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  1. 4 points
    Being very late in this conversation, I don't know if this has any bearing any longer, but as son of Lars I inherited printings for another forty or so copies of the very last issue (30th). They are now assembled and could be sent for the cost of post and package, just like my father did.
  2. 3 points
    Hanging in here, much like everyone else. Beginning to show signs of cabin fever. And bored like other guys here. Have been to the supermarket twice, and over my wife's objection, took my car to the shop. We're following the rules to the letter. Took the worst ass chewing ever from my wife for failing to maintain personal distance. 😡 Think she would have made a great TI.
  3. 3 points
    Doing house stuff, building up the 302 for my Ranchero.
  4. 3 points
    This is my grandson Charlie in front of a new C-130J He said this is for Papaw!!
  5. 3 points
    On this day in 1954, marked the first flight of the C-130 Hercules! Some interesting history from Wikipedia: Background and requirements The Korean War showed that World War II-era piston-engine transports—Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcars, Douglas C-47 Skytrains and Curtiss C-46 Commandos—were no longer adequate. Thus, on 2 February 1951, the United States Air Force issued a General Operating Requirement (GOR) for a new transport to Boeing, Douglas, Fairchild, Lockheed, Martin, Chase Aircraft, North American, Northrop, and Airlifts Inc. The new transport would have a capacity of 92 passengers, 72 combat troops or 64 paratroopers in a cargo compartment that was approximately 41 feet (12 m) long, 9 feet (2.7 m) high, and 10 feet (3.0 m) wide. Unlike transports derived from passenger airliners, it was to be designed specifically as a combat transport with loading from a hinged loading ramp at the rear of the fuselage. A key feature was the introduction of the Allison T56 turboprop powerplant, which was developed for the C-130. At the time, the turboprop was a new application of gas turbines, which offered greater range at propeller-driven speeds compared to pure turbojets, which were faster but consumed more fuel. They also produced much more power for their weight than piston engines. Design phase The Hercules resembled a larger four-engine brother to the C-123 Provider with a similar wing and cargo ramp layout that evolved from the Chase XCG-20 Avitruc, which in turn, was first designed and flown as a cargo glider in 1947.[5] The Boeing C-97 Stratofreighter also had a rear ramp, which made it possible to drive vehicles onto the plane (also possible with forward ramp on a C-124). The ramp on the Hercules was also used to airdrop cargo, which included low-altitude extraction for Sheridan tanks and even dropping large improvised "daisy cutter" bombs. The new Lockheed cargo plane design possessed a range of 1,100 nmi (1,270 mi; 2,040 km), takeoff capability from short and unprepared strips, and the ability to fly with one engine shut down. Fairchild, North American, Martin, and Northrop declined to participate. The remaining five companies tendered a total of ten designs: Lockheed two, Boeing one, Chase three, Douglas three, and Airlifts Inc. one. The contest was a close affair between the lighter of the two Lockheed (preliminary project designation L-206) proposals and a four-turboprop Douglas design. The Lockheed design team was led by Willis Hawkins, starting with a 130-page proposal for the Lockheed L-206.[6]Hall Hibbard, Lockheed vice president and chief engineer, saw the proposal and directed it to Kelly Johnson, who did not care for the low-speed, unarmed aircraft, and remarked, "If you sign that letter, you will destroy the Lockheed Company."[6] Both Hibbard and Johnson signed the proposal and the company won the contract for the now-designated Model 82 on 2 July 1951.[7] The first flight of the YC-130 prototype was made on 23 August 1954 from the Lockheed plant in Burbank, California. The aircraft, serial number 53-3397, was the second prototype, but the first of the two to fly. The YC-130 was piloted by Stanley Beltz and Roy Wimmer on its 61-minute flight to Edwards Air Force Base; Jack Real and Dick Stanton served as flight engineers. Kelly Johnson flew chase in a Lockheed P2V Neptune.[8] After the two prototypes were completed, production began in Marietta, Georgia, where over 2,300 C-130s have been built through 2009.[9] The initial production model, the C-130A, was powered by Allison T56-A-9 turboprops with three-blade propellers and originally equipped with the blunt nose of the prototypes. Deliveries began in December 1956, continuing until the introduction of the C-130B model in 1959. Some A-models were equipped with skis and re-designated C-130D. As the C-130A became operational with Tactical Air Command (TAC), the C-130's lack of range became apparent and additional fuel capacity was added with wing pylon-mounted tanks outboard of the engines; this added 6,000 lb of fuel capacity for a total capacity of 40,000 lb.
