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Metalbasher

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Everything posted by Metalbasher

  1. So not all Hs were configured to carry pylons on the outboard wing stations? I thought they had the capability (hard points installed, wiring harnesses etc).
  2. May or may not still have a DEW line but the HH-60s at Elmo got short legs with a lot of ground to cover so they will need refuel support.
  3. From AFA Daily Report, 13 Jan Air Force Reserve Command's 920th Rescue Wing at Patrick AFB, Fla., recently retired its last legacy HC-130 King search and rescue support aircraft, the unit announced. The unit's six heavily used HC-130P/N airframes were grounded last year due to corrosion and would have required an expensive and time-consuming depot-level overhaul to continue in service, AFRC leadership acknowledged. The aircraft will be back-filled by less-worn HC-130s made available by the ongoing recapitalization of the Active Duty fleet with new-build HC-130J Combat King IIs, according to a unit release. "We are excited about receiving our newer [slightly used] aircraft and making them a part of the family," said 920th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Commander Maj. Stephen Young. The last of Patrick's former fleet, serial number 65-00976, departed for the boneyard after several hours' delay to replace an engine on Sept. 9, 2015. The aircraft accumulated more than 16,000 flight hours before retiring to storage.
  4. It's already gone. Last acft transferred in Nov.
  5. Initially they went to the AFRC operational unit at LR but when the decision was made to deactivate the AFRC, I guess you could say that common sense came into play and they just moved them to the ANG ramp, where the ANG is the Legacy Training unit for USAF.
  6. 204 & 205 are at Little Rock in the 189th ANG now...the AFRC unit was deactivating when I was there in Nov 2015
  7. Don't think so...I know last year I had the password and downloaded them to my computer and still required the password. Not saying it cannot be done but I'm not that computer savvy. LMCO just started locking them down in 2014...prior to that they were all open on the webpage. Even HOC attendees need the password but typically if you registered/attended, a notification was sent out a few weeks after letting you know presentations were posted and the password.
  8. USAF has 24 H2.5s...LMCO #s 5242-5289 (not all inclusive). All were delivered between 91 and 92. Didn't have anything to do with flush toilet as those were implemented on USAF acft in 1983.
  9. Metalbasher

    PDM

    L-3 @ Waco does PDM on EC-130Hs. Robins and Hill do USAF PDM on C-130s while Tinker does perform Depot depaint and repaint on C-130s (primarily overflow from Hill/Robins). E-City does PDM for USCG although they sub out the depaint and repaint to commercial facilities. I believe Cherry Point does some PDM work for USN/USMC acft, I believe Hill is doing USMC and USN work as well. AMARG was doing PDM but stopped a few years ago. Kaiser (formerly PEMCO and Alabama Aircraft Company in AL) were doing some work but they went out of business a few years ago...not sure what is happening there now.
  10. The Air Force Reserve has responded to allegations that the 440th Airlift Wing was being inactivated through attrition. The allegations arose earlier this month, after members of the unit said they felt they were being hidden ahead of Operation Toy Drop, a large airborne operation that's part multinational training exercise, part toy drive. Airmen and civilian officials close to them alleged the Air Force was discouraging members of the unit from speaking out against the 440th's pending inactivation and going behind Congress' back in making the unit unable to complete its mission to support Fort Bragg soldiers. The allegations led to at least two letters from elected leaders to Air Force commanders. In response, Air Force Reserve Command at Robins Air Force Base in Georgia said $52 million has been set aside to ensure the 440th Airlift Wing and its airmen are viable to the end of the fiscal year, when the unit is set to be inactivated. Officials also challenged allegations that airmen were being left behind, with many expected to go on the inactive Reserve, thus losing several benefits, without the unit. "The Air Force Reserve goes to great lengths to assist Reservists in their career decisions," officials said, citing a clearinghouse meant to find new jobs for 440th airmen. "Every effort is being made to assist our personnel in continuing their careers." The three-star command said the Air Force, including active, Reserve and Guard units, would be able to support Fort Bragg without the hometown unit, which has the only C-130s