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  1. 3 points
    On this day in 1954, marked the first flight of the C-130 Hercules! Some interesting history from Wikipedia: Background and requirements The Korean War showed that World War II-era piston-engine transports—Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcars, Douglas C-47 Skytrains and Curtiss C-46 Commandos—were no longer adequate. Thus, on 2 February 1951, the United States Air Force issued a General Operating Requirement (GOR) for a new transport to Boeing, Douglas, Fairchild, Lockheed, Martin, Chase Aircraft, North American, Northrop, and Airlifts Inc. The new transport would have a capacity of 92 passengers, 72 combat troops or 64 paratroopers in a cargo compartment that was approximately 41 feet (12 m) long, 9 feet (2.7 m) high, and 10 feet (3.0 m) wide. Unlike transports derived from passenger airliners, it was to be designed specifically as a combat transport with loading from a hinged loading ramp at the rear of the fuselage. A key feature was the introduction of the Allison T56 turboprop powerplant, which was developed for the C-130. At the time, the turboprop was a new application of gas turbines, which offered greater range at propeller-driven speeds compared to pure turbojets, which were faster but consumed more fuel. They also produced much more power for their weight than piston engines. Design phase The Hercules resembled a larger four-engine brother to the C-123 Provider with a similar wing and cargo ramp layout that evolved from the Chase XCG-20 Avitruc, which in turn, was first designed and flown as a cargo glider in 1947.[5] The Boeing C-97 Stratofreighter also had a rear ramp, which made it possible to drive vehicles onto the plane (also possible with forward ramp on a C-124). The ramp on the Hercules was also used to airdrop cargo, which included low-altitude extraction for Sheridan tanks and even dropping large improvised "daisy cutter" bombs. The new Lockheed cargo plane design possessed a range of 1,100 nmi (1,270 mi; 2,040 km), takeoff capability from short and unprepared strips, and the ability to fly with one engine shut down. Fairchild, North American, Martin, and Northrop declined to participate. The remaining five companies tendered a total of ten designs: Lockheed two, Boeing one, Chase three, Douglas three, and Airlifts Inc. one. The contest was a close affair between the lighter of the two Lockheed (preliminary project designation L-206) proposals and a four-turboprop Douglas design. The Lockheed design team was led by Willis Hawkins, starting with a 130-page proposal for the Lockheed L-206.[6]Hall Hibbard, Lockheed vice president and chief engineer, saw the proposal and directed it to Kelly Johnson, who did not care for the low-speed, unarmed aircraft, and remarked, "If you sign that letter, you will destroy the Lockheed Company."[6] Both Hibbard and Johnson signed the proposal and the company won the contract for the now-designated Model 82 on 2 July 1951.[7] The first flight of the YC-130 prototype was made on 23 August 1954 from the Lockheed plant in Burbank, California. The aircraft, serial number 53-3397, was the second prototype, but the first of the two to fly. The YC-130 was piloted by Stanley Beltz and Roy Wimmer on its 61-minute flight to Edwards Air Force Base; Jack Real and Dick Stanton served as flight engineers. Kelly Johnson flew chase in a Lockheed P2V Neptune.[8] After the two prototypes were completed, production began in Marietta, Georgia, where over 2,300 C-130s have been built through 2009.[9] The initial production model, the C-130A, was powered by Allison T56-A-9 turboprops with three-blade propellers and originally equipped with the blunt nose of the prototypes. Deliveries began in December 1956, continuing until the introduction of the C-130B model in 1959. Some A-models were equipped with skis and re-designated C-130D. As the C-130A became operational with Tactical Air Command (TAC), the C-130's lack of range became apparent and additional fuel capacity was added with wing pylon-mounted tanks outboard of the engines; this added 6,000 lb of fuel capacity for a total capacity of 40,000 lb.
