is a two-phase C-130 flying syllabus designed to create tactical experts by instructing C-130 H and J-model aircrew in the advanced principles of planning and execution to safely and effectively employ in the high density altitude mountainous environment. Two other visiting Marine Corps pilots, 1st Lts. Ian Penn and Mike Carps agreed that it’s not only the flying that’s great training, “This course offers hands-on mission planning that is not Marine Corps centric, the opportunity to train with the Air National Guard is fantastic because they do things a little differently than we do and that gives us a better understanding of the C-130’s capabilities.” Johnson also stated that they just happened to hear about the course and feel very lucky to have been picked to attend. “We will take what lessons we learn here back to our squadron and hope to get other crews out to Reno for more training.” The 192nd Airlift Squadron’s local flying course, AMATS, has been a valuable training course for pilots from the active duty Air Force, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve. The 192nd can now add Marine Corps pilots to their growing list of attendees
  19. Uruguay is among the pioneering nations in the Antarctic Treaty, keeping military personnel and scientific staff on the frozen continent year-round to conduct research studies for the benefit of all mankind. The Uruguayan Air Force (FAU, in Spanish) already made its first and second flights for the 2017-2018 Summer Campaign in support of General José Artigas Scientific Base in Antarctica. A C-130 Hercules (FAU 591) from the 3rd Air Transport Squadron was deployed for that purpose. Uruguay is among the pioneering nations in the Antarctic Treaty, keeping military personnel and scientific staff on the frozen continent year-round to conduct research studies for the benefit of all mankind. The Uruguayan Air Force (FAU, in Spanish) already made its first and second flights for the 2017-2018 Summer Campaign in support of General José Artigas Scientific Base in Antarctica. A C-130 Hercules (FAU 591) from the 3rd Air Transport Squadron was deployed for that purpose. Uruguayan Minister of Defense Jorge Menéndez attended the plane’s departure and announced the signing of an agreement to process the first patent of the National Antarctic Program between the Uruguayan Ministry of Defense and the University of the Republic of Uruguay. “For more than 30 years, our nation maintained a permanent presence in Antarctica, in accordance with a state policy to promote an Antarctic policy aligned with United Nations’ goals for sustainable development,” Menéndez said prior to the first flight’s departure on November 7th, 2017. “Uruguay joined the Antarctic Treaty in 1980, and since October 7th, 1985, has been one of the 29 advisory members among the 53 nations in the treaty,” the minister added. Annual campaign FAU plans to carry out a total of five flights during the campaign, adding flights in January, February, and April to those conducted in November and December. A crew will also remain on 24-hour standby in case of emergency during Operation ANTARKOS. “On November 7th and December 18th, we made two flights, bringing in provisions and transferring scientific staff to the base that Uruguay has set up in Antarctica,” said to Diálogo FAU Lieutenant Colonel Martín Campoamor, commander of the 3rd Air Transport Squadron. Before each of these special flights, explained Lt. Col. Campoamor, a planning meeting is held, where all data on weather conditions, cargo and passengers is brought together. “Emphasis is always on weather conditions, which is what most limits our operations in Antarctica, where you also have to be very cautious when using the runway, due to visibility conditions.” Each flight departs from the 1st Air Brigade, stationed next to Carrasco International Airport, on the outskirts of Montevideo. From there, it heads to Punta Arenas, the regional capital of Magallanes and of the Chilean Antarctic, where it makes the first layover after a five-hour flight. The next leg is to King George Island in Antarctica, which takes another three hours. The Uruguayan Navy complements the support task to the Uruguayan scientific base. On December 2nd, 2017, the Lüneburg-class logistics supply ship General Artigas ROU-04 left port from Montevideo. Its main mission is to transfer tons of provisions, fuel, and construction materials to supply the base during the mission that will run through 2018. During its operations, the crew carries out a classification and waste treatment process, according to established environmental protocol, which requires that no waste be disposed of in Antarctica. Upon its return, ROU-04 will bring back compressed, packaged, and sealed shredded glass, plastics, and metals for final disposal in Uruguay. Historic flight The C-130 Hercules conducted a historic flight in support of Argentina, when it was deployed to transfer cargo from Rio Gallegos, in the province of Santa Cruz, Argentina, to the Argentinean Antarctic base Marambio, on December 13th. It was the first time that a FAU aircraft landed at that location. “We were on the first leg of the second flight to King George Island in support of the