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  1. Today
  2. Sonny

    Watermelom Patch

    A farmer in the country has a watermelon patch and upon inspection he discovers that some of the local kids have been helping themselves to a feast. The farmer thinks of ways to discourage this profit eating situation. So he puts up a sign that reads WARNING; ONE OF THESE WATERMELONS CONTAINS CYANIDE! The farmer returns a week later to discover that none of the watermelons have been eaten, but finds another sign that reads, NOW THERE ARE TWO!
  3. Spectre623

    We Got Some Splaining to Do

    The reporter made more of it than it really was, like they were not strapped in. Those two had their monkey straps on and pulled tight. No problem look at me in my profile picture. I'm on the ramp of my Herk with my legs hanging off Wheeee having fun in Viet Nam!! Bill
  4. Yesterday
  5. https://news.usni.org/2018/12/06/kc-130t-accident-report-video-reconstruction
  6. MHeflin

    We Got Some Splaining to Do

    I'll bet the Wing King was none too happy about this, but he'll get over it. Love the picture. Go Night Owls! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMzMK7vHL_A
  7. munirabbasi

    NESA WINDOW HINGE INOPERATIVE

    Thanks Munir Abbasi
  8. DC10FE

    NESA WINDOW HINGE INOPERATIVE

    To get FAA certification, it was required that the civil version had to have 3 positive locking devices on each swing window, whereas the military version has just one locking device. The NESA systems are identical. Don R.
  9. munirabbasi

    NESA WINDOW HINGE INOPERATIVE

    No Munir Abbasi
  10. hehe

    NESA WINDOW HINGE INOPERATIVE

    Is the window arcing?
  11. As You Slide Down the Banister of Life, Remember: 1. Deleted by me!!! 2. Transvestite: A guy who likes to eat, drink and be Mary. 3. The difference between the Pope and your boss...the Pope only expects you to kiss his ring. 4. My mind works like lightning. One brilliant flash and it is gone. 5. The only time the world beats a path to your door is if you're in the bathroom. 6. I hate sex in the movies. Tried it once. The seat folded up, the drink spilled and that ice, well, it really chilled the mood. 7. It used to be only death and taxes were inevitable. Now, of course, there's shipping and handling, too. 8. A husband is someone who, after taking the trash out, gives the impression that he just cleaned the whole house. 9. My next house will have no kitchen - just vending machines and a large trash can. 10. A blonde said, "I was worried that my mechanic might try to rip me off. I was relieved when he told me all I needed was turn signal fluid." 11. I'm so depressed. My doctor refused to write me a prescription for Viagra. He said it would be like putting a new flagpole on a condemned building. 12. My neighbor was bit by a stray rabid dog. I went to see how he was and found him writing frantically on a piece of paper. I told him rabies could be treated, and he didn't have to worry about a Will. He said, "Will? What Will? I'm making a list of the people I want to bite." 13. Definition of a teenager? God's punishment for enjoying sex. 14. As you slide down the banister of life, may the splinters never point the wrong way.
  12. Ahmer

    NESA WINDOW HINGE INOPERATIVE

    INOPERATIVE WINDSHIELD ANTI−ICING Operation with inoperative windshield anti−icing is permissible provided. 1. The airplane is not flown in known icing. 2. The maximum speed limit below 10,000 feet is 185 KIAS due to possible bird strikes. Descent from high altitude into warm moist air with an inoperative nesa windshield anti−icing system will cause fogging and possible icing of the windshield. To minimize this, increase cabin air temperature and open the pilot’s and copilot’s windshield defogging valves. It is recommended that a gradual descent be made to allow the windshield, which has been cold−soaked at altitude, to warm with ambient cabin air.
  13. Multiple systemic failures on a massive scale, with overtones of criminal negligence. Everyone who touched this aircraft, inspected it, or supervised/commanded those who did are responsible for this tragedy. This is not about an individual making a mistake; it's about a cancerous system riddled with problems. My heart goes out to the families and loved ones. This on top of what they have already suffered is so unfair.
  14. munirabbasi

    NESA WINDOW HINGE INOPERATIVE

    Can we remove Electric connections of inoperative Swing Window? Munir Abbasi
  15. The Marine Corps determined that a corroded propeller blade that came off mid-flight was the cause of the July 10, 2017, crash of a KC-130T transport plane. This statement is BS!! Piss poor maintenance and oversight caused the crash that killed 15 Marines, 1 Sailor and devastated hundreds of others; family, friends and fellow Marines and Sailors.
  16. Last week
  17. EClark

    Merry Christmas!!

    Merry Christmas too you and your family!!
  18. hehe

    NESA WINDOW HINGE INOPERATIVE

    Typically NESA windows can be flown when in-op but it limits the pilots because they must avoid icing conditions. This would be a judgement call by YOUR aircrew members. Every Air Force or operator is different.
  19. Ahmer

    NESA WINDOW HINGE INOPERATIVE

    Plz check service news for NESA windows. Tnx regards
  20. moosemodeler

    54th WRS Christmas Drop 72/73 ?

