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  1. 4 points
    Being very late in this conversation, I don't know if this has any bearing any longer, but as son of Lars I inherited printings for another forty or so copies of the very last issue (30th). They are now assembled and could be sent for the cost of post and package, just like my father did.
  2. 3 points
    This is my grandson Charlie in front of a new C-130J He said this is for Papaw!!
  3. 3 points
    On this day in 1954, marked the first flight of the C-130 Hercules! Some interesting history from Wikipedia: Background and requirements The Korean War showed that World War II-era piston-engine transports—Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcars, Douglas C-47 Skytrains and Curtiss C-46 Commandos—were no longer adequate. Thus, on 2 February 1951, the United States Air Force issued a General Operating Requirement (GOR) for a new transport to Boeing, Douglas, Fairchild, Lockheed, Martin, Chase Aircraft, North American, Northrop, and Airlifts Inc. The new transport would have a capacity of 92 passengers, 72 combat troops or 64 paratroopers in a cargo compartment that was approximately 41 feet (12 m) long, 9 feet (2.7 m) high, and 10 feet (3.0 m) wide. Unlike transports derived from passenger airliners, it was to be designed specifically as a combat transport with loading from a hinged loading ramp at the rear of the fuselage. A key feature was the introduction of the Allison T56 turboprop powerplant, which was developed for the C-130. At the time, the turboprop was a new application of gas turbines, which offered greater range at propeller-driven speeds compared to pure turbojets, which were faster but consumed more fuel. They also produced much more power for their weight than piston engines. Design phase The Hercules resembled a larger four-engine brother to the C-123 Provider with a similar wing and cargo ramp layout that evolved from the Chase XCG-20 Avitruc, which in turn, was first designed and flown as a cargo glider in 1947.[5] The Boeing C-97 Stratofreighter also had a rear ramp, which made it possible to drive vehicles onto the plane (also possible with forward ramp on a C-124). The ramp on the Hercules was also used to airdrop cargo, which included low-altitude extraction for Sheridan tanks and even dropping large improvised "daisy cutter" bombs. The new Lockheed cargo plane design possessed a range of 1,100 nmi (1,270 mi; 2,040 km), takeoff capability from short and unprepared strips, and the ability to fly with one engine shut down. Fairchild, North American, Martin, and Northrop declined to participate. The remaining five companies tendered a total of ten designs: Lockheed two, Boeing one, Chase three, Douglas three, and Airlifts Inc. one. The contest was a close affair between the lighter of the two Lockheed (preliminary project designation L-206) proposals and a four-turboprop Douglas design. The Lockheed design team was led by Willis Hawkins, starting with a 130-page proposal for the Lockheed L-206.[6]Hall Hibbard, Lockheed vice president and chief engineer, saw the proposal and directed it to Kelly Johnson, who did not care for the low-speed, unarmed aircraft, and remarked, "If you sign that letter, you will destroy the Lockheed Company."[6] Both Hibbard and Johnson signed the proposal and the company won the contract for the now-designated Model 82 on 2 July 1951.[7] The first flight of the YC-130 prototype was made on 23 August 1954 from the Lockheed plant in Burbank, California. The aircraft, serial number 53-3397, was the second prototype, but the first of the two to fly. The YC-130 was piloted by Stanley Beltz and Roy Wimmer on its 61-minute flight to Edwards Air Force Base; Jack Real and Dick Stanton served as flight engineers. Kelly Johnson flew chase in a Lockheed P2V Neptune.[8] After the two prototypes were completed, production began in Marietta, Georgia, where over 2,300 C-130s have been built through 2009.[9] The initial production model, the C-130A, was powered by Allison T56-A-9 turboprops with three-blade propellers and originally equipped with the blunt nose of the prototypes. Deliveries began in December 1956, continuing until the introduction of the C-130B model in 1959. Some A-models were equipped with skis and re-designated C-130D. As the C-130A became operational with Tactical Air Command (TAC), the C-130's lack of range became apparent and additional fuel capacity was added with wing pylon-mounted tanks outboard of the engines; this added 6,000 lb of fuel capacity for a total capacity of 40,000 lb.
