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Dave in WV

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Everything posted by Dave in WV

  1. Steve 1300 is correect. It's a different light assembly. The 250 knot lights started with the '88 H2's. When parts weren't available you had an entry to limit the particular landing light to 165 knots in the forms. apexlined, there are changes like this through the H2 production. It seemed every two years of production something was different. Not all H2's have the Rosemont pitot system. The engineers had to carry both sets of charts in case we flew on another units birds.
  2. I think putting the knob in 6N like everyone is taught is good enough and nothing else needs thought into it. You can turn the know counter clockwise with no ill effect as stated but when the out of sequence ogre rears it's ugly head you have to deal with the crew chief and he/she won't be happy.
  3. When they went to 3000 psi the brake assembly stayed the same. I know the '88 H2's have it (MC-130W's now) and the '79 H2's didn't.
  4. The USMC had WO pilots through the Korean war and a bit later. I was told CWO Wildfang had a Presidential waver to stay past 30 years. I know a couple of prior USMC load masters that flew with him and both said he was a great stick. One commented the best on instruments he had flown with.
  5. I wonder when these strange problems arise is one component is bad and is covered up by the corrections of a good component? Could they be cases of the pilots and FE thinking it's close enough until the problem can't be over looked? Not long after the 95% torque BS got started by the AF I had a H model have low torque on one engine but still met the 95% torque I posted. I called "reject low torque" and we rejected and cleared the runway. The pilots thought it was good to go since we had the 95% torque on the one engine and 100% on the other three. I stuck to my guns and maint. replaced the valve housing and fuel control to fix it. The flight before the same day did not have the problem. I never posted 95% torque again unless it was a check ride. If it's not a certified 95% engine by maintenance it is not legal to fly it that way.
  6. Dave in WV

    Old Times

    There's nothing like the sound of a T-56 engine.
  7. When we had E models we always turned the ATM off from before the pilot hit the starter switch to at least after he released it. There wasn't enough air from the GTC to start the engine and run the ATM.
  8. RZ, I knew you had to deal with it. Scotty Johnson told me. Thanks for the replies. RZ, stay in touch.
  9. Can anyone give me info as to what unit(s) these aircraft were assigned and the locations while in SEA and about how long they were in-country? I have prostate cancer (caught early enough to deal with) and it may sound like a reach connecting it to agent orange but if those birds were contaminated I worked on them from 75-80 as a CC and then from 81-85 as a FE. I'm thinking about filing a claim and even though I'll get turned down I have a paper trail started. I've been told if I was in-country to file a claim (I never went to SEA). There is no history of prostate cancer in my family on either side.
  10. RZ, how many wings did the planes have when you started? Didn't you and Don Green fly with Eddie Rickenbacker?
  11. 1784 still keepin' on. I can't remember which bird we we sent to the AR ANG that had the highest flying hours of any E. Every time a wing crack scare happened the engineers from WR AFB showed up at Charlie West when we had it.
  12. Now that Sen. Robert C. Byrd is gone the 130th's (Charlie West) days may be numbered. Two plane grabs were attempted and fought off. The AMP program never happened as planned so the AD needs C-130s.
  13. Skip, I never saw it done but I'm a believer it would happen.
  14. Any time you want to climb over the chocks.:eek: ;)
  15. I noticed vice-grips next to what I assume is the emergency hydraulic hand pump on the right side of the cockpit next to the floor.
  16. Did they ever get the smell of death out of those birds we sent to Little Rock? 1824 had a petrified snake under the cargo comp. floor when we got her in '75/76 from the AD. We replaced all of the cargo comp. insulation and it helped with the smell but there was still a faint smell in the summer after they were closed up. I spent some time getting those birds back into shape when I was a CC.
  17. Dave in WV

    New Eng!

    Congrats on completing your training. It's a great job. The learning never ends but that's part of the fun. Enjoy it to the fullest!
  18. Howard AFB, Panama was good until it became a TAC base. The food at Altus wasn't bad back in '82. Wright-Pat had decent chow for several years. Kef had really bad food in '02. The Navy must really like crapping on their troops.
  19. If you are talking about -15 engines the reduced power TIT is 970 unless it has been changed. 932 is -7 engine max continuous TIT for cruise. I can't give stats but I know at least 2 ANG units had H2s and flew them at 1010 all the time and they had more engine changes for tubines than the units that flew at 970. To do the reduced power for more turbine life the correct way is to chose an altitude you can get 280 TAS in an E model @ 900 TIT and 290 TAS in an H model @ 970 TIT but most units went for 300 TAS in the H models. As the speed increases you pull the power back to maintain the TAS.
  20. For the ANG it was a patch change. I remember being on a "Spanish Log" mission and riding the bus to quarters off base with a C-141 and C-5 crew. They all bought a beer a piece while we got a case for the crew. The "big MAC" boys were pissed about they way things were being handled by billeting. About halfway into the ride to Madrid I looked at the C-5 AC and said "man this is great ain't it?" He asked what so great about it and I told him we weren't just a C-130 crew, we were a Guard C-130 crew and they were getting hosed as much as we were. "Welcome to the world of "little MAC"".
  21. Tiny, I'm sorry for your loss. My condolences to you and your family.
  22. We were briefed the Evansville crash was caused by using full or almost full rudder deflection away from the simulated engine out while turning into the "dead engine" with the two engines on the outside of the turn pulling the plane around the turn and then the co-pilot centered the rudder. The aircraft turned violently around much like a top and went to a 90 degree bank angle if not greater and fell with almost no forward flight. We had it demonstrated in the simulator for a few years. The first time the plane went to about a 105 degree bank angle. It was a situational awareness failure and not flying at a safe airspeed above VMCA while turning into a simulated out engine.
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