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  1. Today
  2. Also check LDG torque strut all Strut are same hard or soft and check for Air pressure if soft all strut pressure should be 415 PSI Munir Abbasi
  3. Steering control valve lost spring tension It is, mal function of the component, install gauge check pressure on neutral position at point mention on TO (40 psi )as as per TO regards Munir abbasi
  4. The air crew were detailed to carr out a regular cargo msn on route Bunia to goma in C-130B ac ser no 0962.During the takeoff roll,after 60 knots, capt shifted his hand to flt con leaving the nose wh steering as the normal procedure. but at about 80 knots the ac suddenly swung to the left,the capt immediate decided to abort the msn and ac control by applying differential braking with the help of the co-pltand nose wh steering input. Finaly we suspected that nose steering control valve malfunction during ac speed 80 knots. What might be the reason can anyone inform. Thanks in advance.
  5. Last week
  6. Teaching the Commando new tricks By Staff Sgt. Brandon Esau, AFSOC Public Affairs / Published September 14, 2021 HURLBURT FIELD, Fla. -- The C-130J is an incredibly versatile aircraft, and since it’s creation, it’s landed on rough fields, in arctic locations and even an aircraft carrier Yet, it cannot land on water, which covers about 71% of the planet. As national strategic objectives shift focus to littoral regions, Air Force Special Operations Command is advancing new approaches to expand the multi-mission platform's runway independence and expeditionary capacity. In partnership with the Air Force Research Lab's Strategic Development Planning and Experimentation (AFRL-SDPE) directorate, AFSOC is developing an MC-130J Commando II Amphibious Capability (MAC) to improve the platform's support of seaborne special operations. "The development of the MAC capability is the culmination of multiple lines of effort," said Lt Col Josh Trantham, AFSOC Science, Systems, Technology, & Innovation (SST&I) Deputy Division Chief. "This capability allows the Air Force to increase placement and access for infiltration, exfiltration, and personnel recovery, as well as providing enhanced logistical capabilities for future competition and conflict." The development of a removable amphibious float modification for an MC-130J would enable "runway independent" operations, which, according to Trantham, would extend the global reach and survivability of the aircraft and Air Commandos. "Seaborne operations offer nearly unlimited water landing zones providing significant flexibility for the Joint Force," Trantham said. Utilizing the MAC capability may provide unlimited operational access to waterways to distribute forces if land assets are compromised. "MAC is vital to future success because it will allow for the dispersal of assets within a Joint Operations Area," said Maj Kristen Cepak, AFSOC Technology Transition Branch Chief. "This diaspora complicates targeting of the aircraft by our adversaries and limits aircraft vulnerability at fixed locations." A task force of industry partners are closely collaborating with AFSOC and AFRL-SDPE to bring the vision to life. A five-phase rapid prototyping schedule will lead to an operational capability demonstration in only 17 months while de-risking the concept for a future potential MAC program of record that could field MAC for MC-130Js but also potentially field a similar amphibious capability for other C-130 variants with only minor variations. AFSOC and private sector counterparts are currently testing MAC prototypes through digital design, virtual reality modeling (VR), and computer-aided designs (CAD) in a virtual setting known as the Digital Proving Ground (DPG), paving the way for digital simulation, testing, and the use of advanced manufacturing for rapid prototyping and physical prototype testing. According to Trantham and Cepak, the DPG can deliver mission review, aircraft system analysis, design ideation, engineering risk-reduction, virtual reality, concept imagery, feasibility studies, and other deliverables. "Being able to experiment with existing technology to evaluate design tradeoffs and test a new system before ever bending metal is a game-changer," Cepak said. "AFSOC is evolving and experimenting in a smart way to reduce technical risk and deliver capability to the field more rapidly and efficiently than before." According to Trantham, while the MAC project demonstrates rapid capability development for AFSOC, the Air Force and the Total Force will also benefit. "We believe MAC will be able to be used by our sister services, allies, and partners on various C-130 platforms," he said. "Further, expanding the operational use of an amphibious aircraft alongside other innovative tools will provide even more complex dilemmas in future battlespaces for our strategic competitors." View Original Article: Teaching the Commando new tricks > Air Force Special Operations Command > Article Display (af.mil) View full article
  7. Teaching the Commando new tricks By Staff Sgt. Brandon Esau, AFSOC Public Affairs / Published September 14, 2021 HURLBURT FIELD, Fla. -- The C-130J is an incredibly versatile aircraft, and since it’s creation, it’s landed on rough fields, in arctic locations and even an aircraft carrier Yet, it cannot land on water, which covers about 71% of the planet. As national strategic objectives shift focus to littoral regions, Air Force Special Operations Command is advancing new approaches to expand the multi-mission platform's runway independence and expeditionary capacity. In partnership with the Air Force Research Lab's Strategic Development Planning and Experimentation (AFRL-SDPE) directorate, AFSOC is developing an MC-130J Commando II Amphibious Capability (MAC) to improve the platform's support of seaborne special operations. "The development of the MAC capability is the culmination of multiple lines of effort," said Lt Col Josh Trantham, AFSOC Science, Systems, Technology, & Innovation (SST&I) Deputy Division Chief. "This capability allows the Air Force to increase placement and access for infiltration, exfiltration, and personnel