  4. 2 points
    Staying in, doing honey -dos, cleaning out stuff. Good time to do spring cleaning. Can't do much else, can't go to the Air Museum to work. Better days ahead😄
  5. 2 points
    While CBs and fuses essentially "do" the same thing (limit current) the way they do it and the response to overcurrent are different. Generally, Fuses react faster than CBs to overcurrent situations. The component they (CB/Fuse) supply power to determines what type of protection they need. In this case the TQ and TIT Cbs feed 155VAC to power supplies/amplifiers while the fuses provide 26VAC to drive pressure transmitters and gauges without separate internal power supplies.
  6. 2 points
    I wish I had a nickle for every strap I ever tightened down. I even got three or four surplus straps to tie equipment down on my trailer. I do put the equipment CG just slightly forward of the tandem axle center, but no, I do not make out a Form F every time I load the trailer.
  7. 2 points
    Hope all of you have a nice Thanksgiving Day. And many more! Ken
  8. 2 points
    I have to agree with Ken, Hope all you Herc guys a happy Thanksgiving and many more! November 1968 Chow Hall in Monsoon weather Naha Okinawa the first of what my calender was telling me 2 more to goafter this one. Little did I know the next year and a half would be spent in places like Ubon, Soc Trang, Bien How, Pleiku, Phu Cat ! Would do it all over again just to hang with all the magnificent Band Of Brothers I met along the way! Feb 68 -Mar 09!
  9. 2 points
    Very Cool. All indications are that the C-130 will be around for many years to come. Maybe he will fly or maintain one in the future.
  10. 2 points
    If the orifice cups are clogged, you will never be able to accurately check servicing, as the pressurized sump may always show good, but at the expense of the atmospheric sump. The atmospheric sump is allegedly the most accurate location, so if it's inaccurate, it will always lie to you. You should check your tech data for how to clean the orifice cups. The only other option is to replace the pitchlock regulator, preferably with one that was recently overhauled to guarantee the cups are clean. One indication the orifice cups are clogged is that, when you check the pressurized sump after 2 minutes, the fluid fills up and overflows. This is due to the pitchlock regulator keeping the fluid pressurized in the system instead of draining the fluid into the barrel like it's supposed to. Be careful of those who tell you only the pressurized sump is required for an accurate fluid check. This comes from the idea that the pressurized sump dipstick actually gives you a quantity, and the atmospheric sump is only a go/no-go. The only thing the pressurized sump dipstick tells you is how much fluid is in the pressurized sump, who's job is to force-feed the pumps sending the fluid out to the valvehousing. The atmospheric sump dipstick tells you how much is in the barrel AND atmospheric sump. If there's nothing on the atmospheric dipstick, you have no idea how much is in the barrel, and that can be dangerous.
  11. 2 points
    The AC-130J's arrival in Afghanistan marks a historic changing of the guard as older AC-130Us have now finished their last scheduled deployment. By Joseph TrevithickJuly 10, 2019 The U.S. Air Force's new AC-130J Ghostriders have been flying combat missions in Afghanistan since June 2019. The gunships took over from AC-130U Spooky IIs that had been supporting U.S. and coalition special operations forces and their Afghan partners in that country. Those Spooky IIs have now returned to the United States, marking the last scheduled combat deployment ever for that version of the AC-130. Northwest Florida Daily News had been the first to report on June 28, 2019, that the AC-130J had flown its first-ever combat mission in Afghanistan. This detail had emerged during a change of command ceremony at Hurlburt Field in Florida, during which U.S. Air Force Lieutenant General James Slife took charge of Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) from Lieutenant General Brad Webb. The Ghostrider's first combat sortie had taken place "just days before," according to the story. "We are pleased to announce the AC-130J has deployed in support of combat operations overseas," U.S. Air Force Captain Keavy Rake, an AFSOC spokesperson, confirmed to The War Zone in an Email on July 10, 2019. "The first AC-130Js deployed in late June 2019 to relieve the AC-130Us, who arrived home to Hurlburt Field on 8 July 2019." The Air Force declared that the AC-130J had reached initial operational capability in late 2017, with the 73rd Special Operation Squadron at Hurlburt Field becoming the first operational unit to fly the aircraft in 2018. The 73rd is the squadron presently flying the Ghostriders over Afghanistan. AC-130Js had previously taken part in a number of exercises in the United States and abroad. We don't know much about the 73rd's initial deployment with the Ghostrider yet, but AFSOC's AC-130s most often fly at night, supporting special operations forces on the ground, either providing direct close air support or armed overwatch during their operations. U.S. special operators remain heavily engaged in Afghanistan, against the Taliban and a variety of other terrorist and militant groups, including an ISIS-linked faction that first emerged in 2015. In