  2. 2 points
  3. 2 points
    You're welcome. I retire 1 Oct. I certainly miss Bob he was a good friend and a member of the C-130 community. --Casey
  4. 2 points
    The forum will not allow me to post the news clipping pages. You can find the news clippings from the Doc Jensen Story at : http://www.tanwater.com/834/det1-pg4.html And http://www.tanwater.com/834/det1-pg5.html I can testify to the fact that every plane over An Loc came back with bullet holes. I was there. Saved these news clippings from the Det 1 Report. These 2 pages were on Doc Jensen story. Other news clippings I saved are at - http://www.tanwater.com/834/dex2.html#line3
  5. 2 points
    I flew with an old A-model captain when I was an FE with Transafrik in Angola. He enjoyed telling the story of departing somewhere in the very cold icy north. The funny thing is that he departed with the parking brake set and when he landed at Pope AFB (I think), he blew all 4 mains! Before you ask about the anti-skid light, I also asked that question. He said the early A-models had no anti-skid inoperative light. Some of you old heads may remember Bonzo Von Haven -- a legend in the Herc world. Don R.
  6. 1 point
    Lockheed Martin Delivers First HC-130J Combat King II to New York Air National Guard 106th Rescue Wing Recapitalizing Legacy HC-130 Fleet With Four HC-130Js The first HC-130J Commando II assigned to the N.Y. Air National Guard’s 106th Rescue Wing departs Lockheed Martin’s facility in Marietta, Georgia, where all C-130s are built. (Lockheed Martin photo by Todd R. McQueen) "The HC-130 Hercules aircraft has been an essential part of the 106th’s Rescue Wing’s fleet for many decades, supporting these brave Airmen in meeting their mission requirements time and time again.” -Ray Burick MARIETTA, Ga., March 21, 2019 – Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) delivered the first of four HC-130J Combat King II aircraft today to representatives from the New York Air National Guard’s 106th Rescue Wing (RQW). This HC-130J will be operated by the 102nd Rescue Squadron (RQS) at Francis S. Grabreski Air National Guard Base, New York. The 102nd RQS, which is part of the 106th Rescue Wing (RQW), currently operates a legacy fleet of HC-130P/N variant Combat King I aircraft, which will be replaced by four new HC-130Js. The squadron will use its HC-130Js to refuel the New York Air National Guard’s 101st RQS HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters, which were manufactured by Lockheed Martin’s Sikorsky business in Stratford, Connecticut. Like others in the U.S. Air Force Rescue community, the 106th RQW lives by the motto, "That Others May Live," which reflects its mission of supporting combat search and rescue anywhere in the world. Crews from the 106th RQW rely on HC-130s to extend the range of combat search and rescue helicopters by providing air refueling in hostile or contested airspace. Other mission capabilities include performing tactical delivery of pararescue teams, small bundles, zodiac watercraft or four-wheel drive all-terrain vehicles; and providing direct assistance to survivors in advance of a recovery vehicle. "The HC-130 Hercules aircraft has been an essential part of the 106th’s Rescue Wing’s fleet for many decades, supporting these brave Airmen in meeting their mission requirements time and time again,” said Ray Burick, vice president of Domestic Programs for Lockheed Martin’s Air Mobility & Maritime Missions line of business. “The Lockheed Martin team is proud to provide the N.Y. Air National Guard with new HC-130Js that deliver increased power, capability and performance to support their crews in doing what they do best: saving lives and protecting the people they serve.” The HC-130J is the only dedicated fixed-wing personnel recovery platform in the Air Force and Air National Guard. The HC-130J supports missions in adverse weather and geographic environments, including reaching austere locations. The HC-130J is also tasked for airdrop, airland, and helicopter air-to-air refueling and forward-area ground refueling missions. It also supports humanitarian aid operations, disaster response, security cooperation/aviation advisory, emergency aeromedical evacuation and noncombatant evacuation operations. The HC-130J is one of eight production variants of the C-130J Super Hercules, the current production model of the legendary C-130 Hercules aircraft. With 400+ aircraft delivered, the C-130J is the airlifter of choice for 20 nations. The global Super Hercules fleet has more than 1.9 million flight hours of experience supporting almost any mission requirement — any time, any place. The U.S. government operates the largest C-130J Super Hercules fleet in the world. This delivery continues the U.S. government's transition to the C-130J as the common platform across Air Mobility Command, Air Force Special Operations Command, Air Combat Command, U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Marine Corps. The Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve Command currently operate a mixed fleet of C-130J and older Hercules aircraft. Source: https://news.lockheedmartin.com/2019-03-21-Lockheed-Martin-Delivers-First-HC-130J-Combat-King-II-to-New-York-Air-National-Guard
