Jump to content
Aero Precision provides OEM part support for military aircraft operators across more than 20 aircraft

Dave in WV

Members
  • Content Count

    191
  • Joined

  • Last visited

    Never

Everything posted by Dave in WV

  1. It sounds like a fuel related problem whether it's a low pressure of internal problems in the pump or fuel control.
  2. Two questions on your problem. 1: what model aircraft are you posting about? 2: is it happening on all engines or the first engine starting off of the APU/GTC?
  3. We had big feeling pilot in our unit that thought he was too cool. The pilots were betting a beer on the best landing and he said "I got this one greased". The FE turned on the leading edge anti-icing when he flared. The pilot prolly expected it because he immeadiately compensated and then the leading edge anti-icing came off. IIRC he made a series of landings too.:eek:
  4. I just sucked in my seat cushion thinking about that RZ.
  5. JP-4 and Jet B are wide cut gasoline not kerosine based. IIRC JP-4 weighs 6.7lbs/gallon and JP-5/8 weighs 6.9lbs/gallon. The USAF dip sticks are calibrated for JP-4. If RZ jumps in he will know. I trusted the dip stick more than the digital gauges when we first got them. The digital gauges settled down after a while or maybe we just got used to them.
  6. Skip, you found an unknown problem and then they didn't want to fix it? Bad joo joo. I remember when they did away with the static feather check. Someone somewhere along the line was SUPPOSED to do the check at an unspecified time. Good idea!
  7. I didn't run the A/C with the APU only. By the time the O's came out I was ringing wet so what's a little more heat? Plane first, comfort second. An engineer can control the whines from the APU AND from inside the cockpit.:D
  8. With two engines running, pull the temp control CB. If the airflow increases start looking from there. I had an '88 H2 have the problem and when I pulled the temp control CB the airflow increased. I don't remember the fix. BTW, no I didn'y fly it that way. Those ARNG troops from ST Thomas froze all the way to Virginia though.;)
  9. One of the E models we got at Charlie West had a Bob Hope show sticker on the aft end of the overhead panel. I can't remember which tail # it was but I remember it was Bob Mullens' bird. I tried to talk him into covering the sticker with plexiglass to preserve it but he didn't. I thought it was part of history. That bird is now at Little Rock. I remember his mention of his Herk crews one year during a VN Christmas show. Those C-130 crews are happy go lucky .... happy if it starts and lucky if it goes! John Wilson's (posts here) brother Tom went to the Bob Hope show in Saudi during Desert Shield.
  10. Fowler flaps give you the most lift because they extend back as well as down. They increase in wing area as well as reshaping the wing. C-130's were designed for short field work as well as air drop. I can't say for sure but I'll wager the prop blast blowing over the wings and flaps is kind of like boundry layer control (blowing bleed air over the wings and flaps) like the F-4 Phantoms had to decrease stall speeds. Boundry layer control was only active when the flaps were down. The principle is like having a man made head wind.
  11. IIRC 1787 was the plane I was on when the AC decided to land with a thunder storm over the airfield. The scavenge flow lights and the fuel low pressure warning lights came on for engines 3&4 when we dropped 50' on final. A cross wind gust turned the plane about 40 degrees off heading when we dropped. I didn't think I'd ever get the seat cushion out of my butt. John, I bucked rivets for Dickie and Ron many times cleaning up the scab patches. Roger Young's bird (1824?) had a petrified snake under the cargo comp. floor. When we got the E model that had been shoved off the runway with a bull dozer it had a constant write up for excessive aileron trim required. We had a Lockheed tech rep at the time and he had the crew chief write down the numbers on each wing's placard. One wing was a B model wing that had the pylon tank bracket and plumbing added. It was cleared for a one time flight to depot for an outer wing change.
  12. No, but the day ain't over yet! RZ, you had lots of hours on all the Charlie West birds. How'd you ever get all those hours one weekend a month and two weeks a year?:eek:
  13. Muff, did they ever get the death" smell out of the E models we sent from Charie West? We replaced all of the insulation in the cargo compartments but from July - Sept you could still smell the bodies they hauled out of the field. I was a part timer crew chief from '75-'80 on the E's we had. I cross trained to FE in '81.
  14. New here. 88-1305 was the fastest of the eight (1301-1308) by a few knots. I flew with the 130th from 1982-2002. I started on the E models we got right out of SEA. We got the H models Jackson,MS had next and then the H2's from the factory. The '88' H models were the best for comfort and mission capability. I loved flying them all but 1301-1308 were my favorites.
×
×
  • Create New...