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casey

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  1. A Philippine air force C-130 aircraft carrying combat troops crashed in a southern province while landing Sunday, killing at least 29 army soldiers on board and two civilians on the ground, while at least 50 were rescued from the burning wreckage, officials said. Some soldiers were seen jumping off the aircraft before it crashed and exploded around noon in the periphery of the Jolo airport in Sulu province, military officials said. Two of six villagers who were hit on the ground have died. Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana said rescue and recovery efforts were ongoing. The aircraft had 96 people on board, including three pilots and five crew and the rest were army personnel, the military said, adding 17 soldiers remained unaccounted for by nightfall. The pilots survived but were seriously injured, officials said. The Lockheed C-130 Hercules was one of two ex-U.S. Air Force aircraft handed over to the Philippines as part of military assistance this year. It crashed while landing shortly before noon Sunday in Bangkal village in the mountainous town of Patikul, military chief of staff Gen. Cirilito Sobejana said. Military officials said at least 50 people on board were brought to a hospital in Sulu or flown to nearby Zamboanga city and troops were trying to search for the rest. “Per eyewitnesses, a number of soldiers were seen jumping out of the aircraft before it hit the ground, sparing them from the explosion caused by the crash,” a military statement said. Initial pictures released by the military showed the tail section of the cargo plane relatively intact. The other parts of the plane were burned or scattered in pieces in a clearing surrounded by coconut trees. Soldiers and other rescuers with stretchers were seen dashing to and from the smoke-shrouded crash site. The plane was transporting troops, many of them new soldiers who had just undergone basic training, from the southern Cagayan de Oro city for deployment in Sulu, officials said. “They were supposed to join us in our fight against terrorism,” Sulu military commander Maj. Gen. William Gonzales said. Government forces have been battling Abu Sayyaf militants in the predominantly Muslim province of Sulu for decades. It was not immediately clear what caused the crash. Regional military commander Lt. Gen. Corleto Vinluan said it was unlikely that the aircraft took hostile fire, and cited witnesses as saying that it appeared to have overshot the runway then crashed in the periphery of the airport. “It’s very unfortunate,” Sobejana told reporters. “The plane missed the runway and it was trying to regain power but failed and crashed.” An air force official told The Associated Press that the Jolo runway is shorter than most others in the country, making it more difficult for pilots to adjust if an aircraft misses the landing spot. The official, who has flown military aircraft to and from Jolo several times, spoke on condition of anonymity because of a lack of authority to speak publicly. Initial pictures showed that the weather was apparently fine in Sulu although other parts of the Philippines were experiencing rains due to an approaching tropical depression. The airport in Sulu’s main town of Jolo is located a few kilometers (miles) from a mountainous area where troops have battled Abu Sayyaf militants. Some militants have aligned themselves with the Islamic State group. The U.S. and the Philippines have separately blacklisted Abu Sayyaf as a terrorist organization for bombings, ransom kidnappings and beheadings. It has been considerably weakened by years of government offensives but remains a threat. President Rodrigo Duterte expanded the military presence in Sulu into a full division in late 2018, deploying hundreds of additional troops, air force aircraft and other combat equipment after vowing to wipe out the Abu Sayyaf and allied foreign and local gunmen. Government forces at the time were running after Muslim armed groups a year after quelling the five-month siege of southern Marawi city by hundreds of militants linked to the Islamic State group. More than 1,000 people, mostly militants and long-elusive Abu Sayyaf commanders, were killed in months of intense air and ground assaults. Sunday’s crash comes as the limited number of military aircraft has been further strained, as the air force helped transport medical supplies, vaccines and protective equipment to far-flung island provinces amid spikes in COVID-19 infections. The Philippine government has struggled for years to modernize its military, one of Asia’s least equipped, as it dealt with decades-long Muslim and communist insurgencies and territorial rifts with China and other claimant countries in the South China Sea. Source: Philippine military plane crashes, 31 dead, 50 rescued (apnews.com) View full article