  7. 1 point
  8. 1 point
    A Telephone Salesman telephoned a household, and a four-year-old boy answered. The conversation went thus: Salesman: May I speak to your mother? Boy: She's not here. Salesman: Well, is anyone else there? Boy: My sister. Salesman: O.K., fine. May I speak to her? Boy: I guess so. At this point there was a very long silence on the phone. Then: Boy: Hello? Salesman: It's you. I thought you were going to call your sister. Boy: I did. But I can't get her out of the playpen
  9. 1 point
    Into a Belfast pub comes Paddy Murphy, looking like he'd just been run over by a train. His arm is in a sling, his nose is broken, his face is cut and bruised and he's walking with a limp "What happened to you?" asks Sean, the bartender. " Jamie O'Conner and me had a fight," says Paddy. "That little shit, O'Conner," says Sean, "He couldn't do that to you, he must have had something in his hand." "That he did," says Paddy, "a shovel is what he had, and a terrible lickin' he gave me with it." " Well," says Sean, "you should have defended yourself, didn't you have something in your hand?" That I did," said Paddy. "Mrs. O'Conner's breast, and a thing of beauty it was, but useless in a fight."
  10. 1 point
    For several weeks flight and ground crews have been pecking away at a problem where engine torque, fuel flow and TIT increase when engine anti-icing is turned on. We're not talking 100"lbs of torque here, its over 4000"lb and/or 300 to 500 pph of fuel. Every conceivable component from FCU, speed valve, anti-icing side valves, and the whole TD system has been replaced at least once with no change. Last week the engine was finally removed and sent to test cell. Engine was started, runs great, makes good power, but when anti-icing is turned on there is a massive surge of torq and fuel which the TD barely contains. I had the to see what happens in NULL - instant soil-the-underwear moment as torq jumps from 12500"lb to almost 18000"lb, fuel goes 1600pph to 2000pph, and TIT from 900°C to 1040° ...... I have a small flapper installed over the inlet duct anti-icing vent so we can see when the anti-icing valve opens. This device was working as intended, meaning a/icing on flapper flaps, but ...... massive torq, TIT and FF increases. We eventually shut down the engine without any real idea of how to proceed with troubleshooting. Then I started thinking: what if, somehow, a/icing air is getting into the FCU CIT or CIP lines .... Some examination of diagrams led me to the CIP inlet in the compressor inlet housing. A/icing air is pumped into the same strut as the CIP fitting. If the fitting is corrode, cracked or loose, you'd be dumping 100psi air onto the CIP bellows. Long story short, a really skinny guy was sent up the 'S'-duct and CIP fitting was replaced. VOILA! A/icing no longer causes massive increases in torq, ff, and TIT
  11. 1 point
    That's exactly what I was looking for Mr N1dp. DC Selsyn. Thanks for the link!
  12. 1 point
    A woman noticed her husband standing on the bathroom scale, sucking in his stomach. “Ha­­! That’s not going to help,” she said. “Sure, it does,” he said. “It’s the only way I can see the numbers.”
  13. 1 point
    Ponderings: How come you press harder on a remote-control when you know the battery is dead? Have you ever imagined a world with no hypothetical situations? You know how most packages say "Open here".What is the protocol if the package says, "Open somewhere else"? Since Americans throw rice at weddings do orientals throw hamburgers? Why are they called buildings, when they're already finished? Shouldn't they be called builts? Why are they called apartments, when they're all stuck together? Why do people without out a watch look at their wrist when you ask them what time it is? Why do you ask someone without a watch what time it is? Who is General failure and why is he reading my disk ? The light went out, but where to ? Why do banks charge you a "non-sufficient funds fee" on money they already know you don't have? Why is it you have a "pair" of pants and only one bra? How come when I call Information they can't tell me where my keys are? Why do people go to Burger King and Order a Double Whopper with a Large French Fry and insist on getting a Diet Coke? Does the reverse side also have a reverse side? Why is the alphabet in that order? If the universe is everything, and scientists say that the universe is expanding, what is it expanding into? If you got into a taxi and he started driving backwards, would the taxi driver end up owing you money?