    This the season ! Anyone here take part in the Christmas Drop from Andersen in 1972 or 73 ? Happy Holidays !
  21. munirabbasi

    NESA WINDOW HINGE INOPERATIVE

    Hello World Expertise PL Hing window inoperative (Electric Heating) of L-100 Hercules bat bird. Can bird fly at its normal altitude.Please describe limitation of NESA swing window and Difference of Military version and civil version hing window Munir Abbasi Home of hercules Pakistan
  22. That was a painful video to watch.
  23. Sonny

    Doctor Visit

    A man goes to the doctor and tells him that he hasn't been feeling well. The doctor examines him, leaves the room and comes back with three different bottles of pills. The doctor says, "Take the green pill with a big glass of water when you get up. Take the blue pill with a big glass of water after lunch. Then just before going to bed, take the red pill with another big glass of water." Startled to be put on so much medicine the man stammers, "My goodness, doc, exactly what's my problem?" Doctor says, "You're not drinking enough water.”
  24. Hello T56 Expertise plz any body describe about T56-a-15 signature check on c130 aircraft. Why we done on t56-a-15 engine and wt is purpose of this check. Tnx
  25. The Marine Corps determined that a corroded propeller blade that came off mid-flight was the cause of the July 10, 2017, crash of a KC-130T transport plane. That propeller did not go through proper maintenance the last time it was sent to an Air Force repair depot, which may have led to the damaged propeller remaining on the airplane that ultimately crashed and killed all 16 personnel onboard. The Marine Corps released a partially redacted Judge Advocate General Manual Investigation today, which found that “the investigation found the primary cause of this mishap to be an in-flight departure of a propeller blade into the aircraft’s fuselage. … The investigation determined that the aircraft’s propeller did not receive proper depot-level maintenance during its last overhaul in in September 2011, which missed corrosion that may have contributed to the propeller blade liberating in-flight,” according to a Marine Corps press release on the investigation. Marine Forces Reserve conducted the investigation and has made several recommendations for Naval Air Forces and for the Air Force to consider for their C-130 fleets. The Crash On July 10, 2017, a crew from reserve unit Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 452 (VMGR-452) departed their home station at Stewart Air National Guard Base in New York and flew to Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C. Their mission for the day was to transport six Marines and a Navy corpsman assigned to 2nd Marine Raider Battalion from North Carolina to Naval Air Facility El Centro, Calif., where the special operations unit was set to conduct pre-deployment training. The aircraft departed Cherry Point at 2:07 p.m. Its last transmission to local air traffic control was at 3:46 p.m., and the last radar contact with the plane was at 3:49, when the plane was flying at 20,000 feet altitude, according to the JAGMAN. The Marine Corps investigation found that Blade 4 on Propeller 2 (P2B4, in the report) became unattached, struck the port side of the fuselage, cut straight through the interior of the passenger area of the plane and became lodged in the interior of the starboard side of the plane. This damage kicked off a series of events that led to Propeller 3 colliding with the starboard side of the fuselage and ultimately the plane breaking into three pieces mid-air. The cockpit and the rear of the fuselage crashed into two separate debris fields in a soybean field near Itta Bena, Miss. The middle section of the plane, where the passengers were located, further broke up in the air. Marine Corps leadership made clear there was nothing the crew or passengers could have done to prevent the mishap or save themselves once the propeller blade broke loose. Brig. Gen. Bradley James, commanding general of 4th Marine Aircraft Wing, which oversees the reserve KC-130T squadron, wrote in the investigation report that “the initial incident that started the cascading failure was the liberation of a blade from the #2 propeller assembly. The subsequent events quickly led to structural failure of the aircraft. Neither the aircrew nor anybody aboard the KC-130T could have prevented or altered the ultimate outcome after such a failure.” Pictures of the Marines and sailor who died in a KC-130T cargo aircraft on July 10, 2017. USMC Photos Killed in the crash were: Maj. Caine Goyette, an active duty Marine who was flying the plane the day of the crash, who the report found was current on all his certifications and had 2,614 hours of flight time in military aircraft; Capt. Sean Elliott, an active duty Marine who co-piloted the plane and had 822 hours of military aircraft flight experience; Gunnery Sgt. Mark Hopkins, Gunnery Sgt. Brendan Johnson, Staff Sgt. Joshua Snowden, Sgt. Owen Lennon, Sgt. Julian Kevianne, Cpl. Collin Schaaff and Cpl. Daniel Baldassare, who were part of the VMGR-452 crew; and Staff Sgt. Robert Cox, Staff Sgt. William Kundrat, Sgt. Chad Jenson, Sgt. Talon Leach, Sgt. Joseph Murray, Sgt. Dietrich Schmieman and Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Lohrey, who were assigned to 2nd Marine Raider Battalion. Maintenance Failures Though no one on the plane could have stopped the events that unfolded, the maintenance community could have prevented them. The investigation found a