  2. A Philippine air force C-130 aircraft carrying combat troops crashed in a southern province while landing Sunday, killing at least 29 army soldiers on board and two civilians on the ground, while at least 50 were rescued from the burning wreckage, officials said. Some soldiers were seen jumping off the aircraft before it crashed and exploded around noon in the periphery of the Jolo airport in Sulu province, military officials said. Two of six villagers who were hit on the ground have died. Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana said rescue and recovery efforts were ongoing. The aircraft had 96 people on board, including three pilots and five crew and the rest were army personnel, the military said, adding 17 soldiers remained unaccounted for by nightfall. The pilots survived but were seriously injured, officials said. The Lockheed C-130 Hercules was one of two ex-U.S. Air Force aircraft handed over to the Philippines as part of military assistance this year. It crashed while landing shortly before noon Sunday in Bangkal village in the mountainous town of Patikul, military chief of staff Gen. Cirilito Sobejana said. Military officials said at least 50 people on board were brought to a hospital in Sulu or flown to nearby Zamboanga city and troops were trying to search for the rest. “Per eyewitnesses, a number of soldiers were seen jumping out of the aircraft before it hit the ground, sparing them from the explosion caused by the crash,” a military statement said. Initial pictures released by the military showed the tail section of the cargo plane relatively intact. The other parts of the plane were burned or scattered in pieces in a clearing surrounded by coconut trees. Soldiers and other rescuers with stretchers were seen dashing to and from the smoke-shrouded crash site. The plane was transporting troops, many of them new soldiers who had just undergone basic training, from the southern Cagayan de Oro city for deployment in Sulu, officials said. “They were supposed to join us in our fight against terrorism,” Sulu military commander Maj. Gen. William Gonzales said. Government forces have been battling Abu Sayyaf militants in the predominantly Muslim province of Sulu for decades. It was not immediately clear what caused the crash. Regional military commander Lt. Gen. Corleto Vinluan said it was unlikely that the aircraft took hostile fire, and cited witnesses as saying that it appeared to have overshot the runway then crashed in the periphery of the airport. “It’s very unfortunate,” Sobejana told reporters. “The plane missed the runway and it was trying to regain power but failed and crashed.” An air force official told The Associated Press that the Jolo runway is shorter than most others in the country, making it more difficult for pilots to adjust if an aircraft misses the landing spot. The official, who has flown military aircraft to and from Jolo several times, spoke on condition of anonymity because of a lack of authority to speak publicly. Initial pictures showed that the weather was apparently fine in Sulu although other parts of the Philippines were experiencing rains due to an approaching tropical depression. The airport in Sulu’s main town of Jolo is located a few kilometers (miles) from a mountainous area where troops have battled Abu Sayyaf militants. Some militants have aligned themselves with the Islamic State group. The U.S. and the Philippines have separately blacklisted Abu Sayyaf as a terrorist organization for bombings, ransom kidnappings and beheadings. It has been considerably weakened by years of government offensives but remains a threat. President Rodrigo Duterte expanded the military presence in Sulu into a full division in late 2018, deploying hundreds of additional troops, air force aircraft and other combat equipment after vowing to wipe out the Abu Sayyaf and allied foreign and local gunmen. Government forces at the time were running after Muslim armed groups a year after quelling the five-month siege of southern Marawi city by hundreds of militants linked to the Islamic State group. More than 1,000 people, mostly militants and long-elusive Abu Sayyaf commanders, were killed in months of intense air and ground assaults. Sunday’s crash comes as the limited number of military aircraft has been further strained, as the air force helped transport medical supplies, vaccines and protective equipment to far-flung island provinces amid spikes in COVID-19 infections. The Philippine government has struggled for years to modernize its military, one of Asia’s least equipped, as it dealt with decades-long Muslim and communist insurgencies and territorial rifts with China and other claimant countries in the South China Sea. Source: Philippine military plane crashes, 31 dead, 50 rescued (apnews.com)