  14. 1 point
    That looks very similar to a pic I usually post. Happy New Year!!!
  15. 1 point
    Happy christmas day to every world hercules member Munir Abbasi on behalf of Muslim community of Pakistan
  16. 1 point
  17. 1 point
    Selling at an auction was halted when the auctioneer announced, “Someone in the room has lost his wallet containing $2,000. He is offering a reward of $500.00 for its immediate return.” After a moment of silence, there was a call from the back of the room, $550.00
  18. 1 point
    Just seeing this post and hoping you have found and made peace with this... Salute Gentlemen; may our brothers in arms rest in peace...
  19. 1 point
    Do any of you old Naha guys remember this book? I have asked about it before, but I called it the Naminoue Kapers due to CRS. Remember the Ryukian Islands were called the Keystone Islands? Anyway two guys named Dick Moore & Frank Mortenson wrote and printed this little book in 1967 and sold it for fifty cents. It has a lot of drawings/cartoons about the night life/girls in the bar districts in Okinawa. If you explored any, you know they were all the same! I just found the one I bought in 1967 and was sure I had owned one. I will eventually post pics of the covers and a few of the inside pages to see if you remember this book. I know that most of you will remember fondly the antics that are illustrated and acted out in the book. It's like a "this happened to me" story. At least for me most of it is humorous and kinda true! I can say, it is not professionally written , but you might have one you need to re-read----if I had bought it before I went downtown, I could have saved many dollars buying drinkee's for the Mitchiko's, and the Kimiko's etc. Also, waiting for the local lovely to meet you outside waiting for your date after the bar closed. Also, "mamasan have meeting, ten more minutes" . Also, the bomb hits when you and a couple other guys are all waiting for the same girl! All of those "drinkee's" you guys paid for on your $90.00 a month salary wasted! Of course if you did this again, you were a real sucker!! Just think of the fun we had during the war!! Ken
  20. 1 point
    A man and a woman were sitting beside each other in the first class section of an airplane. The woman sneezed, took out a tissue, gently wiped her nose, then visibly shuddered for ten to fifteen seconds. The man went back to his reading. A few minutes later, the woman sneezed again, took a tissue, wiped her nose, then shuddered violently once more. Assuming that the woman might have a cold, the man was still curious about the shuddering. A few more minutes passed when the woman sneezed yet again. As before she took a tissue, wiped her nose, her body shaking even more than before. Unable to restrain his curiosity, the man turned to the woman and said, "I couldn't help but notice that you've sneezed three times, wiped your nose and then shuddered violently. Are you ok?" "I am sorry if I disturbed you, I have a very rare medical condition; whenever I sneeze I have an orgasm." The man, more than a bit embarrassed, was still curious. " I have never heard of that condition before" he said. " Are you taking anything for it?" "Yes," the woman nodded. "Pepper."
  21. 1 point
    While there was only 5 of us on the crew it took thousands to get is in and keep us in the air. I want to thank all the Crew Chiefs that made sure we had a good airplane each day. They stayed as log as it took to get the airplane back in the "Green". Thanks to all the MX guys that fixed the planes we "broke". The fuelers that topped us off. The list goes on forever. For ever one of us that had wings there was 50,000 to support us. I especially want to thank the great Pilots that brought me home every night. I was 19 and thought these guys were old men..Most were in their late 20s. Happy veterans day to all of you.