at the "Home of the Airborne." Officials did not provide a cost estimate for what it would take for outside units to fill in for the 440th Airlift Wing, instead saying that missions are "not based solely on cost." Outside units "need to fly those missions to maintain proficiency," officials said. But money does still have a role behind the inactivation. "Sequestration budgets required the Air Force to reduce spending by $20 billion, thus driving the decision to close the 440th Wing," officials said. Officials also confirmed that Lt. Gen. James "JJ" Jackson, the Chief of the Air Force Reserve, had to delay plans to visit Fort Bragg to speak with local leaders. Instead, the deputy chief of the Air Force Reserve will be on post this week, they said. Jackson "plans to make another trip as soon as his schedule permits," officials added. View original article at fayobserver.com View full article
  11. Airman dies following training mission Kyle Daly, kjdaly@guampdn.com 11:55 p.m. ChST December 14, 2015 (Photo: US Air Force 374th Airlift Wing) A Japan-based U.S. airman died Sunday at Andersen Air Force Base, following a training mission, according to the military. The airman “was found unresponsive during post flight inspections,” an Air Force press release states. The cause of death is under investigation. The service member was from the 374th Airlift Wing based at Yokota Air Base in Japan. Yokota airmen were on island to take part in the annual Operation Christmas Drop, air dropping gifts to 56 of the region’s remote, hard-to-reach islands. In addition to the Yokota crew, Andersen airmen were joined by the Japan Air Self-Defense Force and Royal Australian Air Force in the humanitarian aid and disaster relief training, which ended Monday. The military has yet to publicly release the service member’s identity. The military will withhold the identity until 24 hours after notification of next of kin.
  12. Railrunner130...I'm not sure, I just posted the article...didn't have any input to creating it.
  13. Railrunner130...I'm not sure, I just posted the article...didn't have any input to creating it.
  14. Nevada Air Guard upgrades C-130 fleet November 30, 2015 (by TSgt. Emerson Marcus) - For the second time in its history the 152nd Airlift Wing has upgraded its entire fleet of C-130 Hercules aircraft just as the U.S. Air Force seeks total fleet modernization in the face of nearing federal upgrade deadlines. “It is a significant upgrade and it should help increase mission capability with more reliable equipment,” said Col. Karl Stark, commander of the 152nd. By early 2016, the 152nd — known as the “High Rollers” of the Nevada Air National Guard — will have acquired each of its six C-130 H3 models and two H2.5 models. These models are about a decade newer with nearly 10,000 fewer flight hours than the unit’s previous C-130 H2 models manufactured more than 30 years ago. The incoming models also include new wing boxes. Along with increased longevity as a result of fewer flight hours, the newer models — manufactured in the late-1980s and 1990s — include upgraded engines with digital flight instruments and fuel gauges. The unit’s previous aircraft included analog instruments. The majority of those aircraft are being dispersed to units around the country to make room for the new aircraft in Reno. The upgrade comes just as the U.S. Air Force seeks modernization of its C-130 fleet. The Air National Guard accounts for 40 percent of the Air Force’s total C-130s at locations in states around the nation. But Federal Aviation Administration mandates demand new avionics beginning in 2020. This will leave several units without upgrades necessary to enter air space, including the Nevada Air National Guard’s aircraft. Among upgrades needed are new radios, a digital flight recorder and enhanced air traffic alert system. “They want to modernize the C-130 fleet, but which ones are you going to do it to?” said Senior Master Sgt. Cameron Pieters, a flight engineer with the unit. “Are you going to do it to the oldest ones or the newest ones? For the Nevada Air National Guard to get ahold of the newer ones, that’s definitely a good thing.” Several of the aircraft have already arrived and been adorned with a revised tail flash that updates the font for the “High Rollers” moniker. “It’s exciting for our Airmen to work with more advanced technology,” Stark said. This marks the 152nd’s second C-130 upgrade in its history. The unit transitioned in 1995 from a tactical reconnaissance mission with F-4 aircraft to an airlift support mission with C-130s. The first C-130s that arrived in Reno in 1996 were E models. Some of those aircraft were manufactured in the 1960s. In 2002, the 152nd received H2 models, primarily made in the late-1970s and 1980s. For