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Metalbasher

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Everything posted by Metalbasher

  1. Nevada Air Guard upgrades C-130 fleet November 30, 2015 (by TSgt. Emerson Marcus) - For the second time in its history the 152nd Airlift Wing has upgraded its entire fleet of C-130 Hercules aircraft just as the U.S. Air Force seeks total fleet modernization in the face of nearing federal upgrade deadlines. “It is a significant upgrade and it should help increase mission capability with more reliable equipment,” said Col. Karl Stark, commander of the 152nd. By early 2016, the 152nd — known as the “High Rollers” of the Nevada Air National Guard — will have acquired each of its six C-130 H3 models and two H2.5 models. These models are about a decade newer with nearly 10,000 fewer flight hours than the unit’s previous C-130 H2 models manufactured more than 30 years ago. The incoming models also include new wing boxes. Along with increased longevity as a result of fewer flight hours, the newer models — manufactured in the late-1980s and 1990s — include upgraded engines with digital flight instruments and fuel gauges. The unit’s previous aircraft included analog instruments. The majority of those aircraft are being dispersed to units around the country to make room for the new aircraft in Reno. The upgrade comes just as the U.S. Air Force seeks modernization of its C-130 fleet. The Air National Guard accounts for 40 percent of the Air Force’s total C-130s at locations in states around the nation. But Federal Aviation Administration mandates demand new avionics beginning in 2020. This will leave several units without upgrades necessary to enter air space, including the Nevada Air National Guard’s aircraft. Among upgrades needed are new radios, a digital flight recorder and enhanced air traffic alert system. “They want to modernize the C-130 fleet, but which ones are you going to do it to?” said Senior Master Sgt. Cameron Pieters, a flight engineer with the unit. “Are you going to do it to the oldest ones or the newest ones? For the Nevada Air National Guard to get ahold of the newer ones, that’s definitely a good thing.” Several of the aircraft have already arrived and been adorned with a revised tail flash that updates the font for the “High Rollers” moniker. “It’s exciting for our Airmen to work with more advanced technology,” Stark said. This marks the 152nd’s second C-130 upgrade in its history. The unit transitioned in 1995 from a tactical reconnaissance mission with F-4 aircraft to an airlift support mission with C-130s. The first C-130s that arrived in Reno in 1996 were E models. Some of those aircraft were manufactured in the 1960s. In 2002, the 152nd received H2 models, primarily made in the late-1970s and 1980s. For more than 60 years, the Lockheed Martin-manufactured C-130 has earned the reputation as the workhorse of military aircraft, adept at dirt strip takeoff, troop dropping and supporting humanitarian aid missions. The 152nd Airlift Wing includes about 1,000 Airmen stationed at the Nevada Air National Guard Base in Reno. Hundreds of Nevada Guard Airmen have deployed overseas to Southwest Asia and around the world for tactical air delivery missions and expeditionary combat support with the unit’s C-130s. Additionally, the aircraft is capable of executing domestic missions for cargo transportation, search and rescue and emergency response support during natural disasters. “It’s bittersweet,” Pieters said of having to say goodbye to C-130s he’s worked on for more than a decade. “For me, I started out working on the E models. I got to know and love those airplanes. To watch them go away, it’s kind of sad.” “But we’re going to extend the longevity of our fleet based on airframe hours alone. That’s good for the Nevada Guard and it’s good for the community.” Courtesy of Nevada Joint Force Headquarters Public Affairs Col. Karl Stark, commander of the 152nd AW, applies a new “High Rollers” tail flash on the recently-acquired C-130H3 #93-7311 on October 30, 2015. The 152nd AW is set to acquire all eight of its upgraded C-130s by early next year. It’s the second time in the unit’s history that the fleet has been upgraded since the unit transitioned from F-4 jets to C-130s in 1996.[Courtesy photo]