failure to inspect the propeller during its last depot maintenance period, as well as missed opportunities during squadron-level maintenance to potentially notice the corroded blade. The plane itself was 24 years old and was last in depot maintenance at Warner-Robbins Air Logistics Complex (WR-ALC) in Georgia in August 2011 for blade overhauls. The Air Force complex is manned by civilian employees who rework and overhaul propellers and is the sole source of this overhaul work for Navy and Marine Corps C-130s. According to the JAGMAN, the Navy and Marine Corps require C-130 propellers to undergo an overhaul every 5,000 to 6,000 flight hours. Investigators studying the plane wreckage found not only corrosion in the Blade 4 Propeller 2, but found anodize coating inside the corrosion pitting – which means the corrosion was there during the 2011 overhaul, and instead of removing the corrosion and fixing the blade, the coating was applied over the damaged blade. “Negligent practices, poor procedural compliance, lack of adherence to publications, an ineffective [quality control/quality assurance] program at the WR-ALC, and insufficient oversight by the [U.S. Navy], resulted in deficient blades being released to the fleet for use on Navy and Marine Corps aircraft from before 2011 up until the recent blade overhaul suspension at WR-ALC occurring on 2 September 2017,” reads the JAGMAN, referring to the September “Redstripe” standdown of all Navy C-130s until further blade inspections could be conducted. Twelve of the 16 total blades on the plane that crashed – four blades on each of four propellers – “were determined to have corrosion that existed at the time of their last overhaul at WR-ALC, proving that over the course of the number of years referred to above, that WR-ALC failed to detect, remove and repair corrosion infected blades they purported to have overhauled. … Thirteen of the sixteen blades on the [mishap aircraft] had other discrepancies proving that, over the same span of years referred to above, WR-ALC was deficient in the effective application of the following steps: anodization, epoxy primer and permatreat,” the JAGMAN continues. Though less severe than the failure at the Air Force depot, the report noted concerns with maintenance practices within the squadron earlier in 2017, in the months before the crash. According to the JAGMAN, the squadron failed to establish a formal process to track and perform the 56-day conditional manual inspections of the propeller blades that can be triggered when the plane is not used or when the blades are not rotated for 56 days. Due to a lack of a clear procedure, on at least two occasions in 2017 a conditional inspection was triggered, but the squadron believed that separate inspections met the requirement and therefore the maintainers did not do the manual blade inspection. However, the investigation notes that it could not be determined whether a manual inspection could have identified the damage to the blade that led to it becoming detached mid-flight and causing the crash. Recommendations In August 2017, a Navy engineering team conducted a process audit at Warner-Robbins Air Logistics Complex and found that, even though the Navy and Marine Corps have separate blade overhaul procedures and standards from the Air Force, the civilian workforce had failed to track which blades belonged to which service and therefore which maintenance standards to apply. Only about 5 percent of the blades belong to Navy and Marine Corps planes, but the Navy recommended creating a standard work flow process and the Air Force agreed to adopt all the Navy’s processes. The report also recommends that Warner-Robbins Air Logistics Complex maintain electronic records of all blade overhauls that can be kept permanently, compared to the paper records that are discarded after two years. It also recommends greater Navy oversight of Navy/Marine Corps overhauls at Warner-Robbins, blade overhauls at a more frequent interval than 5,000 hours, and additional clarity on the 56-day inspections. View original article: https://news.usni.org/2018/12/06/marine-corps-corroded-propeller-blade-that-broke-loose-caused-2017-kc-130t-crash
  26. Spectre623

    1st USN NP-2000 C-130T

    Just read in "Defense News" the reason the Navy Herk went down last year was a cracked prop blade that broke off and hit the aircraft. The report said the crack was not properly treated in depot where it was discovered. New procedures are in place. This is what they mean when they say "military regs" are written in blood. Very true in many cases. Sad. Bill
  27. Sonny

    PSYCHIATRIC HOTLINE

    We've all had the annoying experience of calling up a hotline and waiting on the phone for eons to hear all the choices the lucky touch-tone dialers receive. Well, think how frustrating that would be if you were calling the: PSYCHIATRIC HOTLINE The telephone rings and an answering machine answers... "Welcome to the psychiatric hotline." If you are obsessive compulsive, please press one repeatedly. If you are codependent, please ask someone to press 2. If you have multiple personalities, please press 3, 4, 5, and 6. If you are paranoid/delusional, we know who you are, what you want, just stay on the line so that we can trace your call. If you are schizophrenic, listen carefully, and a little voice will tell you which number to press. If you are manic depressive, it doesn't matter which number you press....no one will answer anyway.
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