  22. 1 point
    Thanks Billy, and thanks for your service also! I was a crew chief for 31 months in Viet Nam, and a crew member- Loadmaster/Flare Kicker for three months, 40 missions in Blind Bats out of Ubon. I know the feeling of going out to my designated plane for the night knowing I was in a plane pre - flighted by one of my peers. My crew never experienced any aborts or breakdowns on any of the 40 missions. By the way, my crew picture is in my gallery! I hope every one of you guys experience a nice day, Ken
  23. 1 point
    A motorcycle police officer stops a driver for shooting through a red light. The driver is a real jerk, steps out of his car and comes striding toward the officer, demanding to know why he is being harassed by the Gestapo! So the officer calmly tells him of the red light violation. The motorist instantly goes on a tirade, questioning the officer's ancestry, sexual orientation, etc., in rather explicit offensive terms. The tirade goes on without the officer saying anything. When the officer finishes writing the ticket he puts an "AH" in the lower right corner of the narrative portion of the ticket. He then hands it to The 'violator' for his signature. The guy signs the ticket angrily, and when presented with his copy points to the "AH" and demands to know what it stands for. The officer says, "That's so when we go to court, I'll remember that you're an asshole!" Two months later they're in court. The 'violator' has a bad driving record with a high number of points and is in danger of losing his license, so he hired a lawyer to represent him. On the stand the officer testifies to seeing the man run through the red light. Under cross examination the defense attorney asks; "Officer is this a reasonable facsimile of the ticket that you issued to my client?" Officer responds, "Yes, sir, that is the defendant's copy, his signature, and mine, same number at the top." Lawyer: "Officer, is there any particular marking or notation on this ticket you don't normally make?" "Yes, sir, in the lower right corner of the narrative there is an "AH," underlined." "What does the "AH" stand for, officer?" "Aggressive and hostile, Sir." "Aggressive and hostile?" "Yes, Sir." "Officer, are you sure it doesn't stand for asshole?" "Well, Sir, you know your client better than I do."
  24. 1 point
    2 things will happen here: 1- you will lose the commercial (civilian) certification for the D22 2- you will have no fuel flow indication. The T56 engine uses a 28v DC power supply for the ff transmitter and indicators, while the D22 uses a 115v 400hz power supply. The wiring and connectors are completely different. In my opinion this would be a completely wasted excercise, not to mention the expense of recertifying the D22 again
  25. 1 point
    Daddy, I am coming home to get married, soon. Get out your check book. LOL I'm in love with a boy who is far away from me. I am in Australia , and he lives in Scotland . We met on a dating website, became friends on Facebook, had long chats on Whatsapp, he proposed to me on Skype, and now we've had two months of relationship through Viber. My beloved and favorite Dad, I need your blessing, good wishes, and a really big wedding." Lots of love and thanks, Your favorite daughter, Lilly Dad's reply ....also texting My Dear Lilly: Like Wow! Really? Cool! Whatever....., I suggest you two get married on Twitter, have fun on Tango, buy your kids on Amazon, and pay for it all through Paypal. And when you get fed up with this new husband, sell him on Ebay. Love, Dad
  26. 1 point
    I don't have enough info at my fingertips to give a firm yes, I wish I did. It looks good, but have you contacted FMS at WRALC?
  27. 1 point
    Oil Scavenge kit installed all scavenge pressures are with in limit , several ground run carried out but ????
  28. 1 point
    Man and his wife were awakened at 3:00 am by a loud pounding on the door. The man gets up and goes to the door where a drunken stranger, standing in the pouring rain, is asking for a push. "Not a chance," says the husband, "it is 3:00 in the morning!" He slams the door and returns to bed. "Who was that?" asked his wife.. "Just some drunk guy asking for a push," he answers.... "Did you help him?" she asks. "No, I did not, it's 3 am in the morning and it's bloomin' well pouring with rain out there!" "Well, you have a short memory," says his wife. "Can't you remember about three months ago when we broke down, and those two guys helped us? I think you should help him, and you should be ashamed of yourself! God loves drunk people too you know." The man does as he is told, gets dressed, and goes out into the pounding rain. He calls out into the dark, "Hello, are you still there?" "Yes," comes back the answer. "Do you still need a push?" calls out the husband. "Yes, please!" comes the reply from the dark. "Where are you?" asks the husband. "Over here on the swing," replied the drunk.. HEHE
  29. 1 point
    OK, Tiny. Tell them how to fix it.