  2. Yes, severe corrosion is what initiated Patrick's aircraft's early induction to AMARG.
  3. November 30, 2015 (by TSgt. Emerson Marcus) - For the second time in its history the 152nd Airlift Wing has upgraded its entire fleet of C-130 Hercules aircraft just as the U.S. Air Force seeks total fleet modernization in the face of nearing federal upgrade deadlines. “It is a significant upgrade and it should help increase mission capability with more reliable equipment,” said Col. Karl Stark, commander of the 152nd. By early 2016, the 152nd — known as the “High Rollers” of the Nevada Air National Guard — will have acquired each of its six C-130 H3 models and two H2.5 models. These models are about a decade newer with nearly 10,000 fewer flight hours than the unit’s previous C-130 H2 models manufactured more than 30 years ago. The incoming models also include new wing boxes. Along with increased longevity as a result of fewer flight hours, the newer models — manufactured in the late-1980s and 1990s — include upgraded engines with digital flight instruments and fuel gauges. The unit’s previous aircraft included analog instruments. The majority of those aircraft are being dispersed to units around the country to make room for the new aircraft in Reno. The upgrade comes just as the U.S. Air Force seeks modernization of its C-130 fleet. The Air National Guard accounts for 40 percent of the Air Force’s total C-130s at locations in states around the nation. But Federal Aviation Administration mandates demand new avionics beginning in 2020. This will leave several units without upgrades necessary to enter air space, including the Nevada Air National Guard’s aircraft. Among upgrades needed are new radios, a digital flight recorder and enhanced air traffic alert system. “They want to modernize the C-130 fleet, but which ones are you going to do it to?” said Senior Master Sgt. Cameron Pieters, a flight engineer with the unit. “Are you going to do it to the oldest ones or the newest ones? For the Nevada Air National Guard to get ahold of the newer ones, that’s definitely a good thing.” Several of the aircraft have already arrived and been adorned with a revised tail flash that updates the font for the “High Rollers” moniker. “It’s exciting for our Airmen to work with more advanced technology,” Stark said. This marks the 152nd’s second C-130 upgrade in its history. The unit transitioned in 1995 from a tactical reconnaissance mission with F-4 aircraft to an airlift support mission with C-130s. The first C-130s that arrived in Reno in 1996 were E models. Some of those aircraft were manufactured in the 1960s. In 2002, the 152nd received H2 models, primarily made in the late-1970s and 1980s. For more than 60 years, the Lockheed Martin-manufactured C-130 has earned the reputation as the workhorse of military aircraft, adept at dirt strip takeoff, troop dropping and supporting humanitarian aid missions. The 152nd Airlift Wing includes about 1,000 Airmen stationed at the Nevada Air National Guard Base in Reno. Hundreds of Nevada Guard Airmen have deployed overseas to Southwest Asia and around the world for tactical air delivery missions and expeditionary combat support with the unit’s C-130s. Additionally, the aircraft is capable of executing domestic missions for cargo transportation, search and rescue and emergency response support during natural disasters. “It’s bittersweet,” Pieters said of having to say goodbye to C-130s he’s worked on for more than a decade. “For me, I started out working on the E models. I got to know and love those airplanes. To watch them go away, it’s kind of sad.” “But we’re going to extend the longevity of our fleet based on airframe hours alone. That’s good for the Nevada Guard and it’s good for the community.” Courtesy of Nevada Joint Force Headquarters Public Affairs Col. Karl Stark, commander of the 152nd AW, applies a new “High Rollers” tail flash on the recently-acquired C-130H3 #93-7311 on October 30, 2015. The 152nd AW is set to acquire all eight of its upgraded C-130s by early next year. It’s the second time in the unit’s history that the fleet has been upgraded since the unit transitioned from F-4 jets to C-130s in 1996.[Courtesy photo] View full article
  4. I'd like to see the aircraft too...hearing from the crew/seeing some of the video (you know they video for OT&E/DT&E) would be good too. Time will tell regarding the static display but it's already been written off as a total loss. I'm sure there is a fairly large "save" list of parts and components that can be salvaged for use on other J models (given the USAF's limited supply of spare parts). I guess a lot will be determined how it is dispositioned with regard to what parts can cannot be used; people are funny about using parts off crashed aircraft, although this was not crashed, it was involved in an "incident". If they can in fact "save" parts, i.e. engines, doors, flight controls etc, it might prove difficult at this time to fill in the voids of the missing parts. If they cannot "save" parts, that might be a different story and it might go on display a lot earlier than anyone intended on having a AC-130J on display.
