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118th AES Retired

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  1. I'm checking for other news sources for verification, but it looks like it might have been a 'J' Model based on preliminary reports. http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/europe/3091451/Military-plane-crashes-onto-tracks
  2. Thanks guys! I knew I could count on this group. BTW, anybody interested in receiving a copy of the History and Disposition Research Project for Nashville's 130 'A' models can send me a private message with your email address and I'll send it by email in Microsoft Word Format 118th AES
  3. Better to lose one to a tornado rather than a crash any day as long as nobody is injured or killed! In an ironic twist, one of our old 'A' models, 56-0517 went to Homestead as a ground trainer after it retired. She perished in Hurricane Andrew on 24 August 1992. What a way to go out! Take care of that 'H'. They were good birds and our CAMS guys did a great job maintaining them.
  4. Photos appear on this one: PISA, Italy, Nov. 23 (UPI) -- Five people aboard an Italian C-130 military transport plane died after it crashed Monday in Pisa, military sources said. Quoting unnamed Italian Air Force sources, the ANSA news agency reported that the plane, part of the 46th Air Force Brigade, crashed at 2:10 p.m. shortly after takeoff during a training exercise in Pisa. Eyewitnesses reported seeing the plane spin out of control before it crashed in flames. The plane came down just outside the airport area and onto the tracks of the local rail line, Pisa Mayor Marco Filippeschi told the news service. Military sources told ANSA that Defense Minister Ignazio La Russa was being briefed on the accident. Early reports didn't indicate a cause of the crash. http://poleshift.ning.com/profiles/blogs/five-die-in-italian-c130-crash
  5. I just posted "The Legend" story under the Historical Forums.
  6. “The Legend of How the 118th/105th TAW Got New Planes†As Told By: MSgt. James L. Reynolds (ret) 118th AES Tennessee Air Guard When I began my service with the Tennessee Air National Guard in 1984, I “cut my teeth†on the C-130 ‘A’ models. By the time I retired in 2004, we had transitioned to C-130 H-2 Models, and in between I logged time on the C-9A, KC-135, C-141, C-5A, as well as the C-130 ‘A’, ‘B’, ‘E’, and ‘H’ models. Yet this is the story of how we finally got new ‘H’ models in 1989-1990. Major General Carl Wallace was perhaps the best Adjutant General to have ever served the State of Tennessee. He is remembered as “a soldier’s soldierâ€, or in my case, “an airman’s soldierâ€. There are two things that General Wallace is perhaps noted for: One was his straightforward speaking of his mind, and the other is that he always made it a point to visit all of Tennessee’s Guard Units during their annual training. As I stated in the introduction, when I entered my period of service in 1984, the Tennessee Air Guard was still flying ‘A’ model C-130s. The majority of those of us who were crewmembers were younger than the airplanes we were flying on as all were built between 1953 and 1957. Each year when General Wallace would visit and hold his open forum with the troops, the question of the day was always the same, “General, when are we going to get new airplanes?†Finally, in about 1988, the General was able to answer, “Next year!â€. Now what I am about to tell you comes from eyewitness accounts, and my own recollection of history. Most of this story is based on the words of General Wallace himself, and in some cases, it has been necessary to paraphrase the General’s words. Many times, it always seemed that the Pentagon viewed the Tennessee Air Guard (and most Guard Units) as “step-childrenâ€. Most everything we had in the way of equipment was “hand-me-down†equipment and was usually worn out by the time it filtered into the guard system. In my own unit, our “equipment†consisted basically of a few litters, an old Sam Suction, a broken Bird