Jump to content
Aero Precision provides OEM part support for military aircraft operators across more than 20 aircraft

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/18/2019 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    -7 and -17 engines differ in that the turbine section is 3 stage (-7) versus 4 stage in newer versions cant really see any difference from the ground. E models typically have a/c unit scoops flush to the right side fuselage along with a gtc with clam shell doors by the left wheel well. Most H and up models have an a/c scoop that sticks out of the fuselage and right wheel well fairing along with an apu in place of the gtc that has a flap like panel that opens up at an angle when it's operating. And to further confuse you different services have their own avionics set ups.
  2. 1 point
    I started working on "A"s in 68 Naha Okinawa 55-56-57 year serial #s ( 815th, 41st, 35th, and 21st) which had 3 bladed props which were converted to 4 blades in late 70's The "B"s are 4 bladed but no external tanks between 1-2 & 3-4 engines. Worked them in country with the boys from Clark in the P.I. In 85 I joined a reserve unit in P.A. Willow Grove 913th A/W 327th flying Squadron we had "E"s built in 63, they had external tanks between 1-2 & 3-4, the "E"s had HF antennas running from top of fuselage just above crew compartment to below top of rudder. Although some early "H"s had the antenna but they had T-56-15s (Dyess AFB) compared to the "E"s which had T56-7s. Worked on newer "H"s at C-Springs, Pittsburgh, Niagara, Maxwell, Dobbins etc etc and the best way I could tell difference was no wired HF antenna running length of upper fuselage. And od course they were newer looking. But as a Pro Super late in my career I always just checked the forms! Al Udeid 05-06 we had 63 model "E"S and "H"s built in the late 80s early 90s retired Pope 09 we had 87-88 model "H"s.
  3. 1 point
    I remember being in awe of you Loadmasters hustling around all over the cargo compartment putting on and tightening straps while I was thinking I was helping you while trying to make one strap work! I got better as time went on, but I learned to stay out of your way when in-country and time was of essence! I have been wanting to say that for a long time! Ken
  4. 1 point
    Merry Christmas, may it be safe and blessed
  5. 1 point
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/chile-plane-missing-human-remains-and-debris-c-130-hercules-air-force-plane-today-2019-12-12/ Unfortunate, Bird is former KC130R 160628. RIP to crew and pax.
  6. 1 point
    An elderly gentleman went to the local drug store and asked the pharmacist to fill his prescription for Viagra. "How many do you want?" asked the pharmacist. The man replied, "Just a few, maybe half a dozen. I cut each one into four pieces." Upon hearing that, the pharmacist said, "That's too small a dose. That won't get you through sex." The old fellow said, "Oh, I'm past ninety years old and I don't even think about sex anymore. I just want it to stick out enough so I don't pee on my shoes."
  7. 1 point
    I wish I had a nickle for every strap I ever tightened down. I even got three or four surplus straps to tie equipment down on my trailer. I do put the equipment CG just slightly forward of the tandem axle center, but no, I do not make out a Form F every time I load the trailer.
  8. 1 point
    It was Christmas and the judge was in a benevolent mood as he questioned the prisoner. "What are you charged with?" he asked. "Doing my Christmas shopping early," replied the defendant. "That's no offense," replied the judge. "How early were you doing this shopping?" "Before the store opened," countered the prisoner.
  9. 1 point
    One winter morning, an employee explained why he had shown up for work 50 minutes late: “It was so slippery out that for every step I took ahead, I slipped back two.” The boss eyed him suspiciously, “Oh, yeah? Then how did you ever get here?” “I finally gave up,” he said, “and started for home.”
