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    • Casey
      C-130 News: Across the world in eight days
      By Casey · Posted
      The engine cranked on as vibrations coursed through the cargo bay. Outside the small windows, he could see the propellers spinning into action as his C-130 taxied out for departure from the 136th Airlift Wing at Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, Texas. Secured to one side of the bay, he acclimated to the constant hum of the aircraft and as they took off, he braced and prepared for the bumpy ride to destinations unknown. For the rest of the aircrew, this occurrence was a regular day at the office, but for Airman 1st Class John Karley, 136th Maintenance Squadron propulsion technician, this was all a first.

      Karley had worked on C-130’s for more than two years with the Texas Air National Guard, but until now, had never actually flown in one. More than that, he had never left the country. But as they lifted off at seven that morning that would change. During an eight-day deployment with his unit, Karley would visit Hawaii, Australia, Samoa, and Guam.

      “I was honestly in awe the entire time,” said Karley. “I’d never really thought I would have an opportunity to go anywhere with the Air Force, besides maybe a Middle East deployment. Initially, when they told me about the trip, I thought it was just a training exercise. I definitely didn't expect to go to the places we did. I’d only been to Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Missouri in my entire life. Don’t get me wrong, I wasn't a secluded child, but we weren't big travelers as a family.”

      After a quick refueling stop in San Diego, his initial escapades took him on a brief overnight to Hawaii and then crew made their way to the second stop, American Samoa. During the course of the flight, Karley got called to report up to the flight deck. He thought there was some type of engine malfunction, but was relieved to know that the issue wasn’t an aircraft problem at all.

      “When I got up to the flight deck, our commander tells me we are about to cross the Equator,” Karley said. “I was excited, and at that moment realized how far I truly was from home. I didn’t know there was more to it though, when the commander informed me of a tradition in the Air Force that the first time you fly over the equator, you have to put all your clothes on backwards. I thought he was joking around with me, until I saw two other crew members beginning to turn their shirts around. It was fun and a great experience, I was just glad to be part of it.”

      The crew arrived in Samoa around 9 p.m. The small group of islands rest in the South Pacific Ocean between Hawaii and New Zealand. He didn't see anything until the next morning, but when Karley woke up, he arose to a humid climate and beautifully scenic mountain range. Having never been out of the central time zone, this new scenery was beyond anything he could have expected.

      On extended trips, the C-130 crews take an engine mechanic along with them, so in the event of an aircraft issue, they have someone proficient who can analyze and fix the problems effectively. Karley, along with one other technician, maintained regular inspections of the aircraft throughout the trip. After fixing a few maintenance glitches, he was able to explore the local area before they departed the next day.

      “Every moment I was there I kept thinking, I can’t believe I am halfway around the world,” he said. “Samoa was definitely my favorite stop on the entire trip. The people were great and it was just a gorgeous place. Then the next day we headed out for Cairns, Australia, and had to cross the International Date Line. That was crazy for me because we took off Friday morning and landed in Australia Saturday night. Calling family, it was kind of hard to comprehend the time difference at first. On top of that, being in another country was so much to take in. In Australia, the accents, and them driving on the other side of the road was so interesting for me.”

      Thirty minutes south of Cairns was Townsville, Australia. They would stop here and pick up a load of equipment before traveling to Guam and Wake Island. Karley was able to explore the World War II historical land mark, and then as they made their last stop back in Hawaii before heading back to mainland America, he was able to take in more of the island and enjoy his final day on the beach swimming and staring out at the crystal blue water. After eight days, the crew touched back down in Fort Worth, in the 105 degree Texas heat.