Uruguayan Antarctic Institute. Once we landed, we were enlisted to complete the mission in Marambio, given how both of the Argentine Air Force’s Hercules planes were down,” Lt. Col. Campoamor said. “They needed to transfer diesel to their base to keep everything heated and running—it was running out of supply—so we quickly requested all the information needed, such as weather and runway conditions. It was an honor to carry out that mission, which burnished the reputation of the Uruguayan Air Force and Uruguay as well.” FAU has made flights to support General Artigas Scientific Base in Antarctica since 1984. It made its first flight on January 28th of that year with Fairchild Hiller FH-227 aircraft and later used Aviocar C-212 aircraft. Today, FAU carries out campaigns with two C-130 Hercules acquired in 1991. View full article
  20. Uruguay is among the pioneering nations in the Antarctic Treaty, keeping military personnel and scientific staff on the frozen continent year-round to conduct research studies for the benefit of all mankind. The Uruguayan Air Force (FAU, in Spanish) already made its first and second flights for the 2017-2018 Summer Campaign in support of General José Artigas Scientific Base in Antarctica. A C-130 Hercules (FAU 591) from the 3rd Air Transport Squadron was deployed for that purpose. Uruguayan Minister of Defense Jorge Menéndez attended the plane’s departure and announced the signing of an agreement to process the first patent of the National Antarctic Program between the Uruguayan Ministry of Defense and the University of the Republic of Uruguay. “For more than 30 years, our nation maintained a permanent presence in Antarctica, in accordance with a state policy to promote an Antarctic policy aligned with United Nations’ goals for sustainable development,” Menéndez said prior to the first flight’s departure on November 7th, 2017. “Uruguay joined the Antarctic Treaty in 1980, and since October 7th, 1985, has been one of the 29 advisory members among the 53 nations in the treaty,” the minister added. Annual campaign FAU plans to carry out a total of five flights during the campaign, adding flights in January, February, and April to those conducted in November and December. A crew will also remain on 24-hour standby in case of emergency during Operation ANTARKOS. “On November 7th and December 18th, we made two flights, bringing in provisions and transferring scientific staff to the base that Uruguay has set up in Antarctica,” said to Diálogo FAU Lieutenant Colonel Martín Campoamor, commander of the 3rd Air Transport Squadron. Before each of these special flights, explained Lt. Col. Campoamor, a planning meeting is held, where all data on weather conditions, cargo and passengers is brought together. “Emphasis is always on weather conditions, which is what most limits our operations in Antarctica, where you also have to be very cautious when using the runway, due to visibility conditions.” Each flight departs from the 1st Air Brigade, stationed next to Carrasco International Airport, on the outskirts of Montevideo. From there, it heads to Punta Arenas, the regional capital of Magallanes and of the Chilean Antarctic, where it makes the first layover after a five-hour flight. The next leg is to King George Island in Antarctica, which takes another three hours. The Uruguayan Navy complements the support task to the Uruguayan scientific base. On December 2nd, 2017, the Lüneburg-class logistics supply ship General Artigas ROU-04 left port from Montevideo. Its main mission is to transfer tons of provisions, fuel, and construction materials to supply the base during the mission that will run through 2018. During its operations, the crew carries out a classification and waste treatment process, according to established environmental protocol, which requires that no waste be disposed of in Antarctica. Upon its return, ROU-04 will bring back compressed, packaged, and sealed shredded glass, plastics, and metals for final disposal in Uruguay. Historic flight The C-130 Hercules conducted a historic flight in support of Argentina, when it was deployed to transfer cargo from Rio Gallegos, in the province of Santa Cruz, Argentina, to the Argentinean Antarctic base Marambio, on December 13th. It was the first time that a FAU aircraft landed at that location. “We were on the first leg of the second flight to King George Island in support of the Uruguayan Antarctic Institute. Once we landed, we were enlisted to complete the mission in Marambio, given how both of the Argentine Air Force’s Hercules planes were down,” Lt. Col. Campoamor said. “They needed to transfer diesel to their base to keep everything heated and running—it was running out of supply—so we quickly requested all the information needed, such as weather and runway conditions. It was an honor to carry out that mission, which burnished the reputation of the Uruguayan Air Force and Uruguay as well.” FAU has made flights to support General Artigas Scientific Base in Antarctica since 1984. It made its first flight on January 28th of that year with Fairchild Hiller FH-227 aircraft and later used Aviocar C-212 aircraft. Today, FAU carries out campaigns with two C-130 Hercules acquired in 1991.