recovery, as well as providing enhanced logistical capabilities for future competition and conflict." The development of a removable amphibious float modification for an MC-130J would enable "runway independent" operations, which, according to Trantham, would extend the global reach and survivability of the aircraft and Air Commandos. "Seaborne operations offer nearly unlimited water landing zones providing significant flexibility for the Joint Force," Trantham said. Utilizing the MAC capability may provide unlimited operational access to waterways to distribute forces if land assets are compromised. "MAC is vital to future success because it will allow for the dispersal of assets within a Joint Operations Area," said Maj Kristen Cepak, AFSOC Technology Transition Branch Chief. "This diaspora complicates targeting of the aircraft by our adversaries and limits aircraft vulnerability at fixed locations." A task force of industry partners are closely collaborating with AFSOC and AFRL-SDPE to bring the vision to life. A five-phase rapid prototyping schedule will lead to an operational capability demonstration in only 17 months while de-risking the concept for a future potential MAC program of record that could field MAC for MC-130Js but also potentially field a similar amphibious capability for other C-130 variants with only minor variations. AFSOC and private sector counterparts are currently testing MAC prototypes through digital design, virtual reality modeling (VR), and computer-aided designs (CAD) in a virtual setting known as the Digital Proving Ground (DPG), paving the way for digital simulation, testing, and the use of advanced manufacturing for rapid prototyping and physical prototype testing. According to Trantham and Cepak, the DPG can deliver mission review, aircraft system analysis, design ideation, engineering risk-reduction, virtual reality, concept imagery, feasibility studies, and other deliverables. "Being able to experiment with existing technology to evaluate design tradeoffs and test a new system before ever bending metal is a game-changer," Cepak said. "AFSOC is evolving and experimenting in a smart way to reduce technical risk and deliver capability to the field more rapidly and efficiently than before." According to Trantham, while the MAC project demonstrates rapid capability development for AFSOC, the Air Force and the Total Force will also benefit. "We believe MAC will be able to be used by our sister services, allies, and partners on various C-130 platforms," he said. "Further, expanding the operational use of an amphibious aircraft alongside other innovative tools will provide even more complex dilemmas in future battlespaces for our strategic competitors." View Original Article: Teaching the Commando new tricks > Air Force Special Operations Command > Article Display (af.mil)
  8. Lockheed Martin's C-130J Super Hercules aircraft is not just the workhorse for the military but also a super achiever. In its career that has spanned over two decades, this aircraft has landed in the Arctic, on the highest airstrip, and even an aircraft carrier carrying out medevac, troop, and cargo transport. The US Air Force now plans to make it a seaplane as well, thereby making it possible for this mighty aircraft to land anywhere across the globe. To ensure that the new version of the aircraft is not just limited to water bodies, the Air Force Special Operations Command is partnering with the Air Force Research Lab's Strategic Development Planning and Experimentation (AFRL-SDPE) to develop amphibious capability. Dubbed as MAC (MC-130J Commando II Amphibious Capability) will "increase placement and access for infiltration, exfiltration, and personnel recovery, as well as providing enhanced logistical capabilities for future competition and conflict," Lt Col Josh Trantham at AFSOC said in the press release. Colossal Antarctic Cruiser Vanished in the Snow. Here's What Happened to It The AFSOC is currently working with a task force of industrial partners and plans to undertake a five-phase rapid prototyping schedule to demonstrate operational capability in just 17 months. This could also potentially be used on other C130s with minor modifications, the press release said. Aiding the accelerated development plans is the Digital Proving Ground (DPG), a virtual setting that uses digital design, virtual reality (VR) modeling, and computer-aided design for simulation and testing of prototypes. The DPG also allows the use of advanced manufacturing for rapid prototyping, further accelerating the testing phase of the prototypes. The AFSOC released some prototype images that have been tested on the DPG. According to the press release, the DPG has multiple capabilities such as "mission review, aircraft system analysis, design ideation, engineering risk-reduction, virtual reality, concept imagery" and also allows for feasibility studies. Praising the platform, Maj Kristen Cepak, Chief of Technology Transition Branch at AFSOC said, "Being able to experiment with existing technology to evaluate design tradeoffs and test a new system before ever bending metal is a game-changer." A rendering of an amphibious modification to an MC-130J Commando II is shown here that is used in the Digital Proving Grounds. Air Force Special Operations Command and private sector counterparts are currently developing a Removable Amphibious Float Modification (RAFM) for the MC-130J, allowing the aircraft to take off and land in bodies of water. (Courtesy photo) Source: US Air Force Once developed, MAC is expected to be used by a wide variety of services across the C130 platform, further expanding the versatility of this aircraft and reducing the dependence on dedicated infrastructure such as airstrips that are potential targets during a conflict. View original article: The US Air Force's MC-130 Seaplane is Finally in the Works (interestingengineering.com) View full article