      “I’ll never forget that experience, literally being on the opposite side of the world,” Karley reminisced. “It’s not something you can just take in and go on with your life. Texas is beautiful, but that was completely different. The scenery, the water and beaches, and the mountains. It was unforgettable, and I am so thankful that I got a chance to go. It gave me a new perspective on the world and my aircraft, and now I’m excited about the next trip. Anywhere I can go, I’ll take it.”
        Source: https://www.dvidshub.net/news/208385/across-world-eight-days
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    • Casey
      C-130 News: Lockheed Martin scores $287.2 million contract for another five C-130Js
      By Casey · Posted
      Lockheed Martin Corp. secured a $287.2 million contract modification Friday for five more C-130J transport planes — a program that has been scoring a lot of wins as of late. These five aircraft are being tacked onto a $5.4 billion, multi-year contract for various C-130Js. That contract, which was awarded in November 2015, called for the delivery of up to 83 C-130J variants over the next five years. This most recent award ups that figure to 88. The additional five were "added during congressional budget submittals,” that have come out of defense budget negotiations on Capitol Hill, an Air Force spokesman wrote in an email. Sponsored by   The additional five were "added during congressional budget submittals,” that have come out of defense budget negotiations on Capitol Hill, an Air Force spokesman wrote in an email. Last week, Lockheed won a $10 billion indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity (IDIQ) contract to provide up to 100 additional C-130Js until 2026. An IDIQ isn’t a firm order, but rather it allows for customers to place orders against that $10 billion ceiling. That contract would allow for foreign military sales and it will give Congress room to place orders beyond what is included in the multi-year contract. After fiscal 2018, when the multi-year contract expires, it will be the primary vehicle to buy C-130Js until 2026. Lockheed (NYSE: LMT) is having a lot of success in part because of the versatility of the plane and the need to replace aging transports. "Lockheed Martin's C-130J is a plane everyone wants because it's so effective in many roles and relatively economical to operate," Rebecca Grant, president of Iris Independent Research, a D.C.-based public policy research organization, wrote to me in an email in November. It has the ability to perform "airlift and airdrop in rugged environments necessary to anti-terrorism operations,” Grant added, with the U.S. Coast Guard using it for patrol and the U.S. Marines turning it into a refueling plane. Ben Harper, a partner and head of Boston-based Fairmont Consulting Group’s aerospace practice, called it the "Swiss Army Knife of transport planes.” He added that it also compares favorably to its competitors, the troubled A400M aircraft from Airbus and the less-popular KC-390 from Embraer. "It’s got a lot it can do and the other programs that might compete with it and occupy the same space just don’t have nearly that same level of track record,” Harper said, adding that the competition doesn’t "have the same number of built-out and proven mission sets and capabilities." Source: http://www.bizjournals.com/washington/news/2016/08/29/lockheed-martinscores-287-2-million-contract-for.html Image: http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/press-releases/2013/may/0514aero-C-130j-million-flight-hours.html   y           <img src="http://media.bizj.us/view/img/10129086/jason-phillips-5721562*100xx1500-2000-0-0.jpg"alt="Jason Phillips">    
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    • f4enut
      35th TAS Patch
      By f4enut · Posted
      I would like to buy a 35 TAS Patch if anyone has a spare . I was the flight line Maintenance Officer with the 35th in 1968. I lost mine and it is the only patch from my Air Force Career that I do not have. Thanks for any help in getting one. Barry Sanders USAF Retired
    • DC10FE
      Tail flash
      By DC10FE · Posted
      HA! An old Dyess bird.  I remember when they still had that new car smell to them.  That didn't last very long.  I think it went to The Rock in 2012. Don R.
    • DC10FE
      Tail flash
      By DC10FE · Posted
      I have mild dyslexia, so I can understand.  I had to triple check my TOLD cards after filling them out.
    • pinball
      Tail flash
      By pinball · Posted
      Hey Don, Took this at the Chicago Air and Water Show a couple of weeks ago . . . recognize the tail number?  From the Connecticut Guard.  They were dropping the Leapfrogs (the Golden Knights were using their own airplane, because the rumor is the 'Frogs and Knights can't jump the same airframe anymore after the fatality last year). Kim
    • Casey
      Tail flash
      By Casey · Posted
      Indeed it is 0332.  I flip numbers like that all the time.  I really need to get in the habit of double checking.  
    • DC10FE
      Tail flash
      By DC10FE · Posted
      Casey, it's actually 80-0322 (msn 4903).  My guess is the yellow tail flash is that of the 118th AS of the Connecticut ANG.  Their patch is also mainly yellow. That photo was taken by my friend Sean O'Brien in 7/28/16 @ Shannon. The photo below is the Georgia ANG's tail flash, also from my friend Sean on 5/07 @ SNN. OK, I think we've beat this to death!  Thanks for all your help. Don R.
    • Sonny
      Birthday Gift
      By Sonny · Posted
      Two old guys were chatting.....

      One said to the other: "My 85th birthday was yesterday. The wife gave me an SUV".

      Other guy responded: "Wow, that's amazing!!..... Imagine, an SUV!!.. What a great gift!"

      First guy: "Yup !!.... Socks, Underwear and Viagra!"
    • Casey
      Tail flash
      By Casey · Posted
      Makes more sense than the 158th.  I just saw that 118th switched to C-130Hs in 2013.  Must be it.  Oddly though, "The AMARG Experience" says that it was inducted from the 158th. 
  • Today in C-130 History

    1974-8-30
    Destroyed when cargo exploded on ground at Galbraith Lake, Alaska, 200 kilometers south of Prudhoe Bay.   View Aircraft Profile(s): 4209
      
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  •  Date LPN Model Status Reg: Owner/Operator Command Division Wing Group Squadron Flight Location
    2016-08-XX 5026 MC-130H act 86-1699   USAF AFSOC 1 SOW 19 SOS Hurlburt Field AFB, FL
     
     
    2016-08-XX 5002 HC-130H act 116   USFS
    Paint/Markings: Red and white USFS colors
     
    2016-07-11 4102 TC-130H wfu 65-0962   AMARG Davis Monthan AFB, AZ
     
     
    2016-07-07 5095 C-130H wfu 86-1392   AMARG Davis Monthan AFB, AZ
     
     
    2016-06-29 5157 C-130H w/o 88-4404   AMARG Davis Monthan AFB, AZ
    Note: PCN 542762
     
     
     
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