respirator, and a foot locker full of old bandages. All of the ‘A’ models had seen time in Viet Nam and many were said to have flown for the CIA under the cover of Air America. Many had been replaced with other ‘A’ models over the years as the CAMS crews were no longer able to patch up the old ones or their airframe life simply ran out. Were it not for a fantastic group of CAMS personnel, our old ‘A’s wouldn’t have been able to stay up and running as long as they did. In 1988, Tennessee had a very powerful U.S. Senator in Washington by the name of James Sasser who served in the U.S. Senate from 1977-1995. While in the Senate, Sasser served as the Chairman of the Senate Budget Committee; Chairman of the Appropriations Committee’s Subcommittee on Military Construction’ Chairman of the Banking Committee’s Subcommittee on International Finance and Military Policy; Chairman of the Governmental Affairs Committee’s Subcommittee on General Services, Federalism, and the District of Columbia; and chairman of the Appropriations Committee’s Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch. In other words, “Senator Sasser was powerful in Washington!†Senator Sasser was also a friend of General Wallace and of the National Guard. He wanted to see the Tennessee Air Guard get new planes as bad as any of us did. According to General Wallace’s account, the Pentagon had assured the General that Tennessee would get replacements for the ‘A’ models. The only thing was that the replacements would not be new airplanes, but more “hand-me-down†airplanes that would come about as a result of the 1988 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) commission decisions. General Wallace said that he told the Pentagon that “Hell no! Tennessee was going to get %&$! new airplanes!†About this time, the U.S. was deeply pushing the so-called “War on Drugs†and was spending billions of dollars on this cause. Allegedly, Senator Sasser threw in an amendment to a bill involving the “War on Drugs†and the money was earmarked to buy 16 brand new C-130 ‘H-2’ model planes for Tennessee. And so it was, that the new airplanes began arriving in 1989-1990. The USAF also decided that under the BRAC recommendations, they would be downsizing many units. They were taking four airplanes from squadrons with 16 airplanes in this downsizing. This is where they were going to get the airplanes that the Pentagon originally offered. When the USAF came to Tennessee and said that they wanted 4 of the new airplanes back, General Wallace was livid! And so the new question asked of General Wallace was, “General, is the USAF going to take four of our new planes?†General Wallace’s reply was, “Hell no! I told the Pentagon that those &$%!* airplanes belong to Tennessee; not the Pentagon and that they were purchased with money outside of the Pentagon budget. They can’t have them!†The legend continues that the Pentagon didn’t take the planes, but what they did do was to cut the funding for the flying hours for those planes. Not to worry though; General Wallace had an answer for that too: “I got me a U.S. Senator who controls money and we’ll get the money to operate those planes just the same as we got the money to buy them:, said Wallace. Things went well until Senator Sasser was beaten by Fred Dalton Thompson in his bid for re-election. Then, the Pentagon eventually took away the 4 planes. Today, the ‘H’ models are all leaving the base thanks to the recommendations of the 2005 BRAC recommendations, and Nashville almost lost its C-130 mission altogether. Today, Nashville is once again receiving “hand-me-down†equipment from the Pentagon. Payback? All I know is that I have many fond memories of flying the old ‘A’ models, as well as the newer C-130s that came about. I also know that no matter what mission and equipment the Pentagon gives the 118th/105th, the Tennessee Air National Guard will always outperform the rest of the units. I also know that the CAMS guys will do the best with what they have and will keep the birds airborne.