  5. For consolidation purposes, I have copied the post in this thread to the "First AC-130J Prototype Declared Loss" news article/forum post here: http://www.c-130hercules.net/forums/topic/8166-c-130-news-first-ac-130j-prototype-declared-loss/#comment-34836 --Casey
  6. Investigators declared the first prototype AC-130J Ghostrider gunship a total loss after the airframe was severely overstressed after departing controlled flight during a test sortie from Eglin AFB, Fla., officials announced. As a result of the incident, "the mishap aircraft exceeded its design limit load to an extent that rendered it unsafe for flight and is considered a total loss to the Air Force," according to Air Force Materiel Command's Accident Investigation Board report, released on Nov. 6. The crew was performing a high-angle, side-slip at Eglin AFB, Fla., during handling tests of the developmental gunship when the aircraft departed controlled flight at 15,000 feet over the Gulf of Mexico, according to the AIB. The AC-130J "tumbled inverted" before test pilots were able to recover controlled flight, entering a vertical dive, on April 21. The aircraft lost 5,000 feet altitude, pulled 3.19 Gs, and oversped the flaps' maximum allowed airspeed by 100 knots before returning to level flight. The AIB determined the pilot's excessive rudder input and failure to quickly recover from uncontrolled flight were the primary cause of the mishap. Problems with the aircraft's warning system, pilot disorientation, confusion from being hit with unsecured equipment, and inadequate technical guidance also contributed to the mishap. The aircraft, serial number 09-5710, also suffered a similar incident in February, and has been grounded since the April mishap. A second AC-130J prototype was delivered to commence operational testing at nearby Hurlburt Field, Fla., in July. Loss of the aircraft is estimated at $115.6 million. View original article at AirForceMagazine.com View full article
  7. 57-0478 inside the Museum of Aviation at Robins...
  8. Any idea what damage occurred to 79-0478?
  9. Bob I seem to recall that 1597, 1598 and one more at Yokota in the early 90s were SOL II and they were all referred to as Super Es too. Remember the third #?
  10. The green material you are referring to is call TPC...temporary protective coating. It's applied at the manufacturer's location and is meant to provide protection to the aluminum skins until such time when the entire aircraft assembly is ready for paint. Paint shop will remove the TPC prior to starting the primer/topcoat application process with a simple alkaline wash. Typically all manufacturer's use/mandate a TPC during the manufacturing process but different manufacturer's use different TPC. Boeing uses a a product with a green tint to it, LMCO uses an orange tinted material etc.
  11. Not likely to see the YMC-130 that was modified for Project Credible Sport...it was moved from the Museum area (open to the public) to the Warrior Air Base/EDMXS Training area (not open to the public) last year. There are also bits and pieces located inside the museum, forward fuselage for demo purposes etc.
  12. It's a wonder they didn't push it to the main gate at Hurby for display...just put a P model and Talon I out there, why not add the Talon II now vs. later.
  13. The Fed Std 595 color numbers for the Proud AMC image (where we transitioned from Sea Foam Green to Blue and Tan) are Beige - # 23531 (semi-gloss) Blue - # 25414 (semi-gloss) You can google Fed Std 595 and actually see color swatches on line. We used Sherwin Williams latex paint (5-gal buckets) when we did refurb on C-141s. I'm sure you can still get the latex (if desired) or other types, i.e. lacquer, polyurethane etc. Most car paint shops should be able to mix it for you with just the Fed Std 595 color above and whatever size package, i.e. pint, quart etc. Good thing is that if you are slightly off in shade, it shouldn't be too big of deal since you are repainting the entire seat and not touching it up/trying to match and existing paint.
  14. Metalbasher

    64-4859

    Yes it was the TC-H. It left DM and went to Waco and was sitting out there being used every so often for flight training and a little flight test bed stuff until they EC program was given an unmodified acft to be used as a true flying test bed. Just curious, when was this photo taken? I was out at Waco Aug 2014 and it was still sitting there at Waco (waiting for final disposition).
  15. Bob check out the Historical Forum...someone has posted a pix of 64-14859 sitting in AMARG. Not sure when the pix was taken though.