the past, AC-130s have also conducted targeted strikes against specific individuals in support of the secretive Joint Special Operations Command's task forces in the country. An AC-130U from the 4th Special Operations Squadron was also notably involved in the infamous mistaken strike against a Doctors Without Borders hospital in the Afghan city of Kunduz in 2015. A subsequent investigation revealed a number of equipment failures and human errors that led to the tragedy. The 4th SOS is the last squadron to fly the U-model, including the ones that just returned home this week. It will continue to keep some of those aircraft available for unscheduled contingency deployments until its full complement of AC-130Js has arrived, according to Military.com. The squadron received its first Ghostrider in March 2019. The last Ghostrider deliveries are scheduled to occur in 2021 and the Air Force plans to eventually have a fleet of 37 of the aircraft in total, which will replace all of the remaining AC-130Us and AC-130W Stinger II gunships. As of March 2019, AFSOC had already retired seven of the 10 remaining U models and three of the 12 W variants, according to Pentagon budget documents. The service already retired the last of the AC-130H Spectre gunships in 2016. The deployment of the AC-130Js and the end of scheduled combat operations for the AC-130Us very much marks a shift in AFSOC's gunship operations, as well. The Spooky IIs, which entered service in 1995, are the last of the Air Force's old school AC-130 gunships with a five-barrel 25mm GAU-12/U Gatling cannon, a single-barrel 40mm Bofors cannon, and a 105mm howitzer as their only armament. These aircraft were a direct evolution of the original Vietnam War-era AC-130s. By all indications, the AC-130Us are also the last platform of any kind in the U.S. military to use the 40mm Bofors gun, a World War II-era weapon, which proved to be a deadly aerial weapon, but also increasingly hard to operate and maintain. The Air Force had found itself scouring the world for spare parts in the early 2000s and rebuilding 40mm ammunition from the 1940s in recent years to keep the guns operational. Clemens Vasters via Wikimedia A close up of the 40mm Bofors cannon, at left, and its 105mm howitzer, at right on an AC-130H Spectre gunship. The AC-130U has a similar configuration. The AC-130J is a very different beast, though it does have the same 105mm howitzer as the AC-130U, as well as a smaller 30mm GAU-23/A Bushmaster cannon. But the Ghostrider, from the very beginning, was designed to also employ precision-guided munitions, including the AGM-114 Hellfire missile, the GBU-39/B Small Diameter Bomb (SDB), the GBU-44/B Viper Strike glide bomb, and the AGM-176 Griffin, which can function as a powered missile or as an unpowered glide bomb. The AC-130Ws, which are conversions of older C-130H cargo aircraft, have a virtually identical armament package. The Air Force had not even originally planned to install the 105mm howitzer on the AC-130J, or the AC-130W, but eventually changed course. AFSOC took delivery of the first Block 20 AC-130J with the howitzer in 2016. There had also been concerns about the functionality of the Ghostrider's 30mm GAU-23/A, but these issues have all since been resolved, according to the Pentagon's Office of the Director of Operational Test and Evaluation. The precision-guided munitions capability has really added a new dimension to the gunship's capabilities, giving it more stand-off reach and the ability to engage targets in multiple distinct areas simultaneously, something you can read about in more detail here. The addition of new weapons in the future, including the GBU-53/B Stormbreaker, previously known as the Small Diameter Bomb II, and the GBU-69/B Small Glide Munition, both of which have multi-mode guidance systems, will only increase the AC-130J's flexibility. With its 30mm and 105mm weapons, the Ghostriders can also still provide the same kind of extremely precise direct fire support as their predecessors. The AC-130Js are also packed with a variety of updated sensors, data links, communications systems, and more, and the Air Force is already in the process of further updating those systems. The latest Block 30 Ghostriders, which the 4th Special Operations Squadron began receiving in March, feature a number of improvements over the Block 20 aircraft that the 73rd Special Operations Squadron is flying in Afghanistan now. This includes upgraded sensor turrets with higher fidelity electro-optical and infrared full-motion video cameras and a new, large broadband satellite communications "hump" on top of the forward fuselage. The Air Force is looking to improve the survivability of all of its remaining gunships against newly emerging threats, such as GPS jamming, too. In 2018, U.S. Army General Raymond Thomas, then head of U.S. Special Operations Command, said that unspecified opponents – most likely Russian or Russian-backed forces – were using electronic warfare attacks against gunships operating over Syria. Entirely new capabilities might find their way onto the Ghostriders as time goes on, too. AFSOC is planning to demonstrate a high-energy laser weapon on one of its AC-130Js in 2022. But with no more AC-130U deployments on the schedule and AC-130Js now flying combat missions, the Air Force has already entered a new era of gunship operations.