  10. 1 point
    Aircrew assigned to the 189th Operations Group flew to Abbottsford, Canada, Oct. 5, 2019, to participate in the annual Girls Fly Too, Women in Aviation symposium. The all-female crew, including pilots Lt. Col. Kenda Garrett and Maj. Janelle Guillebeau, navigator Lt. Col. Sarah O’Banion, flight engineer Master Sgt. Erin Evans, and loadmasters Tech. Sgt. Nicole Beck and Senior Airman Ashlyn Hendrickson stopped in Colorado Springs on the way up to Canada and picked up the Wings of Blue female jump team along with their jump master and staff. Along with the aircrew, Staff Sgt. Tracie Winston and Staff Sgt. Jessica McGilton, two crew chiefs from the 189th Maintenance Group, accompanied the crew to provide maintenance if necessary. “The jump was challenging,” said Lt. Col. Sarah O’Banion, a 189th navigator and Chief of Safety. “I gotta say, though, we had an awesome all-female 189th Herk crew. We were able to get them at their minimum altitude of 2,500 feet and drop the jump team at their target.” The 189th OG does not have many female aviators in the unit, however, the group was able to gather one full crew to accomplish the mission with their crew chief Staff Sgt. Jessica McGilton, of the 189th Maintenance Group. In a predominately male-oriented career field, the representation of female aviators was created to inspire future female aviatrix. Female aviators, while somewhat commonplace now, were almost unheard of during the early days of aviation. Pioneering women from Amelia Earhart, who was the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, to Brig. Gen. Jeannie Marie Leavitt, the first female fighter pilot in the United States Armed Forces, has established a firm base for young girls who have a dream of flying. During the event, O’Banion expressed that she wanted the young girls attending the event to realize that they are capable of doing anything they want if they are passionate about their dream and put their minds to it. “It was neat seeing a variety of not just girls and their brothers, but a lot of girls who were interested in what we do,” said O’Banion. “It’s not so much of a diversity thing but it employs the fact that they’re seeing women do jobs as normalcy within a male-centric career field. I hope the girls that came out here see us doing this job and realize that it’s not just a male-oriented career field; it’s something that anyone can achieve if they’re passionate about it.” Until World War II, women in the U.S. were barred from flying for the military. During this time the only women pilots that were allowed to fly for the military were civilians known as the Women’s Auxiliary Ferry Squadron also know as WAFS and others representing the Women Air Force Service Pilots or WASP. In Fall of 1942, twenty-eight women aviators were officially designated as WAFS or WASP, earning their civilian pilot training wings at government expense through the civilian pilot training programs at different colleges throughout the U.S. Although this transition was a huge step for women in aviation, it was not until 1970s, during the women’s movement, that females became official military aviators. At present, approximately six percent of the Air Force aviation community is female. Through the hard work, dedication, courage and military training, U.S. military women aviators continue to achieve air equality in the military. Aircrew assigned to the 189th Operations Group flew to Abbottsford, Canada, Oct. 5, 2019, to participate in the annual Girls Fly Too, Women in Aviation symposium. The all-female crew, including pilots Lt. Col. Kenda Garrett and Maj. Janelle Guillebeau, navigator Lt. Col. Sarah O’Banion, flight engineer Master Sgt. Erin Evans, and loadmasters Tech. Sgt. Nicole Beck and Senior Airman Ashlyn Hendrickson stopped in Colorado Springs on the way up to Canada and picked up the Wings of Blue female jump team along with their jump master and staff. Along with the aircrew, Staff Sgt. Tracie Winston and Staff Sgt. Jessica McGilton, two crew chiefs from the 189th Maintenance Group, accompanied the crew to provide maintenance if necessary. Source: https://www.189aw.ang.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/2000585/all-female-c-130h-crew-participates-in-international-air-show/ View full record
  11. 1 point
    If the orifice cups are clogged, you will never be able to accurately check servicing, as the pressurized sump may always show good, but at the expense of the atmospheric sump. The atmospheric sump is allegedly the most accurate location, so if it's inaccurate, it will always lie to you. You should check your tech data for how to clean the orifice cups. The only other option is to replace the pitchlock regulator, preferably with one that was recently overhauled to guarantee the cups are clean. One indication the orifice cups are clogged is that, when you check the pressurized sump after 2 minutes, the fluid fills up and overflows. This is due to the pitchlock regulator keeping the fluid pressurized in the system instead of draining the fluid into the barrel like it's supposed to. Be careful of those who tell you only the pressurized sump is required for an accurate fluid check. This comes from the idea that the pressurized sump dipstick actually gives you a quantity, and the atmospheric sump is only a go/no-go. The only thing the pressurized sump dipstick tells you is how much fluid is in the pressurized sump, who's job is to force-feed the pumps sending the fluid out to the valvehousing. The atmospheric sump dipstick tells you how much is in the barrel AND atmospheric sump. If there's nothing on the atmospheric dipstick, you have no idea how much is in the barrel, and that can be dangerous.
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up
×
×
  • Create New...