  7. I finally finished my history project for now on the 'A' models. My "contact" is out of country right now but is to update me when he gets back on the current staus of things out there. I'm also headed out to the base on UTA weekend (5 Dec) for a Retirement/Christmas/Old Timer Reunion and may get some updates then. Here is the list as I have it of the 'H' models we had when I left: 1. 89-1051 (c/n 382-5198) 2. 89-1052 (c/n 382-5199) (*slated for AC-130U) 3. 89-1053 (c/n 382-5201) (*slated for AC-130U) 4. 89-1054 (c/n 382-5203) (*slated for AC-130U) 5. 89-1055 (c/n 382-5204) 6. 89-1056 (c/n 382-5205) (*slated for AC-130U) 7. 89-1181 (c/n 382-5188) 8. 89-1182 (c/n 382-5190) 9. 89-1183 (c/n 382-5192) (*now a SIGNIT bird) 10. 89-1184 (c/n 382-5193) 11. 89-1185 (c/n 382-5194) 12. 89-1186 (c/n 382-5195) 13. 89-1187 (c/n 382-5196) 14. 89-1199 (c/n 382-5197) 15. 90-1057 (c/n 382-5240) 16. 90-1058 (c/n 382-5241) I'll publish the story I wrote on "The Legend of How the 118th Got New Airplanes" later. I have to transcribe it from the hard copy as the computer I had it stored on crashed. 118th AES Retired 89-1183 (c/n 382-
  8. Five die in Italian C-130 crash Published: Nov. 23, 2009 at 3:05 PM PISA, Italy, Nov. 23 (UPI) -- Five people aboard an Italian C-130 military transport plane died after it crashed Monday in Pisa, military sources said. Quoting unnamed Italian Air Force sources, the ANSA news agency reported that the plane, part of the 46th Air Force Brigade, crashed at 2:10 p.m. shortly after takeoff during a training exercise in Pisa. Eyewitnesses reported seeing the plane spin out of control before it crashed in flames. The plane came down just outside the airport area and onto the tracks of the local rail line, Pisa Mayor Marco Filippeschi told the news service. Military sources told ANSA that Defense Minister Ignazio La Russa was being briefed on the accident. Early reports didn't indicate a cause of the crash. © 2009 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. http://www.upi.com/Top_News/International/2009/11/23/Five-die-in-Italian-C-130-crash/UPI-72691259006744/
  9. Italian C-130 crashes, 5 dead The Associated Press Posted : Monday Nov 23, 2009 17:00:30 EST ROME — An Italian air force transport plane crashed onto train tracks near a military airport in the Tuscan city of Pisa on Monday and burst into flames, killing its five-member crew, officials said. Air force Col. Mauro Gabetta said the C-130 was on a training flight and was approaching the airport when it suddenly veered away and then crashed. The cause of the crash is under investigation. The Pisa fire department said the plane crashed onto railway tracks, setting afire electrical wires. No train was in the area at the time. Source: http://www.airforcetimes.com/news/2009/11/airforce_c130_crash_112309w/
  10. What a beautiful photo! It's too bad that they closed Sewart. Today, the TN Army National Guard uses part of the base. Several years ago when MG Carl Wallace was our AG, there was a proposal by some developers to purchase the assets of the Tennessee National Guard on Sidco Drive near the now defunct 100 Oaks Mall in Nashville. At the same time, American Airlines was expanding in Nashville and the Metro Nashville Airport Authority was wanting to use the space occupied by the 118th/105th TAW. MG Wallace proposed selling the property on Sidco to the developers and letting the Airport Authority have the 118th/105th property. Under MG Wallace's plan, these units would have all moved out to the former Seward AFB in Smyrna. Well, it sounded good and looked good on paper. However, the Town of Smyrna and Rutherford County now own those facilities. They had other plans and they didn't go along with it. "History that almost was." 118th AES Retired
  11. Thanks to all who have helped me with my project in tracking down the history and disposition of the C-130 'A' models that were once assigned to the 118th/105th in Nashville! Anyone interested in receiving a copy in Microsoft Word format can sent me your email address via private message and I'll be happy to send a copy to you. I've be able to find a lot of photos and I need some help identifying the units (and putting a timeline) with regard to the tail identifiers on some of the birds. I need assistance with the following. YP (55-0004) HCA (55-0045) MT (55-0047) AG (55-0047, 55-0468, 55-0547) VG (55-0468) SG (56-471, 56-0504, 56-0517) HCL (56-0500) HCN (56-0500) NCM (56-0518) WG (56-0523) NG (56-0529, 57-0464) OB (57-0457) Thanks! 118th AES Retired
  12. Hmmm......Roy Reagan and T&G That says a lot right there. I bet if you do some more research, the name Glen Conrad will turn up as well....especially with Zaire being in the mix.