  9. Lockheed Martin's C-130J Super Hercules aircraft is not just the workhorse for the military but also a super achiever. In its career that has spanned over two decades, this aircraft has landed in the Arctic, on the highest airstrip, and even an aircraft carrier carrying out medevac, troop, and cargo transport. The US Air Force now plans to make it a seaplane as well, thereby making it possible for this mighty aircraft to land anywhere across the globe. To ensure that the new version of the aircraft is not just limited to water bodies, the Air Force Special Operations Command is partnering with the Air Force Research Lab's Strategic Development Planning and Experimentation (AFRL-SDPE) to develop amphibious capability. Dubbed as MAC (MC-130J Commando II Amphibious Capability) will "increase placement and access for infiltration, exfiltration, and personnel recovery, as well as providing enhanced logistical capabilities for future competition and conflict," Lt Col Josh Trantham at AFSOC said in the press release. Colossal Antarctic Cruiser Vanished in the Snow. Here's What Happened to It The AFSOC is currently working with a task force of industrial partners and plans to undertake a five-phase rapid prototyping schedule to demonstrate operational capability in just 17 months. This could also potentially be used on other C130s with minor modifications, the press release said. Aiding the accelerated development plans is the Digital Proving Ground (DPG), a virtual setting that uses digital design, virtual reality (VR) modeling, and computer-aided design for simulation and testing of prototypes. The DPG also allows the use of advanced manufacturing for rapid prototyping, further accelerating the testing phase of the prototypes. The AFSOC released some prototype images that have been tested on the DPG. According to the press release, the DPG has multiple capabilities such as "mission review, aircraft system analysis, design ideation, engineering risk-reduction, virtual reality, concept imagery" and also allows for feasibility studies. Praising the platform, Maj Kristen Cepak, Chief of Technology Transition Branch at AFSOC said, "Being able to experiment with existing technology to evaluate design tradeoffs and test a new system before ever bending metal is a game-changer." A rendering of an amphibious modification to an MC-130J Commando II is shown here that is used in the Digital Proving Grounds. Air Force Special Operations Command and private sector counterparts are currently developing a Removable Amphibious Float Modification (RAFM) for the MC-130J, allowing the aircraft to take off and land in bodies of water. (Courtesy photo) Source: US Air Force Once developed, MAC is expected to be used by a wide variety of services across the C130 platform, further expanding the versatility of this aircraft and reducing the dependence on dedicated infrastructure such as airstrips that are potential targets during a conflict. View original article: The US Air Force's MC-130 Seaplane is Finally in the Works (interestingengineering.com)
  10. Earlier
  11. The United States military made history yesterday when it landed a C-130 aircraft on Highway 287 north of Rawlins during a joint training exercise. Moments after sunrise, the cargo plane burst through storm clouds to the east of the roadway at about 240 miles per hour. 500 feet off each wingtip was an A10. Known also as “flying guns,” A10’s are the Air Force’s primary low-altitude close support aircraft. Until yesterday, the Air Force had never landed a C130 on an American highway, although two A10’s landed on a Michigan highway earlier this month. Prior to that, such a feat had only been done in Estonia during the Cold War. With a wingspan of more than 132 feet, the four-engine C130 is over 97 feet long and has a 42,000 pound payload. It’s manned by a five-person crew including two pilots, a navigator, flight engineer and loadmaster. The US military has used the C130 since 1956 as a troop, medevac and cargo transport aircraft. It is designed for landings and takeoffs on short, unprepared airstrips in combat zones. Despite gusty winds, a wet road surface, heavy cloud cover and a speed of 120 miles per hour, the pilots set the C130 down perfectly on the centerline of the highway -- making history. View Original Article: https://bigfoot99.com/bigfoot99-news/air-force-pilots-test-landing-skills-on-highway-287-during-military-exercise/?fbclid=IwAR0Y2NcaFh-9Udl1PAFRRYGFkFA2mOeZ6xrmGdc0VFsO5zsyFtf0f69DV3M
  12. The United States military made history yesterday when it landed a C-130 aircraft on Highway 287 north of Rawlins during a joint training exercise. Moments after sunrise, the cargo plane burst through storm clouds to the east of the roadway at about 240 miles per hour. 500 feet off each wingtip was an A10. Known also as “flying guns,” A10’s are the Air Force’s primary low-altitude close support aircraft. Until yesterday, the Air Force had never landed a C130 on an American highway, although two A10’s landed on a Michigan highway earlier this month. Prior to that, such a feat had only been done in Estonia during the Cold War. With a wingspan of more than 132 feet, the four-engine C130 is over 97 feet long and has a 42,000 pound payload. It’s manned by a five-person crew including two pilots, a navigator, flight engineer and loadmaster. The US military has used the C130 since 1956 as a troop, medevac and cargo transport aircraft. It is designed for landings and takeoffs on short, unprepared airstrips in combat zones. Despite gusty winds, a wet road surface, heavy cloud cover and a speed of 120 miles per hour, the pilots set the C130 down perfectly on the centerline of the highway -- making history. View Original Article: https://bigfoot99.com/bigfoot99-news/air-force-pilots-test-landing-skills-on-highway-287-during-military-exercise/?fbclid=IwAR0Y2NcaFh-9Udl1PAFRRYGFkFA2mOeZ6xrmGdc0VFsO5zsyFtf0f69DV3M View full article
  13. lI would have been more impressed if the hiway was two lane. 😃 Considering how long the Herk has been doing tactical airlift, especially in Viet Nam, on unimproved strips barely long enough for C-7s, surprised this operation had never been done before. Further, landing on hiway has long been done by numerous other air forces including the RAF who've landed a C-130J on a beach. Thinking this operation was a piece of cake for one of the many highly qualified Guard aircrews.