  3. For more than a year now the 908th Airlift Wing has been faced with the task of figuring out how to protect its members and their families from COVID-19 while still being able to answer the nation’s call when it comes. One of the first things the wing commander, Col. Craig Drescher, said in readjusting the wing’s priorities was that, “we have to find a way to lean forward and still accomplish and preserve as much of the mission as possible.” In the last year, the wing has taken the commander’s words to heart, as it knew it was facing the largest deployment in the history of the 908th AW this year. To help showcase the wing’s motto, “Readiness in Strength,” the 908th held a wing-wide exercise in conjunction with one of the many monthly tactical airlift training weeks it has had in the past year. While exercise Auburn Tide, aptly named for Alabama’s only Reserve wing, didn’t feature every member of the wing, it did focus on many of the jobs needed to accomplish the tactical airlift mission of the wing. Featuring maintainers from the 908th Maintenance and Aircraft Maintenance Squadrons to fix, prepare and generate aircraft for missions; air transportation specialists from the 25th Aerial Port Squadron to pack, rig, and provide various equipment used for air drops; medical community members from the 908th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron and the 908th Aeromedical Staging Squadron to prepare and provide patient care to wounded members downrange, inflight, and at local medical treatment facilities; and lastly the aircrews that fly all of these important missions, either delivering supplies or troops to the front lines, or air evacuation mission of bringing members back to a safe treatment facility. “The main goal of this exercise is to ramp up our operations and challenge our members,” said Capt. Justin Bell, director of inspections for the 908th inspector general’s office. “We create situations that are tailored towards combat operations that are close to what we’ll encounter in a deployed environment. As an inspector I’m looking to ensure that all our members are ready to carry out the mission and can be deployment capable within 72 hours.” The ability to deploy anywhere, anytime at a moment’s notice is critical to the 908th’s tactical airlift mission. Auburn Tide will serve to bolster our Reserve Citizen Airmen’s readiness and mission capability. “While we’ve had our share of adversity this past year, the members of the 908th have consistently adapted and overcame every challenge,” said Drescher. “I have full confidence that our members will continue to be resilient and mission ready as they deploy.” Source: 908th Proves Readiness for Wing’s Largest Deployment during Exercise Auburn Tide > 919th Special Operations Wing > Article Display (af.mil)
  4. For more than a year now the 908th Airlift Wing has been faced with the task of figuring out how to protect its members and their families from COVID-19 while still being able to answer the nation’s call when it comes. One of the first things the wing commander, Col. Craig Drescher, said in readjusting the wing’s priorities was that, “we have to find a way to lean forward and still accomplish and preserve as much of the mission as possible.” In the last year, the wing has taken the commander’s words to heart, as it knew it was facing the largest deployment in the history of the 908th AW this year. To help showcase the wing’s motto, “Readiness in Strength,” the 908th held a wing-wide exercise in conjunction with one of the many monthly tactical airlift training weeks it has had in the past year. While exercise Auburn Tide, aptly named for Alabama’s only Reserve wing, didn’t feature every member of the wing, it did focus on many of the jobs needed to accomplish the tactical airlift mission of the wing. Featuring maintainers from the 908th Maintenance and Aircraft Maintenance Squadrons to fix, prepare and generate aircraft for missions; air transportation specialists from the 25th Aerial Port Squadron to pack, rig, and provide various equipment used for air drops; medical community members from the 908th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron and the 908th Aeromedical Staging Squadron to prepare and provide patient care to wounded members downrange, inflight, and at local medical treatment facilities; and lastly the aircrews that fly all of these important missions, either delivering supplies or troops to the front lines, or air evacuation mission of bringing members back to a safe treatment facility. “The main goal of this exercise is to ramp up our operations and challenge our members,” said Capt. Justin Bell, director of inspections for the 908th inspector general’s office. “We create situations that are tailored towards combat operations that are close to what we’ll encounter in a deployed environment. As an inspector I’m looking to ensure that all our members are ready to carry out the mission and can be deployment capable within 72 hours.” The ability to deploy anywhere, anytime at a moment’s notice is critical to the 908th’s tactical airlift mission. Auburn Tide will serve to bolster our Reserve Citizen Airmen’s readiness and mission capability. “While we’ve had our share of adversity this past year, the members of the 908th have consistently adapted and overcame every challenge,” said Drescher. “I have full confidence that our members will continue to be resilient and mission ready as they deploy.” Source: 908th Proves Readiness for Wing’s Largest Deployment during Exercise Auburn Tide > 919th Special Operations Wing > Article Display (af.mil) View full article