  12. 2 points
    Is this guy reminiscing about engine runs?
  13. 2 points
    Hercinherit, I have a hand written letter signed by your dad that he sent along with an unbound 30th edition, which I had bound. If you would like the letter just PM me your address to this website. I thought a lot of Lars and how much he meant to the C-130 community. RIP Lars. Bill
  14. 2 points
    What is everyone doing this memorial day I will be doing a honor guard at Macon Memorial Park. Macon Ga.!! We have to honor are fallen who gave their all!!
  15. 2 points
  16. 2 points
    You're welcome. I retire 1 Oct. I certainly miss Bob he was a good friend and a member of the C-130 community. --Casey
  17. 2 points
    The forum will not allow me to post the news clipping pages. You can find the news clippings from the Doc Jensen Story at : http://www.tanwater.com/834/det1-pg4.html And http://www.tanwater.com/834/det1-pg5.html I can testify to the fact that every plane over An Loc came back with bullet holes. I was there. Saved these news clippings from the Det 1 Report. These 2 pages were on Doc Jensen story. Other news clippings I saved are at - http://www.tanwater.com/834/dex2.html#line3
  18. 2 points
    I flew with an old A-model captain when I was an FE with Transafrik in Angola. He enjoyed telling the story of departing somewhere in the very cold icy north. The funny thing is that he departed with the parking brake set and when he landed at Pope AFB (I think), he blew all 4 mains! Before you ask about the anti-skid light, I also asked that question. He said the early A-models had no anti-skid inoperative light. Some of you old heads may remember Bonzo Von Haven -- a legend in the Herc world. Don R.
  19. 1 point
    Doing well for now but the craziness is ramping.
  20. 1 point
    Doing fine. Faced a lot worse odds a lot more times and survived.
  21. 1 point
    I remember being in awe of you Loadmasters hustling around all over the cargo compartment putting on and tightening straps while I was thinking I was helping you while trying to make one strap work! I got better as time went on, but I learned to stay out of your way when in-country and time was of essence! I have been wanting to say that for a long time! Ken
  22. 1 point
    It was Christmas and the judge was in a benevolent mood as he questioned the prisoner. "What are you charged with?" he asked. "Doing my Christmas shopping early," replied the defendant. "That's no offense," replied the judge. "How early were you doing this shopping?" "Before the store opened," countered the prisoner.
  23. 1 point
    I remember when that happened. By that time I was at CCK but I think I was on a CRB input when I heard about it. It brings back old memories doesn't it? Makes me remember the 40 missions I was on the year before at that same month, and not even worrying about one of those 37's or 57's ever hitting us. Almost nightly. Being young and dumb helped though.😀 That old bird lived a long time and flew a lot of miles/hours before that night though. Ken
  24. 1 point
  25. 1 point
    The racehorse owner was annoyed with the running of his horse at the race. He turned on the jockey. "Flaherty, could you not have raced faster?" "Sure I could have, but you know we are supposed to stay on the horse."
  26. 1 point
    Hi Larry, good to hear you are doing pretty well. Lots of guys our age aren't. Keep posting and good health on ya , friend.✈️
  27. 1 point
    Yes. The problem has been solved. We applied sealant to tank #2 and allowed it to cure very well. Now, there is no more leak and the aircraft is back in service.