  14. The United States military made history yesterday when it landed a C-130 aircraft on Highway 287 north of Rawlins during a joint training exercise. Moments after sunrise, the cargo plane burst through storm clouds to the east of the roadway at about 240 miles per hour. 500 feet off each wingtip was an A10. Known also as “flying guns,” A10’s are the Air Force’s primary low-altitude close support aircraft. Until yesterday, the Air Force had never landed a C130 on an American highway, although two A10’s landed on a Michigan highway earlier this month. Prior to that, such a feat had only been done in Estonia during the Cold War. With a wingspan of more than 132 feet, the four-engine C130 is over 97 feet long and has a 42,000 pound payload. It’s manned by a five-person crew including two pilots, a navigator, flight engineer and loadmaster. The US military has used the C130 since 1956 as a troop, medevac and cargo transport aircraft. It is designed for landings and takeoffs on short, unprepared airstrips in combat zones. Despite gusty winds, a wet road surface, heavy cloud cover and a speed of 120 miles per hour, the pilots set the C130 down perfectly on the centerline of the highway -- making history. View Original Article: https://bigfoot99.com/bigfoot99-news/air-force-pilots-test-landing-skills-on-highway-287-during-military-exercise/?fbclid=IwAR0Y2NcaFh-9Udl1PAFRRYGFkFA2mOeZ6xrmGdc0VFsO5zsyFtf0f69DV3M
  15. LITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE, Ark. -- Aircraft maintenance units at Little Rock Air Force Base recently turned toward implementing Torque, a software suite of tools and applications, as part of an effort to streamline processes and efficiency to improve productivity across the units and installation. In an effort to align with Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Charles. Q. Brown Jr.’s Action Order Delta: Design Implementation, Torque was first introduced within one of 19th AMXS’s smaller sections, allowing users to see firsthand how the software could potentially replace their dated databases. Designed and developed by Kessel Run, the U.S. Air Force’s product development and programming team, the 19th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron began beta testing the software in January 2021. “We used our smallest shop as a testbed to assess what the capabilities were and how we could leverage it to our advantage,” said Master Sgt. Jose Piedra, 19th AMXS section chief. “Once we gained this understanding, we started onboarding all of our shops week by week.” Piedra said the primary advantage of the Torque platform is the ability to pull and transfer data between various applications and integrate that information into a consolidated location, which is capable of updating in real-time due to the software’s modern technology. Specific to LRAFB-based maintenance units, the upside to the new software is its enhanced personnel management function, which improved the ability to track appointments, manning, and qualifications of all maintainers within one system. “It allows for synchronization of our entire team,” said Piedra. “Torque has many advantages including: allowing multiple people to login at the same time; access to full-time programmers that can add features; personal cellular device accessibility; and the data is stored on the cloud and is not dependent on government networks.” Once the capabilities were clear and the 19th AMXS knew what they had, it was shared with mission partners across LRAFB. “We linked up with 19th AMXS to see what the product looked like and sat in on some Zoom meetings with Kessel Run,” said Master Sgt. Nathan Horrocks, 314th AMXS section chief. “This familiarized us with the program and let us know what to expect. We have now been using the system for several months.” Despite the advantages Torque provides TLR aircraft maintenance, Horrocks said funding beyond FY21 is not guaranteed and could lead to reverting back to their old systems. “If Torque was no longer available we would have a couple of options,” Horrocks said. “We could pursue another application, which would cost more money, or revert back to our old systems, which took more time and was much less efficient.” The advantages to using Torque is why Piedra and Horrocks want to see it stick around, because without it, they said mission efficiency suffers. “Torque lowers the possibility of scheduling conflicts or overcommitting our people,” Piedra said. “With our old programs we would come into scheduling conflicts. Moreover, on some occasions the schedule wasn’t updated and we wouldn’t have the appropriate coverage. Torque allows us to all be on the same page and optimize mission effectiveness.” View Original Article: Torque synchronizes TLR C-130J aircraft maintenance > Little Rock Air Force Base > Article Display
  16. LITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE, Ark. -- Aircraft maintenance units at Little Rock Air Force Base recently turned toward implementing Torque, a software suite of tools and applications, as part of an effort to streamline processes and efficiency to improve productivity across the units and installation. In an effort to align with Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Charles. Q. Brown Jr.’s Action Order Delta: Design Implementation, Torque was first introduced within one of 19th AMXS’s smaller sections, allowing users to see firsthand how the software could potentially replace their dated databases. Designed and developed by Kessel Run, the U.S. Air Force’s product development and programming team, the 19th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron began beta testing the software in January 2021. “We used our smallest shop as a testbed to assess what the capabilities were and how we could leverage it to our advantage,” said Master Sgt. Jose Piedra, 19th AMXS section chief. “Once we gained this understanding, we started onboarding all of our shops week by week.” Piedra said the primary advantage of the Torque platform is the ability to pull and transfer data between various applications and integrate that information into a consolidated location, which is capable of updating in real-time due to the software’s modern technology. Specific to LRAFB-based maintenance units, the upside to the new software is its enhanced personnel management function, which improved the ability to track appointments, manning, and qualifications of all maintainers within one system. “It allows for synchronization of our entire team,” said Piedra. “Torque has many advantages including: allowing multiple people to login at the same time; access to full-time programmers that can add features; personal cellular device accessibility; and the data is stored on the cloud and is not dependent on government networks.” Once the capabilities were clear and the 19th AMXS knew what they had, it was shared with mission partners across LRAFB. “We linked up with 19th AMXS to see what the product looked like and sat in on some Zoom meetings with Kessel Run,” said Master Sgt. Nathan Horrocks, 314th AMXS section chief. “This familiarized us with the program and let us know what to expect. We have now been using the system for several months.” Despite the advantages Torque provides TLR aircraft maintenance, Horrocks said funding beyond FY21 is not guaranteed and could lead to reverting back to their old systems. “If Torque was no longer available we would have a couple of options,” Horrocks said. “We could pursue another application, which would cost more money, or revert back to our old systems, which took more time and was much less efficient.” The advantages to using Torque is why Piedra and Horrocks want to see it stick around, because without it, they said mission efficiency suffers. “Torque lowers the possibility of scheduling conflicts or overcommitting our people,” Piedra said. “With our old programs we would come into scheduling conflicts. Moreover, on some occasions the schedule wasn’t updated and we wouldn’t have the appropriate coverage. Torque allows us to all be on the same page and optimize mission effectiveness.” View Original Article: Torque synchronizes TLR C-130J aircraft maintenance > Little Rock Air Force Base > Article Display View full article
  17. An elderly couple, Ray and Bessie, are "snowbirds" in Texas. Ray always wanted a pair of authentic cowboy boots. Seeing some on sale one day, he buys them, wears them home, walking proudly. He walks into the house and says to his wife: "Notice anything different about me?" Bessie looks him over and says, "Nope." Frustrated, Ray storms off into the bathroom; undresses and walks back into the room completely naked except for the boots. Again, he asks, a little louder this time, "Notice anything DIFFERENT NOW?" Bessie looks up and says, "Ray, what's different? It's hanging down today, it was hanging down yesterday, it'll be hanging down again tomorrow." Furious, Ray yells, "AND DO YOU KNOW WHY IT'S HANGING DOWN, BESSIE? IT'S HANGING DOWN BECAUSE IT'S LOOKING AT MY NEW BOOTS!!!!!" To which Bessie replies, "Shoulda bought a hat, Ray. Shoulda bought a hat."