  5. Recently, the 189th Airlift Wing’s 154th Training Squadron was selected by Air National Guard leaders, to be the official home of the Guard’s C-130J training program. This preliminary decision is a milestone in solidifying the future for the 189 AW. While nothing changes for the foreseeable future for the unit’s C-130H training, the 154 TRS will stay in the business of what they do best… training TAC airlifters! The C-130 has supported the Air National Guard mission for more than 50 years, transporting troops, cargo, vehicles and much more. While the 189th’s formal training mission of training crews in the C-130H aircraft will continue for the lifecycle of the aircraft, the mission does not stop as the newer J models will slowly be integrated in the 189th fleet. The incorporation of the new aircraft also means the strengthening of our continued relationship with the 314th Airlift Wing, also located at Little Rock Air Force Base. “The 189 AW looks forward to a continued strong partnership with the 314th as we provide premier C-130 training to the Total Force and our allied partners,” said Col. Dean Martin, 189 AW commander. “Our aircrew and maintainers are top-of-the-line and we are ready to take the next step in support to our nation and state.” Although the most current information shows the wing receiving the first two J-model aircraft in the summer of 2023, the wing will continue its deliberate planning and coordination to be prepared to receive additional aircraft. “This is not the first time the Air Force has recapitalized its fleet and will likely not be the last time,” said Col. Jay Geaney, 189th Operations Group commander. “The wing itself has hosted many different types of aircraft since its inception and has taught us to be versatile and adaptable to change. The wing will operate in a split-fleet configuration for many years to come, which will require all our aircrew and maintenance expertise to train Airmen and support our mission.” The transition will ensure the wing is able to continue its legacy of training top C-130 aircrew. The combined efforts of the 314th and 189th Airlift Wings shows great promise in the continued training of combat airlift support around the globe. Source: 189th Airlift Wing selected as ANG C-130J training hub > 189th Airlift Wing > Article Display (af.mil)
  6. Recently, the 189th Airlift Wing’s 154th Training Squadron was selected by Air National Guard leaders, to be the official home of the Guard’s C-130J training program. This preliminary decision is a milestone in solidifying the future for the 189 AW. While nothing changes for the foreseeable future for the unit’s C-130H training, the 154 TRS will stay in the business of what they do best… training TAC airlifters! The C-130 has supported the Air National Guard mission for more than 50 years, transporting troops, cargo, vehicles and much more. While the 189th’s formal training mission of training crews in the C-130H aircraft will continue for the lifecycle of the aircraft, the mission does not stop as the newer J models will slowly be integrated in the 189th fleet. The incorporation of the new aircraft also means the strengthening of our continued relationship with the 314th Airlift Wing, also located at Little Rock Air Force Base. “The 189 AW looks forward to a continued strong partnership with the 314th as we provide premier C-130 training to the Total Force and our allied partners,” said Col. Dean Martin, 189 AW commander. “Our aircrew and maintainers are top-of-the-line and we are ready to take the next step in support to our nation and state.” Although the most current information shows the wing receiving the first two J-model aircraft in the summer of 2023, the wing will continue its deliberate planning and coordination to be prepared to receive additional aircraft. “This is not the first time the Air Force has recapitalized its fleet and will likely not be the last time,” said Col. Jay Geaney, 189th Operations Group commander. “The wing itself has hosted many different types of aircraft since its inception and has taught us to be versatile and adaptable to change. The wing will operate in a split-fleet configuration for many years to come, which will require all our aircrew and maintenance expertise to train Airmen and support our mission.” The transition will ensure the wing is able to continue its legacy of training top C-130 aircrew. The combined efforts of the 314th and 189th Airlift Wings shows great promise in the continued training of combat airlift support around the globe. Source: 189th Airlift Wing selected as ANG C-130J training hub > 189th Airlift Wing > Article Display (af.mil) View full article