  13. Nashville now has WCs as the H2s were taken away and reassigned under BRAC. Some of the H2s became gunships while others went to other units. I just finished the "research project" on the old 'A' models that were assigned to the 118th/105th in the past and my plan is to start working on the same type of project with the 'H' models we had. We weren't really sure what the mission of the 118th/105th would be after BRAC, but luckily they did survive as a C-130 unit, although we lost our own airplanes. Nashville now trains foreign pilots on the C-130 missions. The 118th AES, my former unit was slated to move to Ft. Worth under BRAC, but fortunately it survived in Nashville. At one time, BRAC even considered Nashville for the C-27J but that didn't happen. I'll post more info as I get it and get started on the new research project. 118th AES Retired
  14. For what it is worth, I've posted the information on 56-0484 that I have been able to come up with in my research of the C-130 'A' models that once were assigned to the 118th/105th in Nashville. This is the only one that I have been able to come up with that once had the A-II conversion. It would appear that it was converted back though. However, it may be that this aircraft is being prepared to fly again???? The N137FF is still listed as "reserved" on the FAA inquiry. It was last known to be sitting in storage as was mentioned in another post here. This was one of the aircraft that was probably tied up with Hemet Valley Flying service in the whole U.S. Forestry Service Scandal and the fallout from that as well as the assets of Hemet Valley Flying Service. I've posted this "for what it is worth" and maybe this is just another piece of the puzzle relative to the A-II conversion. 118th AES Retired 56-0484 c/n 3092 56-0484 was listed as a “former†aircraft of the 118th TAW in the yearbook From Blackwood Field to Berry Field published in 1986. This aircraft was converted to a C-130A-II at one time, and then back to a C-130A by 1972. At the time of the conversion to the C-130A-II, she was assigned to the 7506th Support Squadron at Rhein-Mein, Germany. The 7506th was a reconnaissance squadron with quite a bit of history. She arrived at the 7506th in June 1958 as the squadron’s first C-130A-II. She departed the 7506th in April 1972. In August 1972, she was assigned to the 924th TAG (AFRES) at Ellington AFB, TX. In April 1973, she was assigned to the 919th TAG (AFRES) at Duke Field, FL. In June 1973 she was assigned to the 133rd TAG (ANG) at Minneapolis-St. Paul MAP in Minnesota. In January 1974 she was assigned to the 118th TAG (ANG) in Nashville. In February 1976, she was assigned back to the 133rd TAG at Minneapolis St-Paul. In October 1981 she was assigned to the 356th TAS (AFRES) at Rickenbacker AFB, OH. In January 1987, she was retired and sent to AMARC at Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ. She went on to become an aerial tanker bomber registered as N137FF flying for Hemet Valley Flying Service. She was scrapped in 2000. Hemet Valley Flying Services is one company rumored to have close ties to the CIA according to numerous sources and official documents, and was at the center of the now infamous U.S. Forestry Service Tanker Scandal. It is possible that 56-0484 went on to serve with the CIA after her military retirement? , . , , , , As with many of the former aircraft of the 118th/105th, if these aircraft could tell their stories, they would certainly tell some very interesting stories. For a glimpse of the kinds of missions that 56-0484 was involved in prior to her life with the 118th/105th, visit the link in the endnotes. 56-0484 was also one of the 22 C-130 ‘A’ models involved in the now infamous U.S. Forestry Service tanker scandal. Hemet Valley Flying Service as well as T&G were two of the companies involved and were at the center of the transactions. J. Baugher’s accounting of 56-0484 is as follows: 484 (c/n 182-3092) converted to C-130A-II, back to C-130A by Aug 1972.To AMARC as CF0063 Jan 1987. To US Forest Service as N137FF June 1988. Reregistered to Hemet Flying Service as N137FF Aug 1988. Airframe never left AMARC. To CF0079 May 1989 and parted out. Seen in scrapyard 8/28/2000. Although 56-0484 was registered to Hemet Flying Service, it appears that it never “officially†left AMARC, and thus was never painted as Hemet tanker as noted in Baugher’s notes above. Bob Daley’s photos of 56-0484 below in the scrapyard also seem to verify this in that the aircraft was clearly marked in its’ military scheme when scrapped. According to an inquiry on the FAA Registry Database, an FAA Registration Certificate was issued for 56-0484 on 18 August 1988, registering the aircraft as N137FF. The status shows “Undel Triâ€, indicating that Hemet never followed through with the formal registration and airworthiness certification. In all likelihood, the explanation as to why this aircraft was registered but never left the scrapyard may in fact be that it was involved in the U.S. Forest Service tanker scandal and was tied up in litigation. The author notes also that T&G, the registered owner of the aircraft when it was registered with the FAA was also involved in a liquidation of assets which were subsequently taken over by International Air Response. To this date, the registration of N137FF is still reserved to T&G even though this company no longer exists as such. Photos of 56-0484 can be viewed on the following links: http://www.amarcexperience.com/ScrapyardsPictureLookup.asp?Filename=PictureDatabase\Scrapyards\AACF0079_560484_Allied.jpg http://www.planepictures.net/netshow.php?id=777522 http://www.herkybirds.com/gallery/files/1/0/5/3092_original.jpg http://www.herkybirds.com/gallery/files/1/0/5/3092b_original.jpg http://www.herkybirds.com/gallery/showimage.php?i=695&catid=searchresults&searchid=320 http://www.herkybirds.com/gallery/files/1/0/5/3092d_original.jpg http://www.herkybirds.com/gallery/files/1/0/5/3092e_original.jpg http://www.herkybirds.com/gallery/files/1/0/5/3092f_original.jpg http://www.herkybirds.com/gallery/files/1/0/5/3092g_original.jpg http://www.herkybirds.com/gallery/showimage.php?i=697&catid=searchresults&searchid=320 http://www.herkybirds.com/gallery/files/1/0/5/3092i_original.jpg
  15. Here is the information that I have been able to collect on 56-0512 as of 22 November 2009. Thanks to all who have contributed to my history project thus far! Not much information is available on 56-0512 and not many photos were found of this aircraft. The aircraft was assigned to the 118th and was listed as a “former†aircraft of the 118th in the 1986 publication From Blackwood Field to Berry Field 1921-1986. This aircraft arrived at AMARC on 20 May 1976, and was assigned the AMARC control # CF007. The AMARC database shows that this aircraft had previously been assigned to the 166th Tactical Airlift Group in Greater Wilmington. J. Baugher’s account of this aircraft is as follows: 512 (c/n 182-3120) to MASDC as CF0007 May 20, 1976. Converted to ground trainer as GC-130. Seen at Paul Garber facility of NASM. It is possible that 56-0512 may have been involved as a part of the “Blind Bat†program as I did find one post listing this tail number as one having been involved in the program.
  16. Here is the information that I have on hand relative to 55-0033 as of 22 November 2009. Thanks to all who have contributed thus far to my history project! According to AMARC database records, this aircraft arrived at AMARC on 17 October 2002. It was assigned AMARC control #CF 077. At last report, it was transferred to National scrapyard on 13 February 2003. The current status of the aircraft is unknown. I received the following information regarding 55-033 from a contributor by email: “55-033 Delivered to the USAF 02/57 and went to772tcs at Ardmore AFB OK. In 1958 it went to the 815tcs at Ashiya Ab Japan. In 1960 the 815tcs went to Tachikawa AB Japan, in 1967 it went to the 374tcw at Naha AB Okinawa. In 06/73 to the 105 TAS Tenn. ANG at Nashville. IN1977 to 1980 it was at 155tas Tenn ANG at Memphis. In 1980 it went back to the 105 tas then 1989 it went to AMARC. 55-045 delivered to the USAF in 05/57 463 TCW at Ardmore AFB OK. It went to the 315 AD 1964 and to the 374tcw in 1972 to the SVAF and written off in 1975, not much on this one. 55-047 delivered to the USAF in 05/57 and it went463 TCW at Ardmore AFB OK.In 1958 to the 815tcs at Ashiya AB, Japan then to Tachikawa Japan. In 1967, 374 TCW at Naha AB Okinawa. IN 1971 it went to 195tas CA ANG at Van Nuys. In 1972 to the 167 TAS at WV ANG Martinsburg. In 1974 it went to the 155TAS Tenn ANG at Memphis. In 1977 it went to the 185tas OK ANG at Oklahoma City. In 1979 to105tas TN ANG at Nashville. In 1982 to 154cg Hawaii ANG, and then to AMARC in 198-.†(edited) J. Baugher’s information on 55-0033 is as follows: 033 (c/n 182-3060) to AMARC as CF0077 Jan 25, 1989. Delivered to National Aircraft as scrap Oct 2002. 55-0033 does have a report on the AMARC database and shows that it was delivered to National on 25 January 1989.