  18. Teaching the Commando new tricks By Staff Sgt. Brandon Esau, AFSOC Public Affairs / Published September 14, 2021 HURLBURT FIELD, Fla. -- The C-130J is an incredibly versatile aircraft, and since it’s creation, it’s landed on rough fields, in arctic locations and even an aircraft carrier Yet, it cannot land on water, which covers about 71% of the planet. As national strategic objectives shift focus to littoral regions, Air Force Special Operations Command is advancing new approaches to expand the multi-mission platform's runway independence and expeditionary capacity. In partnership with the Air Force Research Lab's Strategic Development Planning and Experimentation (AFRL-SDPE) directorate, AFSOC is developing an MC-130J Commando II Amphibious Capability (MAC) to improve the platform's support of seaborne special operations. "The development of the MAC capability is the culmination of multiple lines of effort," said Lt Col Josh Trantham, AFSOC Science, Systems, Technology, & Innovation (SST&I) Deputy Division Chief. "This capability allows the Air Force to increase placement and access for infiltration, exfiltration, and personnel recovery, as well as providing enhanced logistical capabilities for future competition and conflict." The development of a removable amphibious float modification for an MC-130J would enable "runway independent" operations, which, according to Trantham, would extend the global reach and survivability of the aircraft and Air Commandos. "Seaborne operations offer nearly unlimited water landing zones providing significant flexibility for the Joint Force," Trantham said. Utilizing the MAC capability may provide unlimited operational access to waterways to distribute forces if land assets are compromised. "MAC is vital to future success because it will allow for the dispersal of assets within a Joint Operations Area," said Maj Kristen Cepak, AFSOC Technology Transition Branch Chief. "This diaspora complicates targeting of the aircraft by our adversaries and limits aircraft vulnerability at fixed locations." A task force of industry partners are closely collaborating with AFSOC and AFRL-SDPE to bring the vision to life. A five-phase rapid prototyping schedule will lead to an operational capability demonstration in only 17 months while de-risking the concept for a future potential MAC program of record that could field MAC for MC-130Js but also potentially field a similar amphibious capability for other C-130 variants with only minor variations. AFSOC and private sector counterparts are currently testing MAC prototypes through digital design, virtual reality modeling (VR), and computer-aided designs (CAD) in a virtual setting known as the Digital Proving Ground (DPG), paving the way for digital simulation, testing, and the use of advanced manufacturing for rapid prototyping and physical prototype testing. According to Trantham and Cepak, the DPG can deliver mission review, aircraft system analysis, design ideation, engineering risk-reduction, virtual reality, concept imagery, feasibility studies, and other deliverables. "Being able to experiment with existing technology to evaluate design tradeoffs and test a new system before ever bending metal is a game-changer," Cepak said. "AFSOC is evolving and experimenting in a smart way to reduce technical risk and deliver capability to the field more rapidly and efficiently than before." According to Trantham, while the MAC project demonstrates rapid capability development for AFSOC, the Air Force and the Total Force will also benefit. "We believe MAC will be able to be used by our sister services, allies, and partners on various C-130 platforms," he said. "Further, expanding the operational use of an amphibious aircraft alongside other innovative tools will provide even more complex dilemmas in future battlespaces for our strategic competitors." View Original Article: Teaching the Commando new tricks > Air Force Special Operations Command > Article Display (af.mil)
  19. PETERSON SPACE FORCE BASE, Colo. (AFNS) -- The 302nd Airlift Wing has three C-130 Hercules aircraft flying sorties out of McClellan Air Tanker Base this year in Sacramento County, California, performing an aerial firefighting mission unique within the Air Force Reserve. Since first being activated July 20, the 302 AW has been working together with other military aircraft from Nevada Air National Guard’s 152nd AW, Wyoming ANG’s 153rd AW, and California ANG’s 146th AW to drop millions of gallons of fire retardant in support of fire suppression efforts in California. On Aug. 25, all eight C-130 aerial firefighting aircraft were activated for the first time since 2012. The aircraft are equipped with a U.S. Forest Service Modular Airborne Firefighting System unit loaded in the cargo bay without requiring any structural modifications to the airframe, enabling crews to drop up to 3,000 gallons of fire retardant in less than 5 seconds over a quarter mile stretch of land. As of Sept. 12, the combined effort of these units has resulted in the delivery of 23 million pounds of fire retardant through 925 drops over a variety of fires since ANG assistance was first requested June 26. This has been the second highest producing season in the 48-year history of MAFFS. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or CAL FIRE, the host unit at McClellan ATB, also broke personal records this year by mixing and delivering 6.5 million gallons of fire retardant supporting military and civilian aerial firefighting aircraft alike. “Everything we do is to support the work accomplished by the crews on the ground,” said Lt. Col. Brad Ross, 302nd Operations Group commander. “With a few rare exceptions, the retardant drops cannot put out a fire on their own, but slow the fire and reinforce lines laid by the firefighters providing a better opportunity to contain the fire.” Ross said firefighting efforts have been focused on the Dixie, Caldor, Antelope, River Complex, Monument, French and several other smaller fires. Each fire presents its own unique challenge, whether it’s variations in terrain, problems with visibility, or ensuring separation from other aircraft on larger fires. Even though there are well-established procedures preparing crews for these challenges, that doesn’t mean it’s easy. “Flying MAFFS is the most tactical, challenging flying that we do outside of deployed combat zones,” said Master Sgt. Michael Davenport, 731st Airlift Squadron loadmaster. “Low-level flying in the mountains over ridges and through valleys for retardant drops 150-200 feet above ground level while considering weather and fire conditions requires the best, most experienced aircrews a squadron has to offer.” Davenport said the most important part of MAFFS is maintaining situational awareness. Each crew member needs to be aware of everything happening around them while flying to and from fires. Everyone is listening to radio calls, watching airspeeds and altitudes, monitoring aircraft and MAFFS systems while communicating