• Latest Forum Posts

    • C-130 Refurb Workcards
      By bischoffm · Posted
      So you say your looking for the old work cards. digitally might be as much a challenge as paper copies.  But I will look at what I have on old disk
    • HF radio
      By AMPTestFE · Posted
      "ECBs" kind of gives that one away, doesn't it guys?
    • Tired Dog
      By Sonny · Posted
      An old, tired-looking dog wandered into the yard. I could tell from his collar and well-fed belly that he had a home.

      He followed me into the house, down the hall, and fell asleep on the couch. An hour later, he went to the door, and I let him out. The next day he was back, resumed his position on the couch and slept for an hour. This continued for several weeks. Curious, I pinned a note to his collar: "Every afternoon your dog comes to my house for a nap."

      The next day he arrived with a different note pinned to his collar: "He lives in a home with four children -- he's trying to catch up on his sleep. Can I come with him tomorrow?"
    • C-130 Photo of the Week 2015-08-03
      By Casey · Posted
      USAF RC-130A 57-0519 c/n 3226            
      View full record
    • Woodpecker
      By Sonny · Posted

      A Hawaii woodpecker and a California woodpecker were arguing about which place had the toughest trees. The Hawaii woodpecker said Hawaii had a tree that no woodpecker could peck. The California woodpecker accepted his challenge, and promptly pecked a hole in the tree with no problem. The Hawaiian woodpecker was in awe.

      The California woodpecker then challenged the Hawaiian woodpecker to peck a tree in California that was absolutely unpeckable. The Hawaiian woodpecker expressed confidence he could do it, so accepted the challenge. After flying to California, the Hawaii woodpecker successfully pecked the tree with no problem.

      So the two woodpeckers were now confused. How is it that the Californian woodpecker was able to peck the Hawaiian tree and the Hawaiian woodpecker was able to peck the Californian tree, but neither one was able to peck the tree in their own state?

      After much woodpecker-pondering, they both came to the same conclusion - your pecker is always harder when you're away from home.
    • Successful Son
      By Sonny · Posted
      One Sunday, in counting the money in the weekly offering, the Pastor of a small church found a pink envelope containing $1,000. It happened again the next week!

      The following Sunday, he watched as the offering was collected and saw an elderly woman put the distinctive pink envelope on the plate. This went on for weeks until the pastor, overcome by curiosity, approached her.

      "Ma'am, I couldn't help but notice that you put $1,000 a week in the collection plate," he stated.

      "Why yes," she replied, "every week my son sends me money and I give some of it to the church."

      The pastor replied, "That's wonderful. But $1000 is a lot, are you sure you can afford this? How much does he send you?"

      The elderly woman answered, "$10,000 a week."

      The pastor was amazed. "Your son is very successful; what does he do for a living?"

      "He is a veterinarian," she answered.

      "That's an honorable profession, but I had no idea they made that much money," the pastor said. "Where does he practice?"

      The woman answered proudly, "In Nevada .. He has two cat houses, one in Las Vegas, and one in Reno"
    • Animal Reasearch
      By Sonny · Posted
        A rabbit broke out of the laboratory where he had been born and raised. As he scurried away, he felt grass under his little feet and saw the dawn breaking, for the first time in his life. "Wow," he thought. "This is great." It wasn't long before he came to a hedge. After squeezing under it, he saw a wonderful sight -- lots of other bunny rabbits, all free and nibbling at the lush grass.

      "Hey," he called. "I'm a rabbit from the laboratory and I've just escaped. Are you wild rabbits?" "Yes, come and join us," they cried. Our friend hopped over to them and started eating the grass. It tasted so good. "What else do you wild rabbits do?", he asked. "Well," one of them said. "You see that field there? It's got carrots growing in it. We dig them up and eat them."

      This he couldn't resist and he spent the next hour eating the most succulent carrots. They were wonderful. Later, he asked them again, "What else do you do?" "You see that field there? It's got lettuce growing in it. We eat that as well."

      The lettuce tasted just as good and he returned a while later completely full. "Is there anything else you guys do?" he asked. One of the other rabbits came a bit closer to him and spoke softly. "There's one other thing you must try. You see those rabbits there," he said, pointing to the far corner of the field. "They're girls. We have sex with them. Go and try it."

