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Casey

C-130 News: C-130 Crash in Mississippi

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Casey   
Casey

4 people killed after Military plane crashes in Sunflower County

The FAA confirms a Military Plane has crashed at the Sunflower and Leflore county line.

The crash was reported Monday Evening on Moorehead and Itta Bena Roads.

 

 

4 people killed after Military plane crashes in Sunflower County

The FAA confirms a Military Plane has crashed at the Sunflower and Leflore county line.

The crash was reported Monday Evening on Moorehead and Itta Bena Roads.

Several fire departments responded to the aircraft down in a field and burning.

The plane could be seen burning and producing large clouds of black smoke from Highway 82.

Investigators say the plane is a C-130, which departed from Cherry Point, North Carolina with eight people on board. At least four people are confirmed

Source: http://www.wapt.com/article/plane-crashes-in-sunflower-county/10286085

By Keegan Foxx

2017-07-10 Crash.jpg


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Casey   
Casey

Article from News Channel Three in Memphis

LEFLORE COUNTY, Miss. — A military plane has crashed in Mississippi, and WREG has confirmed there are fatalities.

A law enforcement officer on the scene said the plane, a C-130 was carrying eight people.

It crashed in a field near County Road 237 and Highway 82, which is near the LeFlore County/Sunflower County line.

Five people have been confirmed dead, the officer said, but they’re still trying to account for all the crew members.

WLBT reported the plane was coming from Memphis.

We’re working to learn more information.

Source: http://wreg.com/2017/07/10/at-least-4-dead-after-army-plane-from-memphis-crashes-in-leflore-county-mississippi/

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Casey   
Casey

From the Clarion Ledger

A C-130 has crashed in LeFlore County, claiming at least five lives, officials said.

Sheriff Ricky Banks said there are five confirmed dead as of 6:15 p.m. and that there are supposed to be nine people aboard.

LeFlore County deputy coroner Will Gnemi has confirmed that the coroner's office has been called to the scene. He said they are still looking for victims, so he doesn't know how many victims there will be by the end of the day.

"Please join Deborah and me in praying for those hurting after this tragedy," Governor Phil Bryant said in a statement on Facebook. "Our men and women in uniform risk themselves every day to secure our freedom."

Mississippi Emergency Management Agency Director Lee Smithson said the plane is a C-130. It crashed on the Sunflower-Leflore county line, he said.

He said it's also unknown to him at this point if the plane came from the Tennessee National Guard or if it is active duty Air Force, but the preliminary report is that it came from the Millington base.

Source: http://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/local/2017/07/10/plane-crashes-leflore-county/466582001/?hootPostID=3877917349461d430bd529df469c7508

 

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Old A/R Guy   
Old A/R Guy

Not sure how you achieve this, but from the aerial photos that are starting to come out, it looks like it did an inverted flat splash.  The acft appears to be belly-up.  May they rest in peace.  Pray for their families.

The acft seems to be missing most of the right horizontal stab.  Rudder/elevator/flap (?) surface seems to be laying in the soybeans aft of the beaver tail.  Both elevator surfaces seem to be missing?

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Metalbasher   
Metalbasher
10 hours ago, Old A/R Guy said:

Not sure how you achieve this, but from the aerial photos that are starting to come out, it looks like it did an inverted flat splash.  The acft appears to be belly-up.  May they rest in peace.  Pray for their families.

The acft seems to be missing most of the right horizontal stab.  Rudder/elevator/flap (?) surface seems to be laying in the soybeans aft of the beaver tail.  Both elevator surfaces seem to be missing?

Very sad indeed.  May they rest in peace.

I was just thinking the same thing...looks like it fell out of the sky inverted.  What's puzzling is looking the pix, it appears everything forward of the center wing, i.e. forward fuselage is gone.  The other thing is why the FBI is involved and no mention of NTSB.  Just not accustomed to seeing/hearing FBI involved so fast and no references to NTSB being on the scene. 

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Old A/R Guy   
Old A/R Guy

Metalbasher...I noticed that too...where did the forward fuselage go?  The entire nose/crew compartment of a 130 can be removed from the fuselage at the 245 bulkhead ring of bolts.  Would love to get a look at that.  Reports of bodies and debris quite some distance from the main crash site would lead to the conclusion that the forward fuselage separated from the rest of the acft in flight...?