with one another every step of the way. Situational awareness and warding off tunnel vision is vital for flying in general, but significantly more important when flying over wildfires. The number of drops on any given day depends on a wide variety of factors. During calm days with no breeze it’s possible for smoke to linger and greatly impact visibility during flight, limiting the ability of crews to drop. They also don’t fly before sunrise or after sunset because it adds another layer of risk to an already challenging mission. But, when conditions are right, it’s possible for one crew to perform 15 drops in a single day. Everybody needs to be ready to go within minutes in case a launch order is called for, and crews are often on standby until sunset. Each drop involves a coordinated effort between aircrew, maintenance teams, CAL FIRE ground crew and the U.S. Forest Service to ensure the process goes as smoothly and safely as possible, from the moment the aircraft starts to the moment the fire retardant is discharged. “All of us take a tremendous amount of pride from being a part of flying the MAFFS mission,” Davenport said. “Every year we see firsthand what kind of destruction wildfires can cause, so it’s an honor to be part of a larger effort to stop them and keep people safe.” At one point during the season, all eight military aircraft were airborne at the same time working together to fight the Dixie fire on its eastern and western zones. Ross said it can be challenging maneuvering that many aircraft at once during the loading pits when they come down to refill their MAFFS tanks. “The time commitments from our maintenance and operations personnel on scene are significant,” Ross said. “Our stated mission is to supply two planes and crews, but now we’re providing three and doing so very successfully. Our C-130s have retained a remarkable mission capable rate due to the hard work and dedication from the 302nd Maintenance Group, and getting large amounts of people and equipment out to support the operation doesn’t come together without the help of nearly every unit in the 302nd Mission Support Group.” Ross said the amount of drops happening wouldn't be possible without the extensive efforts of the 302nd MXG team committed to keeping the aircraft flying. Of the three aircraft the 302nd AW has supplied to the firefighting efforts, only one has been down so far due to maintenance issues which were resolved quickly. Another aircraft was down for a major inspection that takes a week during normal operations, but the team finished in just four days. Maintainers have been providing a 100% aircraft commitment rate for two months, which is unheard of according to Ross. Lt. Col. Richard Pantusa, 302nd AW aerial firefighting chief, said crews flying C-130s work alongside other aircraft such as federally-activated large and very large air tankers, Air Force RC-26 infrared imaging platforms, helicopters, aerial supervision and water scooper aircraft. They also work together with California State S-2 trackers and OV-10 broncos, helicopters and various other manned and unmanned planes. Aircraft from as far as Australia have been joining the fire suppression efforts this year. “It required careful coordination between wing leadership, our partner wings in the ANG, and the National Interagency Fire Center, to ensure that we were able to support the requirements of the firefighting effort this year,” Pantusa said. “Our MAFFS team never ceases to amaze me, with many of our operations, maintenance, and logistics folks jumping-in with overwhelming motivation to do this mission well.” Only experienced aircrew are eligible to become qualified to perform the dangerous aerial firefighting mission, said Pantusa. They’re selected from within the 731st AS aircrews and require several years of flying experience in a variety of deployed and domestic operations prior to meeting the initial MAFFS qualification threshold. Once they meet the requirement, they’re trained during an annual training event hosted by the U.S. Forest Service. All MAFFS-certified crews attend this training every year. The 302nd AW has 10 MAFFS-certified crews prepared to support the mission with three currently flying, swapped out weekly. In the 1970s, Congress established the MAFFS Program to aid the United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service. Typically, when all other civilian air tankers are activated but further assistance is needed, the U.S. Forest Service, through the National Interagency Fire Center, can request the aid of the U.S. Air Force's MAFFS flying units. MAFFS is a mission that highlights interagency cooperation. The 302nd AW works in concert with NIFC and the U.S. Forest Service. NIFC serves as a focal point for coordinating the national mobilization of resources for wildland fire. When it is determined MAFFS will be utilized, NIFC through U.S. Northern Command requests Air Force resources. Pantusa said conditions for wildfires in 2021 are at elevated levels over large portions of the Western United States, and all types of resources have been activated to support the national effort. The military aerial firefighting efforts are expected to continue through to the end of October. View original article: Reserve C-130 aerial firefighting teams fly during second busiest wildfire season > U.S. Air Force > Article Display (af.mil)
  20. PETERSON SPACE FORCE BASE, Colo. (AFNS) -- The 302nd Airlift Wing has three C-130 Hercules aircraft flying sorties out of McClellan Air Tanker Base this year in Sacramento County, California, performing an aerial firefighting mission unique within the Air Force Reserve. Since first being activated July 20, the 302 AW has been working together with other military aircraft from Nevada Air National Guard’s 152nd AW, Wyoming ANG’s 153rd AW, and California ANG’s 146th AW to drop millions of gallons of fire retardant in support of fire suppression efforts in California. On Aug. 25, all eight C-130 aerial firefighting aircraft were activated for the first time since 2012. The aircraft are equipped with a U.S. Forest Service Modular Airborne Firefighting System unit loaded in the cargo bay without requiring any structural modifications to the airframe, enabling crews to drop up to 3,000 gallons of fire retardant in less than 5 seconds over a quarter mile stretch of land. As of Sept. 12, the combined effort of these units has resulted in the delivery of 23 million pounds of fire retardant through 925 drops over a variety of fires since ANG assistance was first requested June 26. This has been the second highest producing season in the 48-year history of MAFFS. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or CAL FIRE, the host unit at McClellan ATB, also broke personal records this year by mixing and delivering 6.5 million gallons of fire retardant supporting military and civilian aerial firefighting aircraft alike. “Everything we do is to support the work accomplished by the crews on the ground,” said Lt. Col. Brad Ross, 302nd Operations Group commander. “With a few rare exceptions, the retardant drops cannot put out a fire on their own, but slow the fire and reinforce lines laid by the firefighters providing a better opportunity to contain the fire.” Ross said firefighting efforts have been focused on the Dixie, Caldor, Antelope, River Complex, Monument, French and several other smaller fires. Each fire presents its own unique challenge, whether it’s variations in terrain, problems with visibility, or ensuring separation from other aircraft on larger fires. Even though there are well-established procedures preparing crews for these challenges, that doesn’t mean it’s easy. “Flying MAFFS is the most tactical, challenging flying that we do outside of deployed combat zones,” said Master Sgt. Michael Davenport, 731st Airlift Squadron loadmaster. “Low-level flying in the mountains over ridges and through valleys for retardant drops 150-200 feet above ground level while considering weather and fire conditions requires the best, most experienced aircrews a squadron has to offer.” Davenport said the most important part of MAFFS is maintaining situational awareness. Each crew member needs to be aware of everything happening around them while flying to and from fires. Everyone is listening to radio calls, watching airspeeds and altitudes, monitoring aircraft and MAFFS systems while communicating with one another every step of the way. Situational awareness and warding off tunnel vision is vital for flying in general, but significantly more important when flying over wildfires. The number of drops on any given day depends on a wide variety of factors. During calm days with no breeze it’s possible for smoke to linger and greatly impact visibility during flight, limiting the ability of crews to drop. They also don’t fly before sunrise or after sunset because it adds another layer of risk to an already challenging mission. But, when conditions are right, it’s possible for one crew to perform 15 drops in a single day. Everybody needs to be ready to go within minutes in case a launch order is called for, and crews are often on standby until sunset. Each drop involves a coordinated effort between aircrew, maintenance teams, CAL FIRE ground crew and the U.S. Forest Service to ensure the process goes as smoothly and safely as possible, from the moment the aircraft starts to the moment the fire retardant is discharged. “All of us take a tremendous amount of pride from being a part of flying the MAFFS mission,” Davenport said. “Every year we see firsthand what kind of destruction wildfires can cause, so it’s an honor to be part of a larger effort to stop them and keep people safe.” At one point during the season, all eight military aircraft were airborne at the same time working together to fight the Dixie fire on its eastern and western zones. Ross said it can be challenging maneuvering that many aircraft at once during the loading pits when they come down to refill their MAFFS tanks. “The time commitments from our maintenance and operations personnel on scene are significant,” Ross said. “Our stated mission is to supply two planes and crews, but now we’re providing three and doing so very successfully. Our C-130s have retained a remarkable mission capable rate due to the hard work and dedication from the 302nd Maintenance Group, and getting large amounts of people and equipment out to support the operation doesn’t come together without the help of nearly every unit in the 302nd Mission Support Group.” Ross said the amount of drops happening wouldn't be possible without the extensive efforts of the 302nd MXG team committed to keeping the aircraft flying. Of the three aircraft the 302nd AW has supplied to the firefighting efforts, only one has been down so far due to maintenance issues which were resolved quickly. Another aircraft was down for a major inspection that takes a week during normal operations, but the team finished in just four days. Maintainers have been providing a 100% aircraft commitment rate for two months, which is unheard of according to Ross. Lt. Col. Richard Pantusa, 302nd AW aerial firefighting chief, said crews flying C-130s work alongside other aircraft such as federally-activated large and very large air tankers, Air Force RC-26 infrared imaging platforms, helicopters, aerial supervision and water scooper aircraft. They also work together with California State S-2 trackers and OV-10 broncos, helicopters and various other manned and unmanned planes. Aircraft from as far as Australia have been joining the fire suppression efforts this year. “It required careful coordination between wing leadership, our partner wings in the ANG, and the National Interagency Fire Center, to ensure that we were able to support the requirements of the firefighting effort this year,” Pantusa said. “Our MAFFS team never ceases to amaze me, with many of our operations, maintenance, and logistics folks jumping-in with overwhelming motivation to do this mission well.” Only experienced aircrew are eligible to become qualified to perform the dangerous aerial firefighting mission, said Pantusa. They’re selected from within the 731st AS aircrews and require several years of flying experience in a variety of deployed and domestic operations prior to meeting the initial MAFFS qualification threshold. Once they meet the requirement, they’re trained during an annual training event hosted by the U.S. Forest Service. All MAFFS-certified crews attend this training every year. The 302nd AW has 10 MAFFS-certified crews prepared to support the mission with three currently flying, swapped out weekly. In the 1970s, Congress established the MAFFS Program to aid the United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service. Typically, when all other civilian air tankers are activated but further assistance is needed, the U.S. Forest Service, through the National Interagency Fire Center, can request the aid of the U.S. Air Force's MAFFS flying units. MAFFS is a mission that highlights interagency cooperation. The 302nd AW works in concert with NIFC and the U.S. Forest Service. NIFC serves as a focal point for coordinating the national mobilization of resources for wildland fire. When it is determined MAFFS will be utilized, NIFC through U.S. Northern Command requests Air Force resources. Pantusa said conditions for wildfires in 2021 are at elevated levels over large portions of the Western United States, and all types of resources have been activated to support the national effort. The military aerial firefighting efforts are expected to continue through to the end of October. View original article: Reserve C-130 aerial firefighting teams fly during second busiest wildfire season > U.S. Air Force > Article Display (af.mil) View full article
  21. Good luck, you could always find some domes and make the hole thing. These could easily be painted on the inside. https://www.cobeads.com/p-1824986-decorative-glass-dome-cloche-cover-bell-jar-clear.html?currency=USD&msclkid=72aedbcdb5e213e7c30bba8c99b571d1&utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=EN-(US)Shopping Ads&utm_term=4582627042421697&utm_content=All Products