      Well, our friend spent the rest of the morning at this until, completely exhausted, he staggered back over to the guys.

      "That was fantastic," he panted. "So are you going to live with us then?", one of them asked. "I'm sorry, I had a great time, but I can't." The wild rabbits all stared at him, a bit surprised. "Why? We thought you liked it here."

      "I do," our friend replied. "But I must get back to the laboratory. I'm dying for a cigarette."
    • C-130 News: AF Special Operations Command receives first AC-130J
      By Casey · Posted
      HURLBURT FIELD, Fla. (AFNS) -- The first AC-130J Ghostrider landed here July 29, making it Air Force Special Operations Command’s first AC-130J.

      After completing the initial developmental test and evaluation by the 413th Flight Test Squadron at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, the aircraft will be flown by the 1st Special Operations Group Detachment 2 and maintained by the 1st Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron during its initial operational tests and evaluations at Hurlburt Field.

      “Putting it through these tests will allow us to wring out the AC-130J in a simulated combat environment, instead of the more rigid flight profiles in formal developmental testing,” said Lt. Col. Brett DeAngelis, the 1st SOG Det. 2 commander. “Now that we know the equipment works when we turn it on, it’s our task to determine the best way to employ our newest asset.”

      For most, the new gunship is the future.

      “The AC-130J brings new technology to the table for AFSOC with more efficient engines, improved fuel efficiency and the ability to fly higher, further and quieter,” said Master Sgt. Michael Ezell, the 1st SOAMXS production superintendent. “Additionally, the modified weapons system it possesses is a precision strike package that was collected from the older models, such as the laser-guided bombs and AGM-176 Griffin bombs, and combined to give us all the capabilities of the AC-130W Stinger II and AC-130U Spooky all in one package.”

      The AC-130J is a modified MC-130J Commando II, containing advanced features that will enable it to provide ground forces with an expeditionary, direct-fire platform that is persistent, suited for urban operations and capable of delivering precision munitions against ground targets.

      “This is an exciting transition as we move the AC-130J from the test community to the operational community,” DeAngelis said. “While we still have initial operational testing in front of us to accomplish, it will now be done by aircrews selected for their combat expertise, instead of their testing background.”

      A cadre of 60 aircrew and maintainers were selected by the Air Force Personnel Center to stand up the program, and there will be an additional 30 contractors to help work on the new gunship.

      “We will be training on the airplane, getting all the qualifications and hands-on experience we need to be able to perform operational testing in order to give an exact picture of how this plane will operate in a real-world environment,” Ezell said. “Our focus right now is to learn how to maintain the aircraft and the operators will learn how to fly it and get ready for (initial operational test and evaluation), which should start later this year.”

      Airmen were hand selected to work on the new AC-130J; they encompass a solid background and level of expertise on C-130Js. The maintenance team cadre came from Little Rock AFB, Arkansas, Dyess AFB, Texas, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico, Davis-Monthan AFB, Arizona, and Cannon AFB, New Mexico.

      “As more AC-130Js are produced and delivered, the older models will slowly be retired,” DeAngelis said. “Until then, we’ll hold on to them while the AC-130J completes operational tests and the fleet becomes abundant in numbers.”

      Operational testing is expected to be complete in spring 2016.

      “Det. 2’s mission is simple; ‘Get it right,’” DeAngelis said. “And we have the right group of people to do just that.” View original article...  
      View full article
    • C-130 Photo of the Week 2012-10-01
      By Casey · Posted
      USAF C-130E 62-1834 c/n 3797          
      View full record
    • Ghost Rider Getting Painted
      By Spectre623 · Posted
      Thanks guys, it was an honor to be a tiny part of the team here at the museum to bring her to this point. Bill
  • C-130 Tail # to c/n Converter

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  • ABOUT THE C-130

    Proposals were received from Boeing, Douglas, Fairchild and Lockheed. Lockheed won the competition and was awarded a contract to produce two prototype YC-130 aircraft on July 2, 1951. The first flight of the YC-130 took place on Aug. 23, 1954, at Lockheed's Burbank, Calif., plant. The airplane's performance was exceptional and far exceeded both the USAF’s and even some of Lockheed’s own engineer’s expectations. Its four turbo-prop engines enabled YC-130 to take-off in only 800 feet. In addition to its tremendous lift capability, the aircraft also proved to be far more maneuverable than expected while meeting or exceeding all of the other USAF performance requirements.
     
