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Aero Precision provides OEM part support for military aircraft operators across more than 20 aircraft

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  1. 2 points
    Just found this while messing around on computer. Since I was one of the loadmasters I want to say these are four of the most wonderful guys that I'm proud to call them my "Brothers" Ralph Bemis.
  2. 1 point
    Another of my favorites: Blame the dead horse on the previous owner.
  3. 1 point
    Thanks Sonny. I see in Lars book it has -15 engines and strengthened wings and yep it is still in the South Africa AF. I'll bet that sucker is a real hot rod! The B model was my favorite of all the Herks I worked on.
  4. 1 point
    Hello: That design of the door is because of the space the wheel need to go up and down without get stuck. If you go to the emergency and abnormal procedures section of the flight manual, Main Landing gear Extension After Normal and Emergency System Failure, one note say this: Extend the Aft strut firt. The main landing gear doors are opened by a mechanical connection to the aft strut, and damage to the doors could result if the forward strut is extended firt. If the door don't have that shape the wheel would get stuck.
  5. 1 point
    Hi folks, Sherm here. Anyone out there have copy of the photo of the C-130 which went off the runway at Cape Romanzof back in the '80s? Story goes the 17th guys couldn't fly that day (winds out of limits at the site) and another unit - TDY to Elmendorf - took the trip and were blown off the strip into the gully on the left side. Damage to outboard fuel tank caused a leak and fire. A man with a front-end loader scooped up a load of snow and extinguished the fire. A crane was frozen into place in a makeshift pond created by damming the ditch draining the right side of the runway. Aircraft was pulled out of the creek, back onto the runway and somehow they got it up to the top where it was repaired and flown out, months later, by a 17th crew which included my buddy, Chief Doug Grant. The photo shows the airplane burning before the fire was put out, this photo was hanging in our squadron's Hardstand 13 lounge while I was a member of the 17th TAS (later renamed 517th AS) from 1991-97. Were you on that aircraft when it had the mishap? Where's that photo with the caption "UHAE" The Unique Hazardous Arctic Enviornment, respect it!" or something like that?
  6. 1 point
    Photo taken at Tan Sun Nhut shortly after the 1972 rescue and later printed in the Airlifter Newsletter. Several of those who were rescued are not in the picture because they were evaced to 3rd Field Hospital for injuries.
  7. 1 point
    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/04/19/vietnam-war-heroes-honored-silver-star-45-years-amazing-rescue/ Spc. Leonard “Bruce” Shearer of Indianapolis, Chief Warrant Officer Robert Monette, Capt. Robert Frank, and Spc. John DesLauriers saved five men from a burning plane, WTHR reported. They followed a burning C-130 transport plane that crashed near Saigon in 1972 when they took enemy fire, returned fire of their own, and pulled five men from the burning plane into their Army UH-1H “Huey.” All of the men, including two men who were rescued by a nearby helicopter, survived. “We did these sorts of things in the air cavalry all the time, the difference this time being it was recognized and documented,” Frank told Stars and Stripes. “Heroic things were done every day. Sometimes somebody would see it, other times they wouldn’t.” Shearer made multiple jumps from the helicopter to the burning C-130 below while DesLauriers battled North Vietnamese soldiers. “We were running on fumes,” Monette said. “We were critically low on fuel. But we weren’t going any place until we had the guys on board.” After nearly five decades and several attempts to get medals for the heroes, they were honored with the Silver Star on the 45th anniversary of the rescue. The Silver Star is the third-highest military honor.
  8. 0 points
    hercfixer, Was the tail number of this acft. 62-1838? If so, I was the crew chief from mid 1966 to the end of 1968. During this time the acft. was assigned to the 36 TAS at Langley. Do you have details concerning the accident? If so could you post them here? Seem to recall several years ago there was a thread here talking about this accident, but can't find it. Very disconcerting to find out an acft. that you were responsible for over two years crashed and killed the crew.
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