  21. A Tampa company has been awarded a $40 million contract to help foreign military pilots learn how to fly C-130 transport planes. Those are the big boys that transport everything from equipment to soldiers and even fly into hurricanes. The 5-year deal with the company named CAE could also benefit our local economy. A Tampa company has been awarded a $40 million contract to help foreign military pilots learn how to fly C-130 transport planes. Those are the big boys that transport everything from equipment to soldiers and even fly into hurricanes. The 5-year deal with the company named CAE could also benefit our local economy. Located just north of Tampa International Airport, you'd never know what goes on inside the nondescript building, and that’s probably the way they like it since some of what CAE does is top secret. But for this story, the company let us past security to show you why they just landed a $40 million defense contract. The five-year deal will help foreign militaries learn to fly C-130 aircraft using CAE’s massive flight simulators. “Obviously, the U.S. Air Force wants to make sure they're properly trained so they can support not only their missions, but support missions in which the U.S. needs assistance,” said CAE USA’s President Ray Duquette. Every button knob and switch inside the simulator is identical to the real thing. The C-130 has been a versatile go-to workhorse for more than 50 years, transporting people, equipment, even flying into storms. One of the big reasons foreign militaries will send pilots to CAE for their training is so they don't have to use a real aircraft in their countries. However, CAE software can change the terrain, weather, lighting conditions, almost anything to replicate the areas those pilots come from. “So this is a good way of being exposed to the elements, to the environment, to the threats that are out there, and to potential emergencies at the may encounter,” said Duquette. CAE's simulators, which mimic the real thing in stunning detail, also cost a fraction of flying real aircraft. Under the military contract, each year nearly 1,500 people will come to Tampa to train from all over the globe. They’ll stay at local hotels and eat at local restaurants, boosting the local economy. “We bring them in,” said Duquette, “They could be here for a week. Some of them are initial pilots, so they have been trained in the C-130, so they're going through that initial training. And that could be months of training.” CAE also manufactured the flight simulator that trains pilots to operate the KC-135. Those are the huge refueling tankers that fly out of MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa. The operation may be all about simulations, but the international military alliances being forged here over the next five years are very real. View full article
  22. A Tampa company has been awarded a $40 million contract to help foreign military pilots learn how to fly C-130 transport planes. Those are the big boys that transport everything from equipment to soldiers and even fly into hurricanes. The 5-year deal with the company named CAE could also benefit our local economy. Located just north of Tampa International Airport, you'd never know what goes on inside the nondescript building, and that’s probably the way they like it since some of what CAE does is top secret. But for this story, the company let us past security to show you why they just landed a $40 million defense contract. The five-year deal will help foreign militaries learn to fly C-130 aircraft using CAE’s massive flight simulators. “Obviously, the U.S. Air Force wants to make sure they're properly trained so they can support not only their missions, but support missions in which the U.S. needs assistance,” said CAE USA’s President Ray Duquette. Every button knob and switch inside the simulator is identical to the real thing. The C-130 has been a versatile go-to workhorse for more than 50 years, transporting people, equipment, even flying into storms. One of the big reasons foreign militaries will send pilots to CAE for their training is so they don't have to use a real aircraft in their countries. However, CAE software can change the terrain, weather, lighting conditions, almost anything to replicate the areas those pilots come from. “So this is a good way of being exposed to the elements, to the environment, to the threats that are out there, and to potential emergencies at the may encounter,” said Duquette. CAE's simulators, which mimic the real thing in stunning detail, also cost a fraction of flying real aircraft. Under the military contract, each year nearly 1,500 people will come to Tampa to train from all over the globe. They’ll stay at local hotels and eat at local restaurants, boosting the local economy. “We bring them in,” said Duquette, “They could be here for a week. Some of them are initial pilots, so they have been trained in the C-130, so they're going through that initial training. And that could be months of training.” CAE also manufactured the flight simulator that trains pilots to operate the KC-135. Those are the huge refueling tankers that fly out of MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa. The operation may be all about simulations, but the international military alliances being forged here over the next five years are very real.