more than 60 years, the Lockheed Martin-manufactured C-130 has earned the reputation as the workhorse of military aircraft, adept at dirt strip takeoff, troop dropping and supporting humanitarian aid missions. The 152nd Airlift Wing includes about 1,000 Airmen stationed at the Nevada Air National Guard Base in Reno. Hundreds of Nevada Guard Airmen have deployed overseas to Southwest Asia and around the world for tactical air delivery missions and expeditionary combat support with the unit’s C-130s. Additionally, the aircraft is capable of executing domestic missions for cargo transportation, search and rescue and emergency response support during natural disasters. “It’s bittersweet,” Pieters said of having to say goodbye to C-130s he’s worked on for more than a decade. “For me, I started out working on the E models. I got to know and love those airplanes. To watch them go away, it’s kind of sad.” “But we’re going to extend the longevity of our fleet based on airframe hours alone. That’s good for the Nevada Guard and it’s good for the community.” Courtesy of Nevada Joint Force Headquarters Public Affairs Col. Karl Stark, commander of the 152nd AW, applies a new “High Rollers” tail flash on the recently-acquired C-130H3 #93-7311 on October 30, 2015. The 152nd AW is set to acquire all eight of its upgraded C-130s by early next year. It’s the second time in the unit’s history that the fleet has been upgraded since the unit transitioned from F-4 jets to C-130s in 1996.[Courtesy photo]
  15. Yes, severe corrosion is what initiated Patrick's aircraft's early induction to AMARG.
  16. November 30, 2015 (by TSgt. Emerson Marcus) - For the second time in its history the 152nd Airlift Wing has upgraded its entire fleet of C-130 Hercules aircraft just as the U.S. Air Force seeks total fleet modernization in the face of nearing federal upgrade deadlines. “It is a significant upgrade and it should help increase mission capability with more reliable equipment,” said Col. Karl Stark, commander of the 152nd. By early 2016, the 152nd — known as the “High Rollers” of the Nevada Air National Guard — will have acquired each of its six C-130 H3 models and two H2.5 models. These models are about a decade newer with nearly 10,000 fewer flight hours than the unit’s previous C-130 H2 models manufactured more than 30 years ago. The incoming models also include new wing boxes. Along with increased longevity as a result of fewer flight hours, the newer models — manufactured in the late-1980s and 1990s — include upgraded engines with digital flight instruments and fuel gauges. The unit’s previous aircraft included analog instruments. The majority of those aircraft are being dispersed to units around the country to make room for the new aircraft in Reno. The upgrade comes just as the U.S. Air Force seeks modernization of its C-130 fleet. The Air National Guard accounts for 40 percent of the Air Force’s total C-130s at locations in states around the nation. But Federal Aviation Administration mandates demand new avionics beginning in 2020. This will leave several units without upgrades necessary to enter air space, including the Nevada Air National Guard’s aircraft. Among upgrades needed are new radios, a digital flight recorder and enhanced air traffic alert system. “They want to modernize the C-130 fleet, but which ones are you going to do it to?” said Senior Master Sgt. Cameron Pieters, a flight engineer with the unit. “Are you going to do it to the oldest ones or the newest ones? For the Nevada Air National Guard to get ahold of the newer ones, that’s definitely a good thing.” Several of the aircraft have already arrived and been adorned with a revised tail flash that updates the font for the “High Rollers” moniker. “It’s exciting for our Airmen to work with more advanced technology,” Stark said. This marks the 152nd’s second C-130 upgrade in its history. The unit transitioned in 1995 from a tactical reconnaissance mission with F-4 aircraft to an airlift support mission with C-130s. The first C-130s that arrived in Reno in 1996 were E models. Some of those aircraft were manufactured in the 1960s. In 2002, the 152nd received H2 models, primarily made in the late-1970s and 1980s. For more than 60 years, the Lockheed Martin-manufactured C-130 has earned the reputation as the workhorse of military aircraft, adept at dirt strip takeoff, troop dropping and supporting humanitarian aid missions. The 152nd Airlift Wing includes about 1,000 Airmen stationed at the Nevada Air National Guard Base in Reno. Hundreds of Nevada Guard Airmen have deployed overseas to Southwest Asia and around the world for tactical air delivery missions and expeditionary combat support with the unit’s C-130s. Additionally, the aircraft is capable of executing domestic