  28. 1 point
    Thanks Metalbasher☺️
  29. 1 point
    Murphy, a furniture dealer from Dublin, decided to expand the line of furniture in his store, so he decided to go to Paris to see what he could find. After arriving in Paris, he visited with some manufacturers and selected a line that he thought would sell well back home. To celebrate the new acquisition, he decided to visit a small bistro and have a glass of wine. As he sat enjoying his wine, he noticed that the small place was quite crowded, and that the other chair at his table was the only vacant seat in the house. Before long, a very beautiful young Parisian girl came to his table, asked him something in French (which Murphy could not understand), so he motioned to the vacant chair and invited her to sit down. He tried to speak to her in English, but she did not speak his language. After a couple of minutes of trying to communicate with her, he took a napkin and drew a picture of a wine glass and showed it to her. She nodded, so he ordered a glass of wine for her. After sitting together at the table for a while, he took another napkin, and drew a picture of a plate with food on it, and she nodded. They left the bistro and found a quiet cafe that featured a small group playing romantic music. They ordered dinner, after which he took another napkin and drew a picture of a couple dancing. She nodded, and they got up to dance. They danced until the cafe closed and the band was packing up. Back at their table, the young lady took a napkin and drew a picture of a four-poster bed. To this day, Murphy has no idea how she figured out he was in the furniture business
  30. 1 point
    Sonny I have a copy of the paper and will somehow get it to you!
  31. 1 point
    Right back at ya!!!!
  32. 1 point
    Lockheed Martin Delivers First HC-130J Combat King II to New York Air National Guard 106th Rescue Wing Recapitalizing Legacy HC-130 Fleet With Four HC-130Js The first HC-130J Commando II assigned to the N.Y. Air National Guard’s 106th Rescue Wing departs Lockheed Martin’s facility in Marietta, Georgia, where all C-130s are built. (Lockheed Martin photo by Todd R. McQueen) "The HC-130 Hercules aircraft has been an essential part of the 106th’s Rescue Wing’s fleet for many decades, supporting these brave Airmen in meeting their mission requirements time and time again.” -Ray Burick MARIETTA, Ga., March 21, 2019 – Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) delivered the first of four HC-130J Combat King II aircraft today to representatives from the New York Air National Guard’s 106th Rescue Wing (RQW). This HC-130J will be operated by the 102nd Rescue Squadron (RQS) at Francis S. Grabreski Air National Guard Base, New York. The 102nd RQS, which is part of the 106th Rescue Wing (RQW), currently operates a legacy fleet of HC-130P/N variant Combat King I aircraft, which will be replaced by four new HC-130Js. The squadron will use its HC-130Js to refuel the New York Air National Guard’s 101st RQS HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters, which were manufactured by Lockheed Martin’s Sikorsky business in Stratford, Connecticut. Like others in the U.S. Air Force Rescue community, the 106th RQW lives by the motto, "That Others May Live," which reflects its mission of supporting combat search and rescue anywhere in the world. Crews from the 106th RQW rely on HC-130s to extend the range of combat search and rescue helicopters by providing air refueling in hostile or contested airspace. Other mission capabilities include performing tactical delivery of pararescue teams, small bundles, zodiac watercraft or four-wheel drive all-terrain vehicles; and providing direct assistance to survivors in advance of a recovery vehicle. "The HC-130 Hercules aircraft has been an essential part of the 106th’s Rescue Wing’s fleet for many decades, supporting these brave Airmen in meeting their mission requirements time and time again,” said Ray Burick, vice president of Domestic Programs for Lockheed Martin’s Air Mobility & Maritime Missions line of business. “The Lockheed Martin team is proud to provide the N.Y. Air National Guard with new HC-130Js that deliver increased power, capability and performance to support their crews in doing what they do best: saving lives and protecting the people they serve.” The HC-130J is the only dedicated fixed-wing personnel recovery platform in the Air Force and Air National Guard. The HC-130J supports missions in adverse weather and geographic environments, including reaching austere locations. The HC-130J is also tasked for airdrop, airland, and helicopter air-to-air refueling and forward-area ground refueling missions. It also supports humanitarian aid operations, disaster response, security cooperation/aviation advisory, emergency aeromedical evacuation and noncombatant evacuation operations. The HC-130J is one of eight production variants of the C-130J Super Hercules, the current production model of the legendary C-130 Hercules aircraft. With 400+ aircraft delivered, the C-130J is the airlifter of choice for 20 nations. The global Super Hercules fleet has more than 1.9 million flight hours of experience supporting almost any mission requirement — any time, any place. The U.S. government operates the largest C-130J Super Hercules fleet in the world. This delivery continues the U.S. government's transition to the C-130J as the common platform across Air Mobility Command, Air Force Special Operations Command, Air Combat Command, U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Marine Corps. The Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve Command currently operate a mixed fleet of C-130J and older Hercules aircraft. Source: https://news.lockheedmartin.com/2019-03-21-Lockheed-Martin-Delivers-First-HC-130J-Combat-King-II-to-New-York-Air-National-Guard
  33. 1 point
  34. 1 point
    A Telephone Salesman telephoned a household, and a four-year-old boy answered. The conversation went thus: Salesman: May I speak to your mother? Boy: She's not here. Salesman: Well, is anyone else there? Boy: My sister. Salesman: O.K., fine. May I speak to her? Boy: I guess so. At this point there was a very long silence on the phone. Then: Boy: Hello? Salesman: It's you. I thought you were going to call your sister. Boy: I did. But I can't get her out of the playpen
  35. 1 point
    That's exactly what I was looking for Mr N1dp. DC Selsyn. Thanks for the link!