  23. Being 6 Again

    Being 6 Again A man asked his wife what she'd like for her birthday. "I'd love to be six again," she replied. On the morning of her birthday, he got her up bright and early and off they went to a local theme park. What a day! He put her on every ride in the park: the Death Slide, the Screaming Loop, the Wall of Fear, everything there was! Wow! Five hours later she staggered out of the theme park, her head reeling and her stomach upside down. Right to a McDonald's they went, where her husband ordered her a Happy Meal with extra fries and a refreshing chocolate shake. Then it was off to a movie, the latest Star Wars epic, a hot dog, popcorn, soda, and M&Ms. What a fabulous adventure! Finally she wobbled home with her husband and collapsed into bed. He leaned over and lovingly asked, "Well, dear, what was it like being six again?" One eye opened. "You idiot, I meant my dress size." The moral of this story: Even when the man is listening, he's still gonna get it wrong.
  24. Cascade Aerospace Inc. (Cascade) is pleased to announce that it has been awarded a contract for the avionics modernization of one Fuerza Aérea Mexicana (FAM) L-100 (C-130) Hercules aircraft. This contract follows on the recent delivery of two modernized C-130K Hercules aircraft delivered to the FAM and fitted with advanced digital avionics from Rockwell Collins. Cascade Aerospace Inc. (Cascade) is pleased to announce that it has been awarded a contract for the avionics modernization of one Fuerza Aérea Mexicana (FAM) L-100 (C-130) Hercules aircraft. This contract follows on the recent delivery of two modernized C-130K Hercules aircraft delivered to the FAM and fitted with advanced digital avionics from Rockwell Collins. This program will be contracted through the Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) under the auspices of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Canadian and Mexican governments. "Completing the C-130 fleet modernization represents a significant milestone for Cascade and affirms our excellent relationship with the Mexican Air Force as a support provider of choice since 2013," said Cascade's COO & EVP, Kevin Lemke. "The upgrade of this aircraft will establish a common cockpit configuration for the entire FAM C-130 fleet thereby enhancing fleet capability as well as providing efficiencies in maintenance, training, and operational availability." This modernization program includes the installation and integration of an advanced Rockwell Collins Flight2 TM digital avionics suite. In addition, Cascade will provide operational and technical training for Mexican Air Force personnel at the company's facility and headquarters in Abbotsford, British Columbia. About Cascade Aerospace Cascade Aerospace, an operating unit of IMP Aerospace & Defense, is a leading Canadian specialty aerospace contractor that provides long-term integrated aircraft fleet support and program management, aircraft maintenance, modification, engineering & integrated logistics support to domestic and international military, government, and commercial customers. About Canadian Commercial Corporate (CCC) Established in 1946, the Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) is a Federal Crown corporation of the Government of Canada that acts as Canada's international contracting and procurement agency. CCC reports to Parliament through the Minister of International Trade. CCC acts as the prime contractor for foreign governments who wish to contract with Canadian companies and expertise through a government-to-government channel. CCC's strong relationships with international buyers and access to Canada's innovative industrial base, puts CCC in a unique position to facilitate and promote international trade. View full article
  25. Cascade Aerospace Inc. (Cascade) is pleased to announce that it has been awarded a contract for the avionics modernization of one Fuerza Aérea Mexicana (FAM) L-100 (C-130) Hercules aircraft. This contract follows on the recent delivery of two modernized C-130K Hercules aircraft delivered to the FAM and fitted with advanced digital avionics from Rockwell Collins. This program will be contracted through the Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) under the auspices of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Canadian and Mexican governments. "Completing the C-130 fleet modernization represents a significant milestone for Cascade and affirms our excellent relationship with the Mexican Air Force as a support provider of choice since 2013," said Cascade's COO & EVP, Kevin Lemke. "The upgrade of this aircraft will establish a common cockpit configuration for the