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Casey   
Casey

From WaridBoring.com

The KC-130T had taken off from Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point in North Carolina and reportedly landed for refueling in Memphis, Tennessee.

While VMGR-252, an active-duty KC-130J unit, is stationed at Cherry Point, the transport actually came from Marine Aerial Refueling Transport Squadron 452 of the 4th Marine Air Wing, a Marine Forces Reserve unit based at Stewart Air National Guard Base in Newburgh, New York.

Unlike the modernized KC-130J variant that predominates in Marine Corps service, the KC-130T is an upgrade of the older C-130H transport.

While flying at 20,000 feet, the KC-130 suddenly began spinning out of control towards the ground and ceased responding to radio transmissions. Video footage of the aftermath shows the flaming remains of the plane completely flattened in a soybean field close to U.S. Highway 82, 85 miles north of Jackson, Mississippi.

The wreckage burned for at least six hours, casting tall plumes of black smoke high into the air. Greenwood Fire Department chief Marcus Banks reported his fire fighters expended 4,000 gallons of fire-retardant foam combating the blaze, which repeatedly exploded and flared up so violently that they were forced to pull back at one point.

The plane was reportedly carrying small arms and ammunition which may have cooked off after the crash, leading to a explosive disposal unit also being dispatched to the crash site.

 

Read more at: https://warisboring.com/u-s-marine-corps-kc-130-crash-kills-16-people/

 

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Casey   
Casey
6 hours ago, Old A/R Guy said:

Metalbasher...I noticed that too...where did the forward fuselage go?  The entire nose/crew compartment of a 130 can be removed from the fuselage at the 245 bulkhead ring of bolts.  Would love to get a look at that.  Reports of bodies and debris quite some distance from the main crash site would lead to the conclusion that the forward fuselage separated from the rest of the acft in flight...?

 cockpit and parts of the fuselage had fallen one mile from the main crash site

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4683912/Military-plane-crashes-Mississippi-killing-six-people.html#ixzz4mZs6rvqU

 

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BRlang   
BRlang

I have a question. If traveling to California then why was the plane 100 miles due south of Memphis. I worked for FedEx and when we departed MEM on 18 we make a hard right turn and climb out going west. The plane should have never even been past Tunica which is about 80 miles north of the crash site.

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bobdaley   
bobdaley

I saw something about maybe it was going to or from the old Memphis NAS at Millington. Also that it was 165000 from VMGR-452 USMCR at Stewart ANGB NY?

Bob

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BRlang   
BRlang

I'm very familiar with Millington NAS. It is about 20 nm north of MEM international. They stopped for refueling. That makes perfectly good sense as a fuel stop. The air traffic out of Millington is well clear of MEM. They should have been climbing out over Arkansas and no reason to even be over Mississippi. I have flown LRAFB to Travis AFB. It is a long leg. I can't see any reason for them to add 30 minutes to the already longer leg. No WX in the area to vector them that far south.  

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Casey   
Casey
4 hours ago, bobdaley said:

I saw something about maybe it was going to or from the old Memphis NAS at Millington. Also that it was 165000 from VMGR-452 USMCR at Stewart ANGB NY?

Bob

From the New York Times

The aircraft that crashed bore registration number 165000 and was nicknamed Triple Nuts for the three zeros. It belonged to Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 452, or VMGR-452, nicknamed the Yankees, a Reserve unit based at Stewart Air National Guard Base in Newburgh, N.Y., about 60 miles north of New York City.

The plane was built in 1993. In its life, it refueled fighter jets patrolling the no-fly zone in Iraq before the 2003 invasion, and later it ferried troops and equipment into and out of the war zones in Iraq and Afghanistan, assignments that meant using rutted runways in dusty locales, according to records and photographs taken of it over the years.

Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/12/us/mississippi-marine-transport-plane-crash.html

KC-130T 165000 c/n 5303

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bobdaley   
bobdaley

It was badly damaged in a thunderstorm at Carswell in 2004 and repaired.