  36. 1 point
    A large woman, wearing a sleeveless sun dress, walked into a bar in London. She raised her right arm, revealing a huge, hairy armpit as she pointed to all the people sitting at the bar and asked, What man here will buy a lady a drink? The bar went silent as the patrons tried to ignore her. But down at the end of the bar, an owly-eyed drunk slammed his hand down on the counter and bellowed, Give the ballerina a drink! The bartender poured the drink and the woman chugged it down. She turned to the patrons and again pointed around at all of them, revealing the same hairy armpit, and asked, What man here will buy a lady a drink? Once again, the same little drunk slapped his money down on the bar and said, Give the ballerina another drink! The bartender approached the little drunk and said, I say, old chap, it's your business if you want to buy the lady a drink, but why do you keep calling her the ballerina? As far as I'm concerned, the drunk replied, any woman who can lift her leg that high has got to be a ballerina!
  37. 1 point
    A woman was having a passionate affair with an inspector from a pest-control company. One afternoon they were carrying on in the bedroom together when her husband arrived home unexpectedly. "Quick," said the woman to her lover, "into the closet!" and she pushed him in the closet, stark naked. The husband, however, became suspicious and after a search of the bedroom discovered the man in the closet. "Who are you?" he asked. "I'm an inspector from Termite Busters," said the exterminator. "What are you doing in there?" the husband asked. "I'm investigating a complaint about an infestation of moths," the man replied. "And where are your clothes?" asked the husband. The man looked down at himself and said, "Those little bastards."
  38. 1 point
    Search "Surfin' South Sudan" on YouTube. That's how they do it in the commercial world. That reporter would've gone nuts over that! Don R.
  39. 1 point
  40. 1 point
    I don't have enough info at my fingertips to give a firm yes, I wish I did. It looks good, but have you contacted FMS at WRALC?
  41. 1 point
    Hi guys, pls what could be the possible cause of an engine failing to air start. we followed all the procedures ranging from cruise engine shutdown, NTS check, and getting to air start the engine refused to start. Actually what happens is that during air start, the engine rotates to about 7% RPM and starts winding back Down. I need some helpful info pls.
  42. 1 point
    Heard the other day that YMC-130H # 74-1686 (c/n 4669) located at Robins has had a museum express interest in acquiring the aircraft for a museum display. No word on the specific museum; just good to see something happen to it besides sitting in the elements and being used for battle damage repair practice.
  43. 1 point
    At the police station, Bubba explained to the police officer why his cousins shot him. "Well," Bubba began, "We wuz havin' a good time drinking, when my cousin Ray picked up his shotgun and said, 'Hey, der ya fellows wanna go hunting?'" "And then what happened?" the officer interrupted. "From what I remember," Bubba said, "I stood up and said, 'Sure, I'm game.'"
  44. 1 point
    An elderly pair (he a widower, she a widow) meet in a retirement village. They seem to hit it off; they share each others values, enjoy the same jokes, and find pleasure in each others company. After a few months, the widower asks for the hand of the widow in marriage. She appears hesitant and decided to probe her soon-to-be a little. "Perhaps I shouldn't look a gift horse in the mouth, but... How's your health?" "It's OK", he answers. "I'm not getting any younger, but I don't have any major health problems. I can still enjoy life". "Well, then", she replies "I don't want to be a snoop, but I've got to protect myself: how are you fixed financially?" "So-so. I'm not rich, but I'm comfortable. You don't have to worry about me sponging off you; I can support myself". The little old lady blushes, and finally asks her swain - "And how's your sex life...." "Infrequently", he declares. The widow ponders this for a moment or so, before asking... "And is that one word or two?