  22. Remembering the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001, provides little cause to celebrate for the vast majority of United States citizens, including members of the Armed Forces. Many face the day with somber reverence to the memory of all the victims and the heroes that sacrificed themselves that day (and for the 20 years since) so that others may live in peace and security. The significance is not lost on the Airmen of the 908th Airlift Wing, who, despite continuing to conduct tactical airlift missions around the globe, made it a priority to execute a flyover of Braly Stadium, home to the University of North Alabama Lions. “To see such a beautiful sight of your C-130 Hercules, lining up in a distance, coming directly behind and over the flagpole with the American Flag flying, with landing lights on, was the most incredible sight I've seen at a UNA football game,” said UNA alumnus and retired Army Col. Riley Brewer. “Many others have consented with my comment. I wish you could have heard the cheers and experienced the excitement that the 908th generated from the flyover.” The flyover occurred during the UNA vs. the University of Tennessee Chattanooga Mocs pre-game festivities on the 20th anniversary of the infamous attacks, and showcased the support and solidarity the U.S. Air Force Reserve shares with our community partners. Brewer, who helped coordinate the event, embraces the partnership and thanked everyone from the 908th from the command staff to the aircrew for making the flyover possible. “The 908th Airlift Wing played a huge part in making a day of remembrance and recognition successful,” he said. “We can't thank you enough for the sacrifices each Airman and family member makes to keep our country safe and secure.” The aircraft and crew were at the end of a long day, having already transported several members of the 908th AW’s 25th Aerial Port Squadron to Charleston Air Force Base, S.C., for training. Their re-routed their return to base over the residential section of Florence, Ala., home to the 130-acre campus. UNA Associate Athletic Director Ms. Megan L. Dye, who also helped coordinate the pre-game flyover, was impressed with the 908th’s demonstration of our commitment to U.S. citizens. “Yesterday was such a memorable day for our community,” she said. “We are so very grateful for your efforts and support of our event. I have been at North Alabama for almost 10 years, and it was truly my favorite moment during my time here.” The UTC Mocs defeated the UNA Lions by a score of 20-0. View Original article: 908th Airlift Wing remembers 9/11 with flyover > Youngstown Air Reserve Station > Article Display (af.mil)
  23. Remembering the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001, provides little cause to celebrate for the vast majority of United States citizens, including members of the Armed Forces. Many face the day with somber reverence to the memory of all the victims and the heroes that sacrificed themselves that day (and for the 20 years since) so that others may live in peace and security. The significance is not lost on the Airmen of the 908th Airlift Wing, who, despite continuing to conduct tactical airlift missions around the globe, made it a priority to execute a flyover of Braly Stadium, home to the University of North Alabama Lions. “To see such a beautiful sight of your C-130 Hercules, lining up in a distance, coming directly behind and over the flagpole with the American Flag flying, with landing lights on, was the most incredible sight I've seen at a UNA football game,” said UNA alumnus and retired Army Col. Riley Brewer. “Many others have consented with my comment. I wish you could have heard the cheers and experienced the excitement that the 908th generated from the flyover.” The flyover occurred during the UNA vs. the University of Tennessee Chattanooga Mocs pre-game festivities on the 20th anniversary of the infamous attacks, and showcased the support and solidarity the U.S. Air Force Reserve shares with our community partners. Brewer, who helped coordinate the event, embraces the partnership and thanked everyone from the 908th from the command staff to the aircrew for making the flyover possible. “The 908th Airlift Wing played a huge part in making a day of remembrance and recognition successful,” he said. “We can't thank you enough for the sacrifices each Airman and family member makes to keep our country safe and secure.” The aircraft and crew were at the end of a long day, having already transported several members of the 908th AW’s 25th Aerial Port Squadron to Charleston Air Force Base, S.C., for training. Their re-routed their return to base over the residential section of Florence, Ala., home to the 130-acre campus. UNA Associate Athletic Director Ms. Megan L. Dye, who also helped coordinate the pre-game flyover, was impressed with the 908th’s demonstration of our commitment to U.S. citizens. “Yesterday was such a memorable day for our community,” she said. “We are so very grateful for your efforts and support of our event. I have been at North Alabama for almost 10 years, and it was truly my favorite moment during my time here.” The UTC Mocs defeated the UNA Lions by a score of 20-0. View Original article: 908th Airlift Wing remembers 9/11 with flyover > Youngstown Air Reserve Station > Article Display (af.mil) View full article
  24. "The efficiency expert concluded his lecture with a note of caution. "You don''t want to try these techniques at home." "Why not?" asked somebody from the audience.. "I watched my wife''s routine at breakfast for years," the expert explained. "She made lots of trips between the refrigerator, stove, table and cabinets,often carrying a single item at a time. One day I told her, ''Hon, why don''tyou try carrying several things at once?''". "Did it save time?" the guy in the audience asked.. "Actually, yes," replied the expert. "It used to take her 20 minutes to make breakfast. Now I do it in seven."
  25. I remember reading that this or a similar jig has been in use since the start of C-130 production. Is that correct? Thanks, Koen
  26. Should be in a supplement to the 2J-T56 series T.O.s. If it is a commodity TCTO, it won't have a C-130 TCTO number.
  27. I couldn't anything in my info on that blade part number.
  28. Hi,I recently bought a few propeller blades and I was told they belonged to a three bladed C-130.Is any of you guys able to confirm this with the below data which is painted on one of the blades?BLADE SERIAL No.169448BLADE AND RET. ASSY. 6522969Would be great if I could find out to which aircraft/Air Force they belonged to.If I find out how to attach a picture to this message I will do so.Any info is much appreciated.Many thanks for your help.Greetings,JurgenNetherlands
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