Bob

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Chuck   
Chuck

IN 1969 at CCK  we lost 2? at cruise alt that departed CCK forTaipei that I believe was a runaway prop.... the nxt time it happened the flight deck caught  it in time? I was in country during both & i seem to remember that there was talk of grounding the E's until that flight crew caught and pulled it out.... Going in inverted made my not so sharp anymore thinking.... 

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bobdaley   
bobdaley

Got this in an e mail this AM, I added the bureau numbers

Marine KC-130 Has Good Safety Record

By: Megan Eckstein
USNI News

July 11, 2017
Updated: July 12, 2017

The KC-130T crash that killed 15 Marines and a sailor is one of only three major in-flight incidents in that aircraft type in almost the last 40 years, making the plane among the safest in use today.

The C-130 Hercules, which serves as both an aerial refueling tanker and a troop and cargo transport plane for the Marine Corps, has among the best safety records in the service. It has only experienced three in-flight Class A mishaps — incidents involving loss of life or permanent disability, total loss of an aircraft, or more than $2 million in damages — according to Naval Safety Center data dating back to 1980, the center told USNI News today.

Two of those Class A mishaps occurred in 2002, with the third being this week’s crash.

“The KC-130 has one of the lowest mishap rates of all Marine Corps aircraft,” Marine Corps spokeswoman Capt. Sarah Burns told USNI News today. “Over the past 15 years, there have been only three Class A Flight Mishaps involving all Marine Corps models of the C-130, including the crash on July 10th. In 2002, there was a mishap in Pakistan which resulted in seven deaths and a mishap in California with no fatalities.”

The aircraft type has also only experienced four ground-based Class A mishaps, including incidents such as towing and taxiing mishaps.

The Naval Safety Center described the seven total Marine Class A mishaps as follows:
• On Sept. 19, 1980, a KC-130F maintainer was killed in a ground mishap in California when the Marine was exposed to fatal levels of solvent fumes.
• On Oct. 8, 1997, a KC-130F in Okinawa experienced a bleed-air ducting failure during a high-power post-maintenance run.149807
• On Jan. 9, 2002, a KC-130R in Pakistan experienced a flash fire and crashed into a mountain during its final turn headed towards an airfield in theater. Burns added this crash killed seven personnel onboard. 160021
• On Feb. 11, 2002, a KC-130F crash-landed shortly after taking off from California, leading to major and minor injuries, but no deaths. 148895
• On March 23, 2010, a KC-130J wingtip struck other aircraft while taxiing in Okinawa, Japan.
• On July 28, 2016, a KC-130T experienced massive hail damage while parked on the ramp at Peterson Field in Colorado. 163592, repaired?
• On July 10, 2017, a KC-130T crashed in a field in Mississippi, killing all 16 personnel onboard. 165000
• Additionally, on Jan. 9, 1990, a KC-130T was refueling another aircraft when the receiving aircraft caught fire. The pilot of that airplane ejected and survived, but that aircraft was a total loss. The KC-130T was unharmed and landed safely. This incident was at first logged as a Class A mishap for a KC-130, but the Naval Safety Center later clarified that it was only incidentally involved and that the Class A mishap was due to the other airplane.

The Marine Corps currently only operates the KC-130J in its active units and the KC-130T in one remaining reserve unit. The KC-130F and R have since been retired.

The C-130 family of planes was first introduced in 1954 and has been flown by the U.S. Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, and Coast Guard, as well as by more than 70 countries around the world. The KC-130T specifically was first flown by the Marine Corps in 1983, according to Naval Air Systems Command. The Marines’ 2017 aviation plan notes the squadron involved in the crash, VMGR-452, is the last unit still operating these older planes. The active-duty units all transitioned to the new KC-130J by 2009 and the other Reserve units are transitioning or have completed the transition. VMGR-452 is expected to begin its upgrade to the new planes in Fiscal Year 2019.

Additionally, Monday afternoon’s crash was unique in its great loss of life. Burns told USNI News this was the deadliest Marine Corps aviation crash in 12 years.

“In addition to the most recent mishap on July 10, there has been only one mishap that resulted in the loss of 16 or more lives. In January 2005, a CH-53E Super Stallion crashed in Iraq, killing 30 Marines and one sailor.”

She told USNI News that that crash happened at

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