  7. Several U.S. Air Force aircraft including F-16s, C-130s, and KC-135s have deployed to northern Africa for the continent’s largest exercise, African Lion. The exercise drew 7,000 participants from nine nations and wraps up June 18 with USAF aircraft flying alongside Moroccan aircraft for close air support training and C-130s airdropping personnel. “The arrival of fighters and tankers adds another level to this already dynamic exercise,” said Gen. Jeffrey L. Harrigian, U.S. Air Forces in Europe-Air Forces Africa commander, in a release. “Every flight brings another opportunity to work closely with our partners and exchange best practices so we can better pursue our shared goals.” F-16s from the 31st Fighter Wing at Aviano Air Base, Italy, and KC-135s from the 100th Air Refueling Wing at RAF Mildenhall, United Kingdom, arrived in Morocco on June 14. C-130Js from the 86th Airlift Wing at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, deployed even earlier. The F-16s conducted an Agile Combat Employment training event June 16, flying from Ben Guerir Air Base in Morocco, engaging in close air support missions at a nearby range, then landing at Guelmim Airfield to reload and refuel. The aircraft took off again, flew another mission, and returned to Ben Guerir. All told, the F-16s dropped seven 500-pound bombs, according to a release. The C-130s flew weapons, support equipment, and personnel to Guelmim as part of the ACE event. “The teams down at African Lion are taking ACE to the next level by executing it in Africa for the first time,” Harrigian said. “Demonstrating these capabilities in new austere locations solidifies our unmatched ability to rapidly deploy combat-credible forces to any location.” This year’s event is the first since 2019; the 2020 exercise was canceled because of the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to Morocco, Tunisia and Senegal also hosted activities as part of African Lion. Source: F-16s, C-130s, KC-135s Training in Morocco for Exercise African Lion - Air Force Magazine
  8. Several U.S. Air Force aircraft including F-16s, C-130s, and KC-135s have deployed to northern Africa for the continent’s largest exercise, African Lion. The exercise drew 7,000 participants from nine nations and wraps up June 18 with USAF aircraft flying alongside Moroccan aircraft for close air support training and C-130s airdropping personnel. “The arrival of fighters and tankers adds another level to this already dynamic exercise,” said Gen. Jeffrey L. Harrigian, U.S. Air Forces in Europe-Air Forces Africa commander, in a release. “Every flight brings another opportunity to work closely with our partners and exchange best practices so we can better pursue our shared goals.” F-16s from the 31st Fighter Wing at Aviano Air Base, Italy, and KC-135s from the 100th Air Refueling Wing at RAF Mildenhall, United Kingdom, arrived in Morocco on June 14. C-130Js from the 86th Airlift Wing at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, deployed even earlier. The F-16s conducted an Agile Combat Employment training event June 16, flying from Ben Guerir Air Base in Morocco, engaging in close air support missions at a nearby range, then landing at Guelmim Airfield to reload and refuel. The aircraft took off again, flew another mission, and returned to Ben Guerir. All told, the F-16s dropped seven 500-pound bombs, according to a release. The C-130s flew weapons, support equipment, and personnel to Guelmim as part of the ACE event. “The teams down at African Lion are taking ACE to the next level by executing it in Africa for the first time,” Harrigian said. “Demonstrating these capabilities in new austere locations solidifies our unmatched ability to rapidly deploy combat-credible forces to any location.” This year’s event is the first since 2019; the 2020 exercise was canceled because of the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to Morocco, Tunisia and Senegal also hosted activities as part of African Lion. Source: F-16s, C-130s, KC-135s Training in Morocco for Exercise African Lion - Air Force Magazine View full article
  9. The US Navy (USN) is accelerating plans to field the Lockheed Martin C-130J-30 Hercules in the Take Charge And Move Out (TACAMO) survivable nuclear communications role, with increased funding requested in the service's fiscal year (FY) 2022 budget proposal. The proposal released earlier in June lays out an accelerated plan to procure three C-130J-30 aircraft as test assets for the Boeing E-6B Mercury long-endurance command, control, and communications (C3) aircraft replacement programme. “The E-6 Recapitalization Program (E-XX) provides for air vehicle replacement and mission systems moderni ation for the aging E-6B aircraft and TACAMO mission,” the proposal said, adding, “Funds increase from FY21 to FY22 due to acceleration of the E-XX, following [an] National Airborne Operations Center (NAOC) Executive Airlift TACAMO (NEAT) analysis of alternatives”. With this accelerated funding for the three test aircraft, developmental test and funding is now slated for FY25. The budget proposal did not disclose intended aircraft numbers to be fielded operationally planned in-service date. The TACAMO mission is flown out of Located at Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma by Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron (VQ-3 and VQ-4). The 16 E-6B Mercury aircraft provides airborne capability for survivable, endurable and reliable airborne between the US National Command Authority (NCA) and the US strategic forces. “This mission is critical in the deterrence and management of a large-scale nuclear conflict,” the navy said. Source: US Navy accelerates TACAMO nuclear communications recap plan (janes.com)
