Jump to content
Aero Precision provides OEM part support for military aircraft operators across more than 20 aircraft
Sign in to follow this  
edwardlcy

eng oil temp

Recommended Posts

Most humbled greetings fellow forummers!

My sqn operates a fleet of C130H-30 which is the extended version of the C130H, its engine does not have augmentation.

I understand the on ground operation the limitation of eng oil temp is below 85 celcius and 30 minutes operation at 85-100 celcius and engine shutdown at oil temp above 100 celcius. Does this limitation applies to all version of c130? with or without augmentation?

My observation about the oil temp in many of the engines operating in our fleet that at OAT of around 30C the eng oil temp has a tendency to go above 85C at NSGI. Is that a normal occurence?

In reaction to that, pilots activate LSGI and advanced engine throttle by a knob to bring the eng oil temp under control. They have been griping about having to take this extra precautionary step.

My question is if there is any other solution to lower the eng oil temp in ground operation. does changing the brand/type of engine oil used help? currently using Aeroshell MIL-23699 spec.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most humbled greetings fellow forummers!

My sqn operates a fleet of C130H-30 which is the extended version of the C130H, its engine does not have augmentation.

I understand the on ground operation the limitation of eng oil temp is below 85 celcius and 30 minutes operation at 85-100 celcius and engine shutdown at oil temp above 100 celcius. Does this limitation applies to all version of c130? with or without augmentation?

My observation about the oil temp in many of the engines operating in our fleet that at OAT of around 30C the eng oil temp has a tendency to go above 85C at NSGI. Is that a normal occurence?

In reaction to that, pilots activate LSGI and advanced engine throttle by a knob to bring the eng oil temp under control. They have been griping about having to take this extra precautionary step.

My question is if there is any other solution to lower the eng oil temp in ground operation. does changing the brand/type of engine oil used help? currently using Aeroshell MIL-23699 spec.

That was the limit for the 10 years I flew at LRAFB, AR, HAFB, HI, and EAFB, AK. Only shutdown an engine 1 time for temp over 100 and that was inflight here in Alaska. If it was going to be hot on the ground we use to open and fix the oil cooler flaps on descent to get the temp at the low end of the limits before landing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A T-56 engine is a T-56 engine no matter how you cut it. You're pretty much stuck with LSGI and advancing the throttle to keep the oil cool - oil cooler flap full open. Limit is with or without augmentation but with augmentation you'll never see the oil get hot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't there a modification to mount some bleed nozzles aft of the oil cooler to create a venturi effect to cool the oil?

Oil Cooler augmentation. Most birds have it now. One of the best things ever added to the 130 if you ask me, great for refueling with engines running on a hot day. I think it was the late 70's they started adding it, but I'll look in the book tonight to check.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

is it normal for engines without augmentation to go beyond 85C at NSGI?

does different brand of eng oil affect the oil temp? anyone did a study regarding this before?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beyond 85c in NGI is not normal - that could be a prop blade angle issue. It usually happens from using a lot of reverse blade angle/thrust while taxiing. Can't speak to any study done on the different type oils.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Engine oil spec. should have no effect on oil temp. The US Air Force C-130 fleet changed from MIL 7808 to MIL 23699 in about 1973/4, primarily because of it's superior lubricating ability. Not aware of a study but have been out of the loop for a long time.

Prior to oil cooler augmentation high oil temp during ground operation was always problematic. Recall when operatiing from airfields at or above 5,000 ft., with oat 100+, time from engine start to takeoff needed to as short as possible or you would be bumping the upper limit. As Raven and George described above common practice was/is to shift to LSGI, advance the throttle a knob. Another method we used was, prior to eng. start manually drive all oil cooler flaps to full open and leave in manual untill prior to takeoff. After landing do the same.

I know it's a massive pita for the FE to reach down and punch the little green button :roll eyes: but don't think there is a better fix. Long term, sounds like your fleet could use oil cooler augmentation.

Raven makes good points above. What he details could certainly be part of the problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I work Convairs 580 with 501-13 engine had the oil cooler augmentation. The aircraft was build in 1957 for the Air Force. To this day

still flying for the FAA.... The system work great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have 2 types of oil coolers in operation: the older type has the full oval frontal

area cooling; and a newer type where the face is square.

Older type cools very well, but has a tendency to high back pressure

Newer type doesn't cool very well, but has great back pressure

My biggest problem is trying to decide which is the greatest evil: oil dumping in

flight, or high oil temp during ground operation ...........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have 2 types of oil coolers in operation: the older type has the full oval frontal

area cooling; and a newer type where the face is square.

Older type cools very well, but has a tendency to high back pressure

Newer type doesn't cool very well, but has great back pressure

My biggest problem is trying to decide which is the greatest evil: oil dumping in

flight, or high oil temp during ground operation ...........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have 2 types of oil coolers in operation: the older type has the full oval frontal

area cooling; and a newer type where the face is square.

Older type cools very well, but has a tendency to high back pressure

Newer type doesn't cool very well, but has great back pressure

My biggest problem is trying to decide which is the greatest evil: oil dumping in

flight, or high oil temp during ground operation ...........

pjvr, I'm going with high oil temp. Pretty scary watching an engine lose 12 gals. of oil overboard in less than a minute. Especially when your at 32,000 flying a route that,s prohibited.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know why the -15's would have different limits, but the -14's have different oil temperature limits than what you described. (I remember ol' Sam from the Rolls Royce school in Indy taught this too...). Anyway, in our NATOPS and maintenance manuals we can operate for 30min in the ground range with oil temp above 100 and 5 min in the Alpha range.

Like I said, I'm confused on why the same motor would have different limits for different applications. Hope this helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check your blade angles...

Make sure your oil tanks are full as more oil will take longer to reach the max temp.

Take a look at your oil coolers and make sure all of the air passages are clear, they like to collect dirt which will prevent air from free flowing...

Other than that your crews are doing the only thing possible to control the oil temp...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...