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Aero Precision provides OEM part support for military aircraft operators across more than 20 aircraft

Jake

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core_pfieldgroups_2

  • First Name
    Wayne
  • Last Name
    Mumbower
  • core_pfield_13
    God, Camping, college football, son

core_pfieldgroups_3

  • core_pfield_11
    F-111 Maintenance Mtn Home 1981 - 1986
    C-130 FE Dyess/Little Rock 1986 - 1992
    C-141 FE McChord 1992 - 1998
    Commercial C-130 FE/Check Airman SAT 1994 - 1998
    C-130 FE Dobbins/Hill 1998 - 2008
    PFPS/JMPS instructor 2008 -
  • core_pfield_12
    Ogden, Utah
  • Occupation
    work to live - teach aircrews mission planning
  1. An interesting note to the Refuel switch connecting the K11. All of Southern Air's L382's had the capability. On Aircraft 919SJ (4147) for some reason the switch for the light in the refueling panel had been modified so it would tie the K11 rather than the refuel switch
  2. Get your FCF checklist out if you are dealing with the USAF. There is a procedure for downspeeding and shutting down the utility sytem seperately to determine if the problem is rigging. There is more to it but the FCF checklist will help troubleshooting
  3. I think the 2 closest full power on stalls I know about are the dyess bird that went down at Pope in '88 (I think) when the parachute for the heavy came out the crew was at full power and essentially they flew it to the groound (where they pancaked). For the stall they were not able to produce enough thrust to get speed but they had enough to not plummet to earth. The other was the power on stall in afghanistan with the MC that went into the hill. Even in in that extreme pullup they lost speed but had enough lift to break their fall - so-to-speak. While a power on stall is a horrible thing to
  4. Potentially - the rest of your life While it has never happened in a herk (aside from the Dyess plane that was able to restart) You could probably get an hour out of a good battery. a little more if you don't use instruments or talk in the headset. But Without electrical power all your Karma is gone - Land Now!
  5. I heard, but never cared to look into it deeper, that the difference had to do with two different factors: the slower lights had a plastic gear on the motor which, if activated while the aircraft was going faster than 170 could jam or break, therefore it was not so much that the lights couldn't take the high speed, rather it was the gear on the motor and the speed. As long as you didn't try to retract them or extend them you would supposedly not have a problem. Having said that, 10,000 hours on herks (a lot of B and E time) and I never had a landing light break. When I flew 141's they were 250
  6. Just supporting Mikes response. If this is a rebuilt engine then bumping the starter will not help. you simply have to wait about 15 minutes (as Mike stated) until the compressor cools and the blades cool which will reduce the clearance and allow the compressor to rotate. Once you get the airplane on the ground there was (about 5 years ago) a Maintenance procedure for breaking in the engine which amounted to starting and shutiing down the engine multiple times
  7. Just supporting Mikes response. If this is a rebuilt engine then bumping the starter will not help. you simply have to wait about 15 minutes (as Mike stated) until the compressor cools and the blades cool which will reduce the clearance and allow the compressor to rotate. Once you get the airplan on the ground their was (about 5 years ago) a Maintenance procedure for breaking in the engine which amounted to starting and shutiing down the engine multiple times
  8. Don, I can't remember my call sign yesterday obviously you retained more brain cells. While I don't remember the call sign - I never did Rhein Main rotes and I don't remember the "ask" call sign so "old" must have been the bravo call sign from Mildenhall
  9. I suspect that Dobbins will have a ton of things if you can find someone there - Bill Estes can maybe point you in a direction
  10. Jake

    Bad Bombs

    Was that in the early 90's? I remember the loadmasters and the JAI being downgraded for missing the chute attachement rigging. It managed to put a hole in the assault zone which made the engineers happy. but the happiness ended when they reopened the assualt strip less than 24 hours later
  11. If you are sending engine troops then it probably doesn't matter which box you send them too as all the AF simulators can replicate the -7 or -15 numbers as can the folks in Tampa. That said, Dyess, Dobbins, and Minnesota are traditional -15 bases Little Rock, McChord, and Pope (I think the Sim is still there??) are traditional -7 bases. Tampa is expensive but worth it. If you are in touch with the folks at Little Rock - they can give you the numbers to the other boxes Good Luck
  12. years ago there was an airplane at the depot that had a similar problem but it wasn't noticeable immediately after takeoff. sometimes it would yaw/roll after just a few minutes and other times it would take upwards of a half an hour. turns out the pipe that is installed to allow easy transfer of fuel from the outboard section of the outboard tank to the inboard section of the outboard tank (I think it was #4) was installed backward. Fuel was transferring to the outboard section of #4 but could not easily return to the inboard section. The fuel quantity was always balanced and we never let the
  13. Bob, In the later model H's and all the L-382's when you turn on the dump pumps you charge the dump manifold but as long as you leave the X-valves closed fuel stays in the manifold. The next step is to open an external tank x-feed valve which would allow the fuel to charge the x-feed manifold as well. you also had to ensure the fuel was reaching the pressure gauge which might require you to open the center seperation valve. Once the needle started dancing, you went back to tank-to-engine. you had to really pay attention as you didn't want to cause a fuel imbalance - or worse, starving an engin
  14. Bob, The system is the same as H models witrh switch controlled X-valves. The difference is that U.S. military crews are not taught to standpie while Southern Air crews used it quite often to verify fuel quantity. What it amounts to is not an actual standpipe but the location of the dump pump being located above the fuel outboards woulds leave 2100 pounds and inboards would leave 1800. Designed that way so you won't dump all the fuel. If you used the dump pumps to feed the engines you would wait for the pressure gauge to start dancing which indicated cavitation and you knew that no matter what
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