  10. The US Navy (USN) is accelerating plans to field the Lockheed Martin C-130J-30 Hercules in the Take Charge And Move Out (TACAMO) survivable nuclear communications role, with increased funding requested in the service's fiscal year (FY) 2022 budget proposal. The proposal released earlier in June lays out an accelerated plan to procure three C-130J-30 aircraft as test assets for the Boeing E-6B Mercury long-endurance command, control, and communications (C3) aircraft replacement programme. “The E-6 Recapitalization Program (E-XX) provides for air vehicle replacement and mission systems moderni ation for the aging E-6B aircraft and TACAMO mission,” the proposal said, adding, “Funds increase from FY21 to FY22 due to acceleration of the E-XX, following [an] National Airborne Operations Center (NAOC) Executive Airlift TACAMO (NEAT) analysis of alternatives”. With this accelerated funding for the three test aircraft, developmental test and funding is now slated for FY25. The budget proposal did not disclose intended aircraft numbers to be fielded operationally planned in-service date. The TACAMO mission is flown out of Located at Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma by Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron (VQ-3 and VQ-4). The 16 E-6B Mercury aircraft provides airborne capability for survivable, endurable and reliable airborne between the US National Command Authority (NCA) and the US strategic forces. “This mission is critical in the deterrence and management of a large-scale nuclear conflict,” the navy said. Source: US Navy accelerates TACAMO nuclear communications recap plan (janes.com) View full article
  11. Two C-130J transport aircraft of Bangladesh Air Force landed at Bangabandhu Air Force Base Bangabandhu, Kurmitola, Dhaka from China on Sunday (June 13) with 6 lakh doses of Sinopharm vaccine and syringes to prevent coronavirus. Also Read: Bangladesh and Austria held Foreign Office Consultations virtually on 8 June 2021 Two C-130J transport aircraft of Bangladesh Air Force return home from China with 6 lakh dose of coronavirus vaccineBangladesh Armed Forces are conducting various activities to prevent coronavirus following the policy published by the Government of Bangladesh under the direction of the Hon’ble Prime Minister. Following this, as a sign of China’s friendly relations with Bangladesh, the Air Force completed two C-130J transport aircraft with 8 lakh doses of Sinopharm vaccine and syringes from China to prevent coronavirus from returning to the country. It may be mentioned that on Saturday (June 12), 26 Air Crew of Bangladesh Air Force and a representative of the Armed Forces Department of China went to China to collect coronavirus vaccine from China to prevent coronavirus through two C-130J transport planes of Bangladesh Air ForceHazrat Shahjalal left Dhaka International Airport for the purpose. Wing Commander Md. Habibur Rahman, GD (P) and Wing Commander Sheikh Murtaza Ghalib, GD (P) served as the Mission Commanders of these two C-130J transport aircraft. Source: Two C-130J transport aircraft of Bangladesh Air Force return home from China with 6 lakh dose of coronavirus vaccine - The Policy Times
  12. Three US Air Force C-130J Super Hercules aircraft from the 86th Airlift Wing, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, have arrived in Kenitra, Morocco, for exercise African Lion. The C-130 crews will train alongside their Moroccan counterparts to hone critical airdrop, airlift and aeromedical evacuation capabilities while enhancing interoperability with the Moroccans, the US Air Force said after the aircraft arrived on 9 June. “African Lion is an incredible opportunity for our Airmen to work shoulder-to-shoulder with our Moroccan partners as we develop essential capabilities for our forces,” said General Jeff Harrigian, US Air Forces in Europe-Air Forces Africa commander. “Together, we’re building a winning team that can ensure Africa’s future safety, security and prosperity.” Ahead of their arrival in Kenitra, the C-130s initiated a joint forcible entry via airborne assault where they led an airdrop team that successfully delivered over 150 US and British paratroopers from the 173rd Airborne Brigade, Vincenza, Italy, and the 16th Air Assault Brigade, Colchester, United Kingdom, to the drop zone in Grier Labouie, Morocco. Airborne insertions allow aircrew to sharpen vital airdrop skills as they rapidly and safely drop the maximum number of personnel at a specific location. This joint forcible entry also demonstrated the ability of the C-130s to operate effectively alongside US C-17 Globemaster III aircraft. The multi-platform event provided realistic training as Airmen quickly moved hundreds of service members from the European theatre to the African theatre. Additionally, the C-130s will fly a variety of day and night missions across throughout the two-week exercise. This week, US Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons and KC-135 Stratotankers will join the C-130s in African Lion’s Air Training Exercise. Joint Terminal Attack Control Airmen are also participating in the combined and joint exercise by training Moroccan JTACs and supporting airdrop operations in Grier Labouie and Tan Tan, Morocco. Training with partners throughout African Lion enables the multinational forces to build the enduring relationships necessary to confront the broad range of global challenges the African theatre currently faces, the US Air Force said. African Lion 2021 is US Africa Command’s largest, premier, joint, annual exercise hosted by Morocco, Tunisia and Senegal between 7 and 18 June. More than 7 000 participants from nine nations and NATO are taking part. Source: US Air Force C-130Js arrive in Morocco for Exercise African Lion - defenceWeb