  6. 2 points
    Excel file I made some time ago, performance accurate to about 0.2% most of the time. Perf PPC v2.1.xlsx
  7. 2 points
    Lost my uncle, Pfc Lewis Radcliffe on June 17, 1944 KIA during this invasion. Was able to visit Normandy in 1995 and find his grave which no family member had ever visited. I was there with my C-130 unit to honor D Day and ten of my maint. troops went with me to his grave. They were all in uniform and in formation and we had a ceremony where we refolded his flag over his grave. Very sober moment. Bill
  8. 2 points
    Its so you can check your hair and your shades before stepping out the crew entrance door.
  9. 2 points
    Just found this while messing around on computer. Since I was one of the loadmasters I want to say these are four of the most wonderful guys that I'm proud to call them my "Brothers" Ralph Bemis.
  10. 2 points
    Back to work yesterday, all is still well in the land of sand. People obeying the curfew, and while the infection rate may be troubling, situation is under control. Government doing a sterling job of getting a handle on the virus, getting free medical treatment for all, online distance learning for schools, partial salaries guarenteed for companies that had to close.
  11. 2 points
    Staying in, doing honey -dos, cleaning out stuff. Good time to do spring cleaning. Can't do much else, can't go to the Air Museum to work. Better days ahead😄
  12. 2 points
    Hello: That design of the door is because of the space the wheel need to go up and down without get stuck. If you go to the emergency and abnormal procedures section of the flight manual, Main Landing gear Extension After Normal and Emergency System Failure, one note say this: Extend the Aft strut firt. The main landing gear doors are opened by a mechanical connection to the aft strut, and damage to the doors could result if the forward strut is extended firt. If the door don't have that shape the wheel would get stuck.
  13. 2 points
    While CBs and fuses essentially "do" the same thing (limit current) the way they do it and the response to overcurrent are different. Generally, Fuses react faster than CBs to overcurrent situations. The component they (CB/Fuse) supply power to determines what type of protection they need. In this case the TQ and TIT Cbs feed 155VAC to power supplies/amplifiers while the fuses provide 26VAC to drive pressure transmitters and gauges without separate internal power supplies.
  14. 2 points
    I remember being in awe of you Loadmasters hustling around all over the cargo compartment putting on and tightening straps while I was thinking I was helping you while trying to make one strap work! I got better as time went on, but I learned to stay out of your way when in-country and time was of essence! I have been wanting to say that for a long time! Ken
  15. 2 points
    I wish I had a nickle for every strap I ever tightened down. I even got three or four surplus straps to tie equipment down on my trailer. I do put the equipment CG just slightly forward of the tandem axle center, but no, I do not make out a Form F every time I load the trailer.
  16. 2 points
    Hope all of you have a nice Thanksgiving Day. And many more! Ken
  17. 2 points
    I have to agree with Ken, Hope all you Herc guys a happy Thanksgiving and many more! November 1968 Chow Hall in Monsoon weather Naha Okinawa the first of what my calender was telling me 2 more to goafter this one. Little did I know the next year and a half would be spent in places like Ubon, Soc Trang, Bien How, Pleiku, Phu Cat ! Would do it all over again just to hang with all the magnificent Band Of Brothers I met along the way! Feb 68 -Mar 09!
  18. 2 points
    Very Cool. All indications are that the C-130 will be around for many years to come. Maybe he will fly or maintain one in the future.
  19. 2 points
    If the orifice cups are clogged, you will never be able to accurately check servicing, as the pressurized sump may always show good, but at the expense of the atmospheric sump. The atmospheric sump is allegedly the most accurate location, so if it's inaccurate, it will always lie to you. You should check your tech data for how to clean the orifice cups. The only other option is to replace the pitchlock regulator, preferably with one that was recently overhauled to guarantee the cups are clean. One indication the orifice cups are clogged is that, when you check the pressurized sump after 2 minutes, the fluid fills up and overflows. This is due to the pitchlock regulator keeping the fluid pressurized in the system instead of draining the fluid into the barrel like it's supposed to. Be careful of those who tell you only the pressurized sump is required for an accurate fluid check. This comes from the idea that the pressurized sump dipstick actually gives you a quantity, and the atmospheric sump is only a go/no-go. The only thing the pressurized sump dipstick tells you is how much fluid is in the pressurized sump, who's job is to force-feed the pumps sending the fluid out to the valvehousing. The atmospheric sump dipstick tells you how much is in the barrel AND atmospheric sump. If there's nothing on the atmospheric dipstick, you have no idea how much is in the barrel, and that can be dangerous.