  17. Still working on my "history project" Boy, I'm really having a hard time finding any information on this one. Here's what I have so far: Not much information is available on 56-0512 and not many photos were found of this aircraft. The aircraft was assigned to the 118th and was listed as a “former†aircraft of the 118th in the 1986 publication From Blackwood Field to Berry Field 1921-1986. This aircraft arrived at AMARC on 20 May 1976, and was assigned the AMARC control # CF007. The AMARC database shows that this aircraft had previously been assigned to the 166th Tactical Airlift Group in Greater Wilmington. J. Baugher’s account of this aircraft is as follows: 512 (c/n 182-3120) to MASDC as CF0007 May 20, 1976. Converted to ground trainer as GC-130. Seen at Paul Garber facility of NASM. It is possible that 56-0512 may have been involved as a part of the “Blind Bat†program as I did find one post listing this tail number as one having been involved in the program. If anyone can provide any info on 56-0512 along with the others I've posted as needing informaiton on, I certainly would appreciate it! Thanks to all who have helped and who have contributed information!
  18. I found this post this morning while trying to find info on 56-0512. The link is as follows: http://www.arcforums.com/forums/air/lofiversion/index.php?t122246.html Not sure how reliable the information is, but there appears to be a list of various tail numbers of "Blind Bat" aircraft. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Some photos for people who want to make a black bottom one that's not a gunship. Blind Bat was the project name for 347 TAw C-130As that carried out flare missions over Viet Nam and the Ho Chi Mihn Trail. They were involved in restricting movement of supplies to SVN. For a good view of the program. Look at Sam's C-130 page. It is difficult to read but very illuminating. Hats off to all of those brave men. Some were modified with similar electronics as the early AC-130As, with RHAW antennas on the nose, rear fuselage and tail. There was also a belly radome and a large blade antenna in front of and to the right of that radome. There was also what appears to be an channel strips to smooth the air flow under the open cargo ramp. It was attached to the bump on the lower ramp door. Tail codes and acft sns were red. Some Blind Bats had whte tail codes and early aircraft had just the undersurface white replaced with black. Later aircraft had the black extend further up the fuselage. These are some tail numbers that I have collected. The list is not definitive, nor do I have photos of all of them. I would write down the tail number of Blind Bats that I saw, whether in some one's photo collection or in a magazine article. Unfortunately, I neglected to list where I saw them. Sorry. So errors most certainly have creeped in. YD 21 TAS Tail code and sn color 55-0005 red 55-0007 red 55-0023 white 55-0046 red 56-0483 red 55-0005 red 56-0508 red 56-0517 white 56-0533 no code? YJ 35 TAS 55-0044 white 55-0048 red 56-0471? 57-0469 white YU 41 TAS 56-0471 red 56-0495 white 56-0500 white 56-0512 red YP 817 TAS 55-0006? ?
