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Aero Precision - Premier C130 Aftermarket Support
Aero Precision - Premier C130 Aftermarket Support
Aero Precision - Premier C130 Aftermarket Support
 
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C-130E_3782_V5_C1 (62-1819)

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$35.00
Custom 17" x 11" color print of C-130E 62-1819 Lockheed c/n 3782.
Take a closer look in our print viewer
Interested in a custom version of this print?  Please drop us a line to discuss. There is typically little to no charge for custom work.
7405th Operations Squadron (The “Berlin for Lunch Bunch”)
Three air routes to West Berlin were established after the end of World War II to give the Western Allies air access to their garrisons in the former Nazi capital. When the Soviet Union imposed its blockade in 1948, these air routes became famous as the vital corridors of the Berlin Airlift, which enabled the British and Americans to supply the beleaguered city.  It is less well known that they were also, for 44 years, how the Allies collected intelligence on the densest concentration of Soviet military forces in the world.
 
Begining in 1946, the "Berlin for Lunch Bunch," as the aircrews called themselves, used three air corridor routes in operations for what was arguably the most important, longest lasting, and successful military reconnaissance
 program of the entire Cold War.
 
From July 1977 to September 1990, the 7405th Operations Squadron was charged with the mission of conducting electronic, communications, and imagery intelligence operations within within the corridor using three Lockheed C-130Es which began arriving at Rhein-Main AB, West Germant in 1975.  They featured a wide variety of sensors and cameras, which provided lucrative intelligence time and time again.  A classic example of this occurred on a mission in 1982 when a C-130 named Creek Fury, in a corridor over a Soviet training area, noted a new SA-8 highly mobile, low-altitude, short-range tactical surface-to-air missile vehicle. The technical ELINT operators collected information on the Land Roll guidance radar, the infrared and photo operators imaged the transporter-erector-launcher, and the visual scanners confirmed that the vehicle was moving about the training area. This was a collection “trifecta” virtually unique at the time.
 
The "Berlin for Lunch Bunch" conducted operations through the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989 and from then on, the 7575th monitored the Soviet exodus from Germany, with a C-130 flying its last collection mission on Sept. 29, 1990.  The unit was  formally inactivated on 23 January 1991, after having flown more than 10,000 missions patrolling the Berlin corridors and siphoning vital intelligence from the very heart of the Soviet presence in Europe.
 

About C-130E_3782_V5_C1 (62-1819)

Custom 17" x 11" color print of C-130E 62-1819 Lockheed c/n 3782.

Take a closer look in our print viewer

Interested in a custom version of this print?  Please drop us a line to discuss. There is typically little to no charge for custom work.

7405th Operations Squadron (The “Berlin for Lunch Bunch”)

Three air routes to West Berlin were established after the end of World War II to give the Western Allies air access to their garrisons in the former Nazi capital. When the Soviet Union imposed its blockade in 1948, these air routes became famous as the vital corridors of the Berlin Airlift, which enabled the British and Americans to supply the beleaguered city.  It is less well known that they were also, for 44 years, how the Allies collected intelligence on the densest concentration of Soviet military forces in the world.
 
Begining in 1946, the "Berlin for Lunch Bunch," as the aircrews called themselves, used three air corridor routes in operations for what was arguably the most important, longest lasting, and successful military reconnaissance
 program of the entire Cold War.
 
From July 1977 to September 1990, the 7405th Operations Squadron was charged with the mission of conducting electronic, communications, and imagery intelligence operations within within the corridor using three Lockheed C-130Es which began arriving at Rhein-Main AB, West Germant in 1975.  They featured a wide variety of sensors and cameras, which provided lucrative intelligence time and time again.  A classic example of this occurred on a mission in 1982 when a C-130 named Creek Fury, in a corridor over a Soviet training area, noted a new SA-8 highly mobile, low-altitude, short-range tactical surface-to-air missile vehicle. The technical ELINT operators collected information on the Land Roll guidance radar, the infrared and photo operators imaged the transporter-erector-launcher, and the visual scanners confirmed that the vehicle was moving about the training area. This was a collection “trifecta” virtually unique at the time.
 
The "Berlin for Lunch Bunch" conducted operations through the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989 and from then on, the 7575th monitored the Soviet exodus from Germany, with a C-130 flying its last collection mission on Sept. 29, 1990.  The unit was  formally inactivated on 23 January 1991, after having flown more than 10,000 missions patrolling the Berlin corridors and siphoning vital intelligence from the very heart of the Soviet presence in Europe.

 

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