  30. 1 point
    Q. When is a retiree's bedtime? A. Three hours after he falls asleep on the couch. Q. How many retirees does it take to change a light bulb? A. Only one, but it might take all day. Q. What's the biggest gripe of retirees? A. There is not enough time to get everything done. Q. Why don't retirees mind being called senior citizens? A. The term comes with a 10% discount. Q. Among retirees what is considered formal attire? A. Tied shoes. Q. Why do retirees count pennies? A. They are the only ones who have the time. Q. What is the common term for someone who enjoys work and refuses to retire? A. NUTS! Q. Why are retirees so slow to clean out the basement, attic or garage? A. They know that as soon as they do, one of their adult kids will want to store stuff there. Q. What do retirees call a long lunch? A. Normal Q. What is the best way to describe retirement? A. The never-ending Coffee Break. Q. What's the biggest advantage of going back to school as a retiree? A. If you cut classes, no one calls your parents. Q. Why does a retiree often say he doesn't miss work, but misses the people he used to work with? A. He is too polite to tell the whole truth
  31. 1 point
    Heard the other day that YMC-130H # 74-1686 (c/n 4669) located at Robins has had a museum express interest in acquiring the aircraft for a museum display. No word on the specific museum; just good to see something happen to it besides sitting in the elements and being used for battle damage repair practice.
  32. 1 point
    A German tourist walks into a McDonald's in New York City and orders a beer. (In Germany and many parts of Europe, McDonald's actually does serve beer.) The local guy in the line behind him immediately gives him the jab: "They don't serve BEER here, you MORON!" The German fellow felt pretty stupid, but suddenly turns to the New Yorker with a surprised look, and begins to chuckle. "And what's so funny?!?" the New Yorker demands. "Oh, nothing really, I just realized that you came here for the food."
  33. 1 point
    An elderly pair (he a widower, she a widow) meet in a retirement village. They seem to hit it off; they share each others values, enjoy the same jokes, and find pleasure in each others company. After a few months, the widower asks for the hand of the widow in marriage. She appears hesitant and decided to probe her soon-to-be a little. "Perhaps I shouldn't look a gift horse in the mouth, but... How's your health?" "It's OK", he answers. "I'm not getting any younger, but I don't have any major health problems. I can still enjoy life". "Well, then", she replies "I don't want to be a snoop, but I've got to protect myself: how are you fixed financially?" "So-so. I'm not rich, but I'm comfortable. You don't have to worry about me sponging off you; I can support myself". The little old lady blushes, and finally asks her swain - "And how's your sex life...." "Infrequently", he declares. The widow ponders this for a moment or so, before asking... "And is that one word or two?
  34. 1 point
    When I go to casinos, the most ridiculous sign I see is the one that says: "If you have a gambling problem, call 1-800-GAMBLER." I thought about it for a moment and dialed the number. When they answered I said, "I have an ace and a six. The dealer has a seven. What do I do?"
  35. 1 point
    Manual Override Control. The flow control and shutoff valve contains a manual override feature. It allows continued operation of the 30 pounds per minute schedule or shutoff schedule in case the solenoid malfunctions.
  36. 1 point
    Sorry Ken, I read the thread to fast thought it was your birthday, but Happy Birthday anyway.