  20. 2 points
    The AC-130J's arrival in Afghanistan marks a historic changing of the guard as older AC-130Us have now finished their last scheduled deployment. By Joseph TrevithickJuly 10, 2019 The U.S. Air Force's new AC-130J Ghostriders have been flying combat missions in Afghanistan since June 2019. The gunships took over from AC-130U Spooky IIs that had been supporting U.S. and coalition special operations forces and their Afghan partners in that country. Those Spooky IIs have now returned to the United States, marking the last scheduled combat deployment ever for that version of the AC-130. Northwest Florida Daily News had been the first to report on June 28, 2019, that the AC-130J had flown its first-ever combat mission in Afghanistan. This detail had emerged during a change of command ceremony at Hurlburt Field in Florida, during which U.S. Air Force Lieutenant General James Slife took charge of Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) from Lieutenant General Brad Webb. The Ghostrider's first combat sortie had taken place "just days before," according to the story. "We are pleased to announce the AC-130J has deployed in support of combat operations overseas," U.S. Air Force Captain Keavy Rake, an AFSOC spokesperson, confirmed to The War Zone in an Email on July 10, 2019. "The first AC-130Js deployed in late June 2019 to relieve the AC-130Us, who arrived home to Hurlburt Field on 8 July 2019." The Air Force declared that the AC-130J had reached initial operational capability in late 2017, with the 73rd Special Operation Squadron at Hurlburt Field becoming the first operational unit to fly the aircraft in 2018. The 73rd is the squadron presently flying the Ghostriders over Afghanistan. AC-130Js had previously taken part in a number of exercises in the United States and abroad. We don't know much about the 73rd's initial deployment with the Ghostrider yet, but AFSOC's AC-130s most often fly at night, supporting special operations forces on the ground, either providing direct close air support or armed overwatch during their operations. U.S. special operators remain heavily engaged in Afghanistan, against the Taliban and a variety of other terrorist and militant groups, including an ISIS-linked faction that first emerged in 2015. In the past, AC-130s have also conducted targeted strikes against specific individuals in support of the secretive Joint Special Operations Command's task forces in the country. An AC-130U from the 4th Special Operations Squadron was also notably involved in the infamous mistaken strike against a Doctors Without Borders hospital in the Afghan city of Kunduz in 2015. A subsequent investigation revealed a number of equipment failures and human errors that led to the tragedy. The 4th SOS is the last squadron to fly the U-model, including the ones that just returned home this week. It will continue to keep some of those aircraft available for unscheduled contingency deployments until its full complement of AC-130Js has arrived, according to Military.com. The squadron received its first Ghostrider in March 2019. The last Ghostrider deliveries are scheduled to occur in 2021 and the Air Force plans to eventually have a fleet of 37 of the aircraft in total, which will replace all of the remaining AC-130Us and AC-130W Stinger II gunships. As of March 2019, AFSOC had already retired seven of the 10 remaining U models and three of the 12 W variants, according to Pentagon budget documents. The service already retired the last of the AC-130H Spectre gunships in 2016. The deployment of the AC-130Js and the end of scheduled combat operations for the AC-130Us very much marks a shift in AFSOC's gunship operations, as well. The Spooky IIs, which entered service in 1995, are the last of the Air Force's old school AC-130 gunships with a five-barrel 25mm GAU-12/U Gatling cannon, a single-barrel 40mm Bofors cannon, and a 105mm howitzer as their only armament. These aircraft were a direct evolution of the original Vietnam War-era AC-130s. By all indications, the AC-130Us are also the last platform of any kind in the U.S. military to use the 40mm Bofors gun, a World War II-era weapon, which proved to be a deadly aerial weapon, but also increasingly hard to operate and maintain. The Air Force had found itself scouring the world for spare parts in the early 2000s and rebuilding 40mm ammunition from the 1940s in recent years to keep the guns operational. Clemens Vasters via Wikimedia A close up of the 40mm Bofors cannon, at left, and its 105mm howitzer, at right on an AC-130H Spectre gunship. The AC-130U has a similar configuration. The AC-130J is a very different beast, though it does have the same 105mm howitzer as the AC-130U, as well as a smaller 30mm GAU-23/A Bushmaster cannon. But the Ghostrider, from the very beginning, was designed to also employ precision-guided munitions, including the AGM-114 Hellfire missile, the GBU-39/B Small Diameter Bomb (SDB), the GBU-44/B Viper Strike glide bomb, and the AGM-176 Griffin, which can function as a powered missile or as an unpowered glide bomb. The AC-130Ws, which are conversions of older C-130H cargo aircraft, have a virtually identical armament package. The Air Force had not even originally planned to install the 105mm howitzer on the AC-130J, or the AC-130W, but eventually changed course. AFSOC took delivery of the first Block 20 AC-130J with the howitzer in 2016. There had also been concerns about the functionality of the Ghostrider's 30mm GAU-23/A, but these issues have all since been resolved, according to the Pentagon's Office of the Director of Operational Test and Evaluation. The precision-guided munitions capability has really added a new dimension to the gunship's capabilities, giving it more stand-off reach and the ability to engage targets in multiple distinct areas simultaneously, something you can read about in more detail here. The addition of new weapons in the future, including the GBU-53/B Stormbreaker, previously known as the Small Diameter Bomb II, and the GBU-69/B Small Glide Munition, both of which have multi-mode guidance systems, will only increase the AC-130J's flexibility. With its 30mm and 105mm weapons, the Ghostriders can also still provide the same kind of extremely precise direct fire support as their predecessors. The AC-130Js are also packed with a variety of updated sensors, data links, communications systems, and more, and the Air Force is already in the process of further updating those systems. The latest Block 30 Ghostriders, which the 4th Special Operations Squadron began receiving in March, feature a number of improvements over the Block 20 aircraft that the 73rd Special Operations Squadron is flying in Afghanistan now. This includes upgraded sensor turrets with higher fidelity electro-optical and infrared full-motion video cameras and a new, large broadband satellite communications "hump" on top of the forward fuselage. The Air Force is looking to improve the survivability of all of its remaining gunships against newly emerging threats, such as GPS jamming, too. In 2018, U.S. Army General Raymond Thomas, then head of U.S. Special Operations Command, said that unspecified opponents – most likely Russian or Russian-backed forces – were using electronic warfare attacks against gunships operating over Syria. Entirely new capabilities might find their way onto the Ghostriders as time goes on, too. AFSOC is planning to demonstrate a high-energy laser weapon on one of its AC-130Js in 2022. But with no more AC-130U deployments on the schedule and AC-130Js now flying combat missions, the Air Force has already entered a new era of gunship operations.