  45. 1 point
    When I go to casinos, the most ridiculous sign I see is the one that says: "If you have a gambling problem, call 1-800-GAMBLER." I thought about it for a moment and dialed the number. When they answered I said, "I have an ace and a six. The dealer has a seven. What do I do?"
  46. 1 point
    Yep, Larry, that was my first thought -- a flying crch, but all the B-66's at Korat took off and landed back at the same base. Also, these planes were flying over North Vietnam. Don't think they'd allow a crew chief to tag along. When you mentioned your duties as an A/3C, you omitted the wash rack. Spent a lot of time washing the bellies of a lot of B-models. Don R.
  47. 1 point
    We recover the problem by replacing the anti skid valve....it was found faulty during before taxi check
  48. 1 point
    Assuming you performed fault isolation and normal operational checks, Check back pressure of brake system (should be under 70 PSI at each wheel, if one brake reads 10 psi or more higher, look farther) , check minimum brake pressure (should be over 1700 psi and max around 2030 and should be equal between left and right under same pedal pressure), check electrical grounds for anti-skid control valves (ensure they are tight and not corroded), check anti-skid control valve filters (if dirty, replace), check brakes for ability to return (watch pressure plate return after pressure release, should return equally), check tranducers for smooth operation and check voltage output with drill. If you find nothing, replace parts in this order. 1. anti-skid control box. 2. anti-skid control valve. 3. transducer Without being there and being able to look at it, this is about best I can offer. Tons of things that could cause this but most involve electrical signal between transducer/box/valve.
  49. 1 point
    The Plan In the beginning was the Plan. And then came the Assumptions. And the Assumptions were without form. And the Plan was without substance. And darkness was upon the face of the Workers. And they spoke among themselves, saying, "It is a crock of s%@#, and it stinks." And the Workers went unto their Supervisors and said, "It is a pail of dung, and we can't live with the smell. And the Supervisors went unto their Managers, saying, "It is the container of the excrements, and it is very strong, such that none may abide by it." And the Mangers went unto their Directors, saying, "It is a vessel of fertilizer, and none may abide its strength." And the Directors spoke among themselves, saying to one another, "It promotes growth, and it is very powerful." And the Vice Presidents went to the President, saying unto him, "This new plan will actively promote the growth and vigor of the company with very powerful effects." And the President looked upon the Plan and saw that it was good. And the Plan became Policy. And that is how s%@# happens.
  50. 1 point
    I'm assuming a BARV is a Bleed Air Regulator Valve, and when you say "accompanied of TIT", you mean TIT dropped with torque, and not increased. The TD Amp's job is not to maintain power, but to maintain temperature based on the throttle setting. If the TIT is low while the TD Amp is in AUTO, then there is an error with a signal being supplied to the TD Amp, or there is an error with the Amp itself, a setting or malfunction, When you lose air, you lose power for two reasons. Jet engines love more air, both to increase power through expansion, and also to keep the combustion chamber cool. If you lose air, you lose power immediately since there is less air to expand, but also the loss of cooling air causes an increase in TIT, and results in the TD Amp to pull fuel back. This all produces a loss of torque and fuel flow while maintaining TIT. I cannot emphasize this enough, before doing anything, ensure your indications are accurate! TIT to within 6 degrees of actual as measured with a test set and all thermocouples verified good and connected properly. Torque indicator recalibrated and set to within 50 in-lbs of actual. Swap the Fuel Flow gauge with a known good one for good measure, then reverify the problem. Why the engine goes to normal when the Regulator Valve gets turned off is interesting. If the TIT was to remain normal, I would say the Regulator Valve was mis-tuned and the TD Amp was doing its job. Since the TIT is also low, we know the TD Amp is not doing its job (above crossover only). Even if the Regulator was malfunctioning, the TD Amp is definitely having an issue. The fact that the valve affects the TD System operation means they may be connected electrically in some way, like the power/signal wires may be chafing together. If the fuel control was perfectly tuned and we suspected the TD Amp was just inop, we would see high TIT with bleed air open, not low TIT. To check if it is an electrical problem, check power going to the TD Amp using a TD Amp Test Set, then cycle the bleed air valve and see if the power at the Amp changes. There are two types of power going to the Amp, so check them both. If I misunderstood you, and the TIT is high during the malfunction, and not low, then you have a TD Amp malfunction AND a bleed air regulating valve balance issue causing you to lose 2500 in-lbs.
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