  37. 1 point
    On this day in 1954, marked the first flight of the C-130 Hercules! On this day, 23 August 1954, Lockheed pilots Stanley Beltz and Roy Wimmer flew the Hercules YC-130 transport on its first flight. Background and requirements The Korean War showed that World War II-era piston-engine transports—Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcars, Douglas C-47 Skytrains and Curtiss C-46 Commandos—were no longer adequate. Thus, on 2 February 1951, the United States Air Force issued a General Operating Requirement (GOR) for a new transport to Boeing, Douglas, Fairchild, Lockheed, Martin, Chase Aircraft, North American, Northrop, and Airlifts Inc. The new transport would have a capacity of 92 passengers, 72 combat troops or 64 paratroopers in a cargo compartment that was approximately 41 feet (12 m) long, 9 feet (2.7 m) high, and 10 feet (3.0 m) wide. Unlike transports derived from passenger airliners, it was to be designed specifically as a combat transport with loading from a hinged loading ramp at the rear of the fuselage. A key feature was the introduction of the Allison T56 turboprop powerplant, which was developed for the C-130. At the time, the turboprop was a new application of gas turbines, which offered greater range at propeller-driven speeds compared to pure turbojets, which were faster but consumed more fuel. They also produced much more power for their weight than piston engines. Design phase The Hercules resembled a larger four-engine brother to the C-123 Provider with a similar wing and cargo ramp layout that evolved from the Chase XCG-20 Avitruc, which in turn, was first designed and flown as a cargo glider in 1947.[5] The Boeing C-97 Stratofreighter also had a rear ramp, which made it possible to drive vehicles onto the plane (also possible with forward ramp on a C-124). The ramp on the Hercules was also used to airdrop cargo, which included low-altitude extraction for Sheridan tanks and even dropping large improvised "daisy cutter" bombs. The new Lockheed cargo plane design possessed a range of 1,100 nmi (1,270 mi; 2,040 km), takeoff capability from short and unprepared strips, and the ability to fly with one engine shut down. Fairchild, North American, Martin, and Northrop declined to participate. The remaining five companies tendered a total of ten designs: Lockheed two, Boeing one, Chase three, Douglas three, and Airlifts Inc. one. The contest was a close affair between the lighter of the two Lockheed (preliminary project designation L-206) proposals and a four-turboprop Douglas design. The Lockheed design team was led by Willis Hawkins, starting with a 130-page proposal for the Lockheed L-206.[6]Hall Hibbard, Lockheed vice president and chief engineer, saw the proposal and directed it to Kelly Johnson, who did not care for the low-speed, unarmed aircraft, and remarked, "If you sign that letter, you will destroy the Lockheed Company."[6] Both Hibbard and Johnson signed the proposal and the company won the contract for the now-designated Model 82 on 2 July 1951.[7] The first flight of the YC-130 prototype was made on 23 August 1954 from the Lockheed plant in Burbank, California. The aircraft, serial number 53-3397, was the second prototype, but the first of the two to fly. The YC-130 was piloted by Stanley Beltz and Roy Wimmer on its 61-minute flight to Edwards Air Force Base; Jack Real and Dick Stanton served as flight engineers. Kelly Johnson flew chase in a Lockheed P2V Neptune.[8] After the two prototypes were completed, production began in Marietta, Georgia, where over 2,300 C-130s have been built through 2009.[9] The initial production model, the C-130A, was powered by Allison T56-A-9 turboprops with three-blade propellers and originally equipped with the blunt nose of the prototypes. Deliveries began in December 1956, continuing until the introduction of the C-130B model in 1959. Some A-models were equipped with skis and re-designated C-130D. As the C-130A became operational with Tactical Air Command (TAC), the C-130's lack of range became apparent and additional fuel capacity was added with wing pylon-mounted tanks outboard of the engines; this added 6,000 lb of fuel capacity for a total capacity of 40,000 lb.
  38. 1 point
    I don't remember where I saw this, but it's interesting. Displayed at the USAF Museum. Check out the rank of the first FE.
  39. 1 point
    Three buddies die in a car crash, and they go to heaven to an orientation. They are all asked, "When you are in your casket and friends and family are mourning upon you, what would you like to hear them say about you? The first guy says, "I would like to hear them say that I was a great doctor of my time, and a great family man." The second guy says, "I would like to hear that I was a wonderful husband and school teacher which made a huge difference in our children of tomorrow." The last guy replies, "I would like to hear them say, "Look! He's moving!"
  40. 1 point
    I think about a year. Bill
  41. 1 point
    We recover the problem by replacing the anti skid valve....it was found faulty during before taxi check
  42. 1 point
    I apologize if my question offended you. I grew up as a military USAF brat and have lived all over the world. I have never heard that term used in maintenance terms, so just wanted to know what part of the world "snag"comes from. Also, I am an Avionics dude, not engines. And, I have to add, grow some thicker skin. Aircraft maintainers don't get offended by anything really. Good luck solving your problem.