  19. In researching the C-130 'A' Models once assigned to the 118th/105th TAW, I can find VERY LITTLE information on 56-0485. The only information I have been able to find thus far is as follows: This aircraft entered AMARC on 17 October 2002 and was assigned AMARC # CF090 and was last reported on AMARC’s records on 19 July 2002. According to records, the aircraft was subsequently transferred to Dross Metals (DMI) also known as Aircraft Restoration and Marketing (ARM). This aircraft also appears on the DMI scrapyard inventory list in the AMARC database. J. Baugher’s accounting of 56-0485 is as follows: 485 (c/n 182-3093) to AMARC as CF0090 Jul 6, 1990. If anyone can provide any further information on 56-0485, I certainly would appreciate it!
  20. I am continuing in my research project of 'A' models that once were assigned to the 118th/105th TAW (TNANG) in Nashville. I am looking for any additional information I can find on 56-0484. Here is what I have thus far: This aircraft was converted to a C-130A-II at one time, and then back to a C-130A by 1972. At the time of the conversion to the C-130A-II, she was assigned to the 7506th Support Squadron at Rhein-Mein, Germany. The 7506th was a reconnaissance squadron with quite a bit of history. She arrived at the 7506th in June 1958 as the squadron’s first C-130A-II. She departed the 7506th in April 1972. In August 1972, she was assigned to the 924th TAG (AFRES) at Ellington AFB, TX. In April 1973, she was assigned to the 919th TAG (AFRES) at Duke Field, FL. In June 1973 she was assigned to the 133rd TAG (ANG) at Minneapolis-St. Paul MAP in Minnesota. In January 1974 she was assigned to the 118th TAG (ANG) in Nashville. In February 1976, she was assigned back to the 133rd TAG at Minneapolis St-Paul. In October 1981 she was assigned to the 356th TAS (AFRES) at Rickenbacker AFB, OH. In January 1987, she was retired and sent to AMARC at Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ. She went on to become an aerial tanker bomber registered as N137FF flying for Hemet Valley Flying Service. She was scrapped in 2000. Hemet Valley Flying Services is one company rumored to have close ties to the CIA according to numerous sources and official documents, and was at the center of the now infamous U.S. Forestry Service Tanker Scandal. It is possible that 56-0484 went on to serve with the CIA after her military retirement? , . , , , , As with many of the former aircraft of the 118th/105th, if these aircraft could tell their stories, they would certainly tell some very interesting stories. For a glimpse of the kinds of missions that 56-0484 was involved in prior to her life with the 118th/105th, visit the link in the endnotes.
  21. I'm looking for information on 56-0471 for my research project on the C-130 'A' fleet formerly assigned to the 118th TAW/105th TAW of the TNANG in Nashville. What I do have thus far is: this airplane was known as "The Blind Bat". It served with the 463rd TAW/35th TAS at Naha AB, Okinawa (circa 1969) & the 139th TAS NY ANG (circa 1972-75) / 105th TAS (1976) and then with the 147th TAS of the Deleware ANG (circa 1976-77) and then back to the 105th TAS (1977-1981). It was a test aircraft for the Black Crow Truck Ignition Locating System. Upon retirement, she went to AMARC on 23 April 1990 (CF 0087) and was eventually sold to National and broken up. If anyone has any further information on this a/c or experiences with her, please be so kind as to share that with me if you would like to have the information added in my research project. Thanks!
  22. The Iron Lung Outlet originally was to power the Iron Lung as has been suggested here. To be honest though, I never saw an Iron Lung on a C-130, but then again, those were before my time. In recent years, the Iron Lung Outlet has been used for the Vanner Inverter which inverts the 28 VDC to 110 VAC 50/60 Hz. As you may know, the 110 VAC onboard the C-130 is 400 Hz cycles. The Vanner allows the use of equipment (in particular medical equipment) that is not rated at 400 Hz. On the other hand, the Impact 308M patient suction was designed to operate on 50-400 Hz. and therefore could be plugged in directly to the 110 VAC outlets of the aircraft because the suction had been modified.
  23. Was Buddy Adkins a member of your group? Also an IO named Hasselman? Those names don't ring a bell. I'll look back at the yearbook that the 118th published back in 1986 and see if I see them in there anywhere.
  24. I sent my email address to you by private message. Thanks! 118th AES Retired
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