  16. My official list from July 2015 no longer lists an E model.
  17. The original sea foam green is Fed Std 595 color number 34424 (should be able to go to any number of places and have them mix it up for you...should even be able to get latex. It may appear blue because in the early 90s, the USAF went to what was called the "Proud AMC Image" which transitioned away from the European 1 exterior paint scheme to the Equipment Excellence system (still in use today). At the same time, they changed the colors of the interior from sea foam green to a blue and tan...I can dig at home tonight to see if I still have the color #s but painting it sea foam green is the more accurate color.
  18. Been back and forth to Yokota a few times, Dyess, Elmo and LR but never a MAFFS acft or to Wyoming.
  19. I'd be curious as to how much fuel would really get to the underfloor area and eventually the flapper valves given the floor panels, D-rings etc are all sealed during installation. Even with the use of Av-DEC tape, there is a requirement for a fillet seal on the floor panels. Different story on J models though, especially if equipped with ECHS (roller conveyor storage in the floor), then fuel or any liquid for that matter will fill the underfloor structure.
  20. AMC has workcards listed in AMCI 21-118, refurb cards for E/H models. LR has something locally for J and the contractor at Hurlburt works off something local. At one time there were official Refurb Workcards, similar to HSC and ISO workcards, that's what I'm looking for. I believe they went away in the early 90s after Desert Shield/Desert Storm when the ops tempo increased due to the long standing efforts in PSAB and other locations.
  21. Does anyone remember what TO the C-130 Refurb Workcards were, i.e. 1C-130A-6WC-xx? Additionally, trying to find a set of these cards if anyone has a set. Thanks Scott
  22. The one in the pix I'm pretty sure is USCG #1721...it had the gray and white paint scheme. USCG 1708 had the newer USCG orange and white paint scheme. The plan was to remove the USCG markings off #1721 and let it go with the existing paint scheme (to be repainted later) so that would appear is what happened.
  23. 7/10/2015 - ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. -- A fourth C-130H Hercules was delivered June 20 at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, and its significance can be traced back to planners, program managers, engineers and maintainers at Robins. Prior to its delivery to the Afghan Air Force, it first made a stop here for something quite interesting and unique - the complete separation of the aircraft's nose from its fuselage in March 2014. The move to build a C-130 fleet in support of the AAF - which received its first two C-130s in the fall of 2013 - will bring increased tactical airlift capabilities for troops engaged in various missions, as well as resupply and casualty evacuation capabilities. The new fleet of four C-130s is a complete departure from anything the Afghan Air Force has owned before, according to Lt. Col. Tyler Faulk, Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan's Security Assistance Office deputy director. "These C-130s are the Afghan Air Force's first four-engine aircraft with this type of expanded capability," he said. "This fleet allows them to transport supplies or troops within Afghanistan, as well as to partner nations where they can execute missions, trainings and exercises, and a whole host of international activities." With Robins' support, the 560th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, which includes more than 800 personnel, along with the 402nd Aircraft Maintenance Support Squadron and 339th Flight Test Squadron, successfully completed 2,890 maintenance operations and logged over 17,904 labor hours on the aircraft. Among those operations were the removal and replacement of the entire nose assembly, accomplishing inspections and maintenance tasks necessary to make the aircraft flight worthy. It also included painting the aircraft, and accomplishing the functional test flight. Because of a hard landing experienced by the C-130H, major structural damage occurred to the aircraft's nose, which was later removed and replaced with a nose from a second donor aircraft that was scheduled to be retired. This unscheduled depot level maintenance nose repair was disassembled at the factory break, and took about three weeks, with the final nose separation taking place in about 90 minutes. "This team took two 1974 model aircraft that were slated for retirement and built a combat ready aircraft to support our foreign military sales partners," said Jim Russell, 560th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron director. "Our maintenance professionals took on this never before performed task and excelled. This just goes to prove the professionals at the Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex are force multipliers who are willing and ready to support when the call of duty comes our way." The C-130's versatility, including its short takeoff and landing capabilities, makes it an ideal aircraft for use in Afghanistan's rugged terrain. Posted 7/10/2015 by Jenny Gordon Robins Public Affairs View original article... View full article
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