  13. Two C-130J transport aircraft of Bangladesh Air Force landed at Bangabandhu Air Force Base Bangabandhu, Kurmitola, Dhaka from China on Sunday (June 13) with 6 lakh doses of Sinopharm vaccine and syringes to prevent coronavirus. Also Read: Bangladesh and Austria held Foreign Office Consultations virtually on 8 June 2021 Two C-130J transport aircraft of Bangladesh Air Force return home from China with 6 lakh dose of coronavirus vaccineBangladesh Armed Forces are conducting various activities to prevent coronavirus following the policy published by the Government of Bangladesh under the direction of the Hon’ble Prime Minister. Following this, as a sign of China’s friendly relations with Bangladesh, the Air Force completed two C-130J transport aircraft with 8 lakh doses of Sinopharm vaccine and syringes from China to prevent coronavirus from returning to the country. It may be mentioned that on Saturday (June 12), 26 Air Crew of Bangladesh Air Force and a representative of the Armed Forces Department of China went to China to collect coronavirus vaccine from China to prevent coronavirus through two C-130J transport planes of Bangladesh Air ForceHazrat Shahjalal left Dhaka International Airport for the purpose. Wing Commander Md. Habibur Rahman, GD (P) and Wing Commander Sheikh Murtaza Ghalib, GD (P) served as the Mission Commanders of these two C-130J transport aircraft. Source: Two C-130J transport aircraft of Bangladesh Air Force return home from China with 6 lakh dose of coronavirus vaccine - The Policy Times View full article
  14. Three US Air Force C-130J Super Hercules aircraft from the 86th Airlift Wing, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, have arrived in Kenitra, Morocco, for exercise African Lion. The C-130 crews will train alongside their Moroccan counterparts to hone critical airdrop, airlift and aeromedical evacuation capabilities while enhancing interoperability with the Moroccans, the US Air Force said after the aircraft arrived on 9 June. “African Lion is an incredible opportunity for our Airmen to work shoulder-to-shoulder with our Moroccan partners as we develop essential capabilities for our forces,” said General Jeff Harrigian, US Air Forces in Europe-Air Forces Africa commander. “Together, we’re building a winning team that can ensure Africa’s future safety, security and prosperity.” Ahead of their arrival in Kenitra, the C-130s initiated a joint forcible entry via airborne assault where they led an airdrop team that successfully delivered over 150 US and British paratroopers from the 173rd Airborne Brigade, Vincenza, Italy, and the 16th Air Assault Brigade, Colchester, United Kingdom, to the drop zone in Grier Labouie, Morocco. Airborne insertions allow aircrew to sharpen vital airdrop skills as they rapidly and safely drop the maximum number of personnel at a specific location. This joint forcible entry also demonstrated the ability of the C-130s to operate effectively alongside US C-17 Globemaster III aircraft. The multi-platform event provided realistic training as Airmen quickly moved hundreds of service members from the European theatre to the African theatre. Additionally, the C-130s will fly a variety of day and night missions across throughout the two-week exercise. This week, US Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons and KC-135 Stratotankers will join the C-130s in African Lion’s Air Training Exercise. Joint Terminal Attack Control Airmen are also participating in the combined and joint exercise by training Moroccan JTACs and supporting airdrop operations in Grier Labouie and Tan Tan, Morocco. Training with partners throughout African Lion enables the multinational forces to build the enduring relationships necessary to confront the broad range of global challenges the African theatre currently faces, the US Air Force said. African Lion 2021 is US Africa Command’s largest, premier, joint, annual exercise hosted by Morocco, Tunisia and Senegal between 7 and 18 June. More than 7 000 participants from nine nations and NATO are taking part. Source: US Air Force C-130Js arrive in Morocco for Exercise African Lion - defenceWeb View full article
  15. Make sure that the ring for the chain is connected to the side of the pin and not to the button. If the chain is connected to a ring on the button, it can release the pin if the chain is pulled on.
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