missions for cargo transportation, search and rescue and emergency response support during natural disasters. “It’s bittersweet,” Pieters said of having to say goodbye to C-130s he’s worked on for more than a decade. “For me, I started out working on the E models. I got to know and love those airplanes. To watch them go away, it’s kind of sad.” “But we’re going to extend the longevity of our fleet based on airframe hours alone. That’s good for the Nevada Guard and it’s good for the community.” Courtesy of Nevada Joint Force Headquarters Public Affairs Col. Karl Stark, commander of the 152nd AW, applies a new “High Rollers” tail flash on the recently-acquired C-130H3 #93-7311 on October 30, 2015. The 152nd AW is set to acquire all eight of its upgraded C-130s by early next year. It’s the second time in the unit’s history that the fleet has been upgraded since the unit transitioned from F-4 jets to C-130s in 1996.[Courtesy photo] View full article
  17. I'd like to see the aircraft too...hearing from the crew/seeing some of the video (you know they video for OT&E/DT&E) would be good too. Time will tell regarding the static display but it's already been written off as a total loss. I'm sure there is a fairly large "save" list of parts and components that can be salvaged for use on other J models (given the USAF's limited supply of spare parts). I guess a lot will be determined how it is dispositioned with regard to what parts can cannot be used; people are funny about using parts off crashed aircraft, although this was not crashed, it was involved in an "incident". If they can in fact "save" parts, i.e. engines, doors, flight controls etc, it might prove difficult at this time to fill in the voids of the missing parts. If they cannot "save" parts, that might be a different story and it might go on display a lot earlier than anyone intended on having a AC-130J on display.
  18. For consolidation purposes, I have copied the post in this thread to the "First AC-130J Prototype Declared Loss" news article/forum post here: http://www.c-130hercules.net/forums/topic/8166-c-130-news-first-ac-130j-prototype-declared-loss/#comment-34836 --Casey
  19. Investigators declared the first prototype AC-130J Ghostrider gunship a total loss after the airframe was severely overstressed after departing controlled flight during a test sortie from Eglin AFB, Fla., officials announced. As a result of the incident, "the mishap aircraft exceeded its design limit load to an extent that rendered it unsafe for flight and is considered a total loss to the Air Force," according to Air Force Materiel Command's Accident Investigation Board report, released on Nov. 6. The crew was performing a high-angle, side-slip at Eglin AFB, Fla., during handling tests of the developmental gunship when the aircraft departed controlled flight at 15,000 feet over the Gulf of Mexico, according to the AIB. The AC-130J "tumbled inverted" before test pilots were able to recover controlled flight, entering a vertical dive, on April 21. The aircraft lost 5,000 feet altitude, pulled 3.19 Gs, and oversped the flaps' maximum allowed airspeed by 100 knots before returning to level flight. The AIB determined the pilot's excessive rudder input and failure to quickly recover from uncontrolled flight were the primary cause of the mishap. Problems with the aircraft's warning system, pilot disorientation, confusion from being hit with unsecured equipment, and inadequate technical guidance also contributed to the mishap. The aircraft, serial number 09-5710, also suffered a similar incident in February, and has been grounded since the April mishap. A second AC-130J prototype was delivered to commence operational testing at nearby Hurlburt Field, Fla., in July. Loss of the aircraft is estimated at $115.6 million. View original article at AirForceMagazine.com View full article
  20. 57-0478 inside the Museum of Aviation at Robins...
  21. Any idea what damage occurred to 79-0478?
  22. Bob I seem to recall that 1597, 1598 and one more at Yokota in the early 90s were SOL II and they were all referred to as Super Es too. Remember the third #?
  23. The green material you are referring to is call TPC...temporary protective coating. It's applied at the manufacturer's location and is meant to provide protection to the aluminum skins until such time when the entire aircraft assembly is ready for paint. Paint shop will remove the TPC prior to starting the primer/topcoat application process with a simple alkaline wash. Typically all manufacturer's use/mandate a TPC during the manufacturing process but different manufacturer's use different TPC. Boeing uses a a product with a green tint to it, LMCO uses an orange tinted material etc.
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