  43. 1 point
    https://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/i-guess-this-is-how-you-fit-a-c-130-in-a-parking-lot-1827304608
  44. 1 point
  45. 1 point
    The Plan In the beginning was the Plan. And then came the Assumptions. And the Assumptions were without form. And the Plan was without substance. And darkness was upon the face of the Workers. And they spoke among themselves, saying, "It is a crock of s%@#, and it stinks." And the Workers went unto their Supervisors and said, "It is a pail of dung, and we can't live with the smell. And the Supervisors went unto their Managers, saying, "It is the container of the excrements, and it is very strong, such that none may abide by it." And the Mangers went unto their Directors, saying, "It is a vessel of fertilizer, and none may abide its strength." And the Directors spoke among themselves, saying to one another, "It promotes growth, and it is very powerful." And the Vice Presidents went to the President, saying unto him, "This new plan will actively promote the growth and vigor of the company with very powerful effects." And the President looked upon the Plan and saw that it was good. And the Plan became Policy. And that is how s%@# happens.
  46. 1 point
    Our C130H also has same problem and we have been battling to solve the problem. It's still there .....
  47. 1 point
    Here is a link to Hi-Shear's website with all the fastener data for these BN's. Click on the highlighted link titled, " See Blind fasteners Flat Table" at the top RH of the page. http://www.lisi-aerospace.com/products/fasteners/blind-fasteners/Pages/default.aspx
  48. 1 point
    I'm assuming a BARV is a Bleed Air Regulator Valve, and when you say "accompanied of TIT", you mean TIT dropped with torque, and not increased. The TD Amp's job is not to maintain power, but to maintain temperature based on the throttle setting. If the TIT is low while the TD Amp is in AUTO, then there is an error with a signal being supplied to the TD Amp, or there is an error with the Amp itself, a setting or malfunction, When you lose air, you lose power for two reasons. Jet engines love more air, both to increase power through expansion, and also to keep the combustion chamber cool. If you lose air, you lose power immediately since there is less air to expand, but also the loss of cooling air causes an increase in TIT, and results in the TD Amp to pull fuel back. This all produces a loss of torque and fuel flow while maintaining TIT. I cannot emphasize this enough, before doing anything, ensure your indications are accurate! TIT to within 6 degrees of actual as measured with a test set and all thermocouples verified good and connected properly. Torque indicator recalibrated and set to within 50 in-lbs of actual. Swap the Fuel Flow gauge with a known good one for good measure, then reverify the problem. Why the engine goes to normal when the Regulator Valve gets turned off is interesting. If the TIT was to remain normal, I would say the Regulator Valve was mis-tuned and the TD Amp was doing its job. Since the TIT is also low, we know the TD Amp is not doing its job (above crossover only). Even if the Regulator was malfunctioning, the TD Amp is definitely having an issue. The fact that the valve affects the TD System operation means they may be connected electrically in some way, like the power/signal wires may be chafing together. If the fuel control was perfectly tuned and we suspected the TD Amp was just inop, we would see high TIT with bleed air open, not low TIT. To check if it is an electrical problem, check power going to the TD Amp using a TD Amp Test Set, then cycle the bleed air valve and see if the power at the Amp changes. There are two types of power going to the Amp, so check them both. If I misunderstood you, and the TIT is high during the malfunction, and not low, then you have a TD Amp malfunction AND a bleed air regulating valve balance issue causing you to lose 2500 in-lbs.
  49. 1 point
    Aircraft Air Conditioning Pressurization is INOP in AUTO during flight. On takeoff aircraft will pressurize at an usafe rate (Pressure rate spikes) when commanded to No Press, Aircraft continues to pressurize. Aircraft can be depressurized in MANUAL, but crew also noted in NO PRESS that safety valve remained closed. Every component in the system has been changed including: Outflow Valve, Safety Valve, Servo Valve, Cabin Pressure Controller, Jet Pump has been inspected and cleaned. All hard lines to safety valve and outflow valve have been inspected for integrity. Also on the ground the system always OPS CHECKS good. Any ideas? BTW this a KC-130J series Aircraft.
  50. 1 point
    Replace the pressure control mounted on OH Munir Abbasi
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