entire FAM C-130 fleet thereby enhancing fleet capability as well as providing efficiencies in maintenance, training, and operational availability." This modernization program includes the installation and integration of an advanced Rockwell Collins Flight2 TM digital avionics suite. In addition, Cascade will provide operational and technical training for Mexican Air Force personnel at the company's facility and headquarters in Abbotsford, British Columbia. About Cascade Aerospace Cascade Aerospace, an operating unit of IMP Aerospace & Defense, is a leading Canadian specialty aerospace contractor that provides long-term integrated aircraft fleet support and program management, aircraft maintenance, modification, engineering & integrated logistics support to domestic and international military, government, and commercial customers. About Canadian Commercial Corporate (CCC) Established in 1946, the Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) is a Federal Crown corporation of the Government of Canada that acts as Canada's international contracting and procurement agency. CCC reports to Parliament through the Minister of International Trade. CCC acts as the prime contractor for foreign governments who wish to contract with Canadian companies and expertise through a government-to-government channel. CCC's strong relationships with international buyers and access to Canada's innovative industrial base, puts CCC in a unique position to facilitate and promote international trade.
  26. C-130J training manuals

    Are you talking about maintenance? If so, the old system of 9 or so volumes is over with. As a matter of fact, the old -2-X series isn't even supposed to be used. The newer OMMS style manuals have to be used. There is now a: 130J-2-00GV-00-1 GENERAL VEHICLE MANUAL which covers general serving, parking, mooring, etc. General System (GS) Manuals. The GS manuals provide detailed system and subsystem description, as well as theory of operation. Separate GS manuals are provided for each system. Job Guide (JG) Manuals. The JG manuals provide detailed start-to-finish, step-by-step maintenance procedures. The step-by-step instructions are fully illustrated with facing-page art except for steps that reference other data. Switches, controls, and indicators shown in the illustrations may not be shown in the position required by the text. Each JG manual is divided into tasks that cover a particular maintenance action such as rigging, removal and installation, operational checkout, etc. There are some 25 GS manuals and hundreds and hundreds of job guides. This is on all tech manuals. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT - Distribution authorized to U.S. Government agencies and their contractors (Administrative or Operational Use) (15 January 2004). Other requests for this document shall be referred to C130SG/LGJ, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7239. Questions concerning technical content should be directed to C130SG/LGJ. WARNING - This document contains technical data whose export is restricted by the Arms Export Control Act (Title 22, U.S.C., Sec 2751 et. seq.) or the Export Administration Act of 1979, as amended (Title 50, U.S.C., App. 2401 et. seq.). Violations of these export laws are subject to severe criminal penalties.
  27. Aircraft conversion

    Suppose to be in FY 19...although they are suppose to initially operate their first three-four tails out of Wright Patt until facilities etc at Pittsburgh can be updated to accommodate the new acft.
  28. A man walked into a supermarket, asking to buy half a head of lettuce. The stock boy told him that they only sold whole heads of lettuce, but the man was insistent: he did not need a whole head, only a half head. The boy said he would go ask his manager about the matter. The boy walked into the back room and said, "There's some asshole out there who wants to buy only a half a head of lettuce." As he finished speaking, he turned around to find the man standing right behind him, so he added, "--and this gentleman wants to buy the other half." The manager okayed the deal and the man went on his way. Afterward, the manager said "You almost got yourself in a lot of trouble earlier, but I must say I was impressed with the way you got yourself out of it. You think on your feet and we like that around here. Where are you from, son?". "Texas, sir". "Oh really? Why did you leave Texas?" Asked the manager. The boy said, "Nothing but hookers and ball players down there." "Hey!" Said the manager, "My wife is from Texas!!" "No kidding!" Says the boy. "What team did she play for?"
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