    As for early challenges, one of the major obstacles was foregoing the urge to incorporate new technologies. At the time, Lockheed was designing and producing the most advanced aircraft in the world. To many within the company the YC-130 was ungainly and represented a step backwards in aircraft engineering. For perspective, in the 1950s, aviation design had moved into the jet-age with sleek airframes with swept-back wings being the norm. In contrast, the YC-130 used an un-swept, high-wing design that placed the fuselage on the ground and was powered by four turbo-prop engines.
     
    The first production C-130A had its first flight at Marietta, Ga., on April 7, 1955. It was similar to the prototypes but featured a revised nose, four powerful Allison T56-A-lA turbo-prop engines, each delivering 3,750 horsepower and driving a three-bladed Curtiss-Wright electric-reversible propeller.
     
    An early problem developed with the propeller pitch-changing mechanism that was corrected by adopting a hydraulic model, and eventually, a four-bladed Hamilton Standard propeller was adopted.
     
    The C-130 was not a giant-sized aircraft by the standards of its time, but it featured a large unobstructed, fully-pressurized cargo hold which could rapidly be reconfigured for the carriage of troops, stretchers or passengers box. Coupled with its tremendous lift capacity, long-range, and austere landing field capabilities, it gave the air forces of the world something that had not previously existed: a tactical airlifter. The C-130’s high-wing design places the cargo floor at truck-bed height above the ground. The C-130 also features an integral "roll- on/roll-off" rear-loading ramp and the ability to be quickly reconfigured cargo, troop transport or airdrops of troops and/or equipment into battle zones. More impressively, it could fulfill the need for low landing speeds and short-field capability while still being able to maintain a cruising speed of 365 miles per hour at an altitude of ~35,000 feet.
     
    Moreover, the C-130 airframe immediately was recognized to have incredible versatility, prompting it to be quickly adapted for use in supporting special mission requirements. The first of some 70 different variants – a “drone launcher/director” or DC-130A – was built in 1959. As is the case with many of the special mission C-130s, all of the special equipment was removable, thus permitting the aircraft to be used as freighters, assault transports, or air ambulances.
     
    The first C-130A (#53-3129) flew on April 7, 1955, and deliveries began in December 1956. The “A” model featured four three-bladed Allison T56-A-9 turboprops. A total of 231 aircraft were produced.
     
    Deliveries of the C-130B began in June 1959. A total of 230 were produced. The “B” model introduced the four-bladed Allison T56-A-7 turboprops, carried additional fuel in the wings and had strengthened landing gear.
     
    Deliveries of the C-130E began in April 1962. The “E” was an extended-range development of the C-130B. The maximum ramp weight of the E-model increased to 155,000 pounds (70,307 kilograms), 20,000 pounds (9,072 kilograms) more than the B-model. Its fuel capacity was increased by over 17,000 pounds (7,711kilograms). More powerful Allison T-56-A-7A engines were used and a pair of 1,360-gallon under-wing external fuel tanks was added. A total of 491”E” models were produced.
     
    Deliveries of the C-130H began in July 1974. The “H” model was fitted with updated T56-A-T5 turboprops, a redesigned outer wing, updated avionics and other minor improvements. 1087 “H” models were produced.
     
    A commercial version of the C-130 designated the L-100 was also produced in the 1960s, 70s and 80s. The L-100 evolved into the L-100-20 and the L-100-30. The -20’s fuselages were lengthened by some 100-inches and the -30s by some 180-inches. The “dash 30” (-30) configuration was eventually adopted for use on the C-130H. Compared to the “short” models of the C-130 with a 40-foot cargo compartment, the C-130H-30 has a 55-foot cargo compartment providing space for 30 percent more cargo or 40 percent more personnel.
     
    The C-130J is the newest-generation of the C-130. It is a military derivative of the Lockheed Martin Aeronautics baseline model 382J-01G civil aircraft configuration. The “J” incorporates an integrated digital avionics suite with head-up displays, new propulsion system and other major systems upgrades that reduce operating costs and crew size while offering significant performance improvements.
     
    Adapted form Lockheed C-130 Programs Fast Facts Dated 8 May 2012

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