  21. 2 points
    Is this guy reminiscing about engine runs?
  22. 2 points
    Hercinherit, I have a hand written letter signed by your dad that he sent along with an unbound 30th edition, which I had bound. If you would like the letter just PM me your address to this website. I thought a lot of Lars and how much he meant to the C-130 community. RIP Lars. Bill
  23. 2 points
    What is everyone doing this memorial day I will be doing a honor guard at Macon Memorial Park. Macon Ga.!! We have to honor are fallen who gave their all!!
  24. 2 points
    This is correction of TIT 15 to 60 °c not a cut back its miss consecpt.as per 1c-130B-2-4CL-1. But new JG 1c-130H-2-71JG-00-1 having no 15 to 60°c limit its only 800 to 840 limit of cross over TIT no correction mentioned here.
  25. 2 points
  26. 2 points
    You're welcome. I retire 1 Oct. I certainly miss Bob he was a good friend and a member of the C-130 community. --Casey
  27. 2 points
    The forum will not allow me to post the news clipping pages. You can find the news clippings from the Doc Jensen Story at : http://www.tanwater.com/834/det1-pg4.html And http://www.tanwater.com/834/det1-pg5.html I can testify to the fact that every plane over An Loc came back with bullet holes. I was there. Saved these news clippings from the Det 1 Report. These 2 pages were on Doc Jensen story. Other news clippings I saved are at - http://www.tanwater.com/834/dex2.html#line3
  28. 2 points
    I flew with an old A-model captain when I was an FE with Transafrik in Angola. He enjoyed telling the story of departing somewhere in the very cold icy north. The funny thing is that he departed with the parking brake set and when he landed at Pope AFB (I think), he blew all 4 mains! Before you ask about the anti-skid light, I also asked that question. He said the early A-models had no anti-skid inoperative light. Some of you old heads may remember Bonzo Von Haven -- a legend in the Herc world. Don R.
  29. 1 point
    Well done Spectre!
  30. 1 point
    I agree. Think it's a "safe for flight" mirror
  31. 1 point
    What's the difference between girls aged: 8, 18, 28, 38, 48, 58, 68 and 78? At 8 - You take her to bed and tell her a story. At 18 - You tell her a story and take her to bed. At 28 - You don't need to tell her a story to take her to bed. At 38 - She tells you a story and takes you to bed. At 48 - You tell her a story to avoid going to bed. At 58 - You stay in bed to avoid her story. At 68 - If you take her to bed, that'll be a story. At 78 - You can get out of bed, that's another story.
  32. 1 point
  33. 1 point
    Yes. The problem has been solved. We applied sealant to tank #2 and allowed it to cure very well. Now, there is no more leak and the aircraft is back in service.
  34. 1 point
    I don't remember where I saw this, but it's interesting. Displayed at the USAF Museum. Check out the rank of the first FE.
  35. 1 point
    The Brothel: A man was walking one day, when he came to this big house in a nice neighborhood. Suddenly he realized there was a couple making love out on the lawn. Then he noticed another couple over behind a tree. Then another couple behind some bushes by the house. He walked up to the door of the house, and knocked. A well dressed woman answered the door, and the man asked what kind of a place this was. "This is a brothel" replied the madam. "Well, what's all this out on the lawn?" queried the man. "Oh, we're having a yard sale today.
  36. 1 point
    Here's the University of Dayton's article about what 63-7872 is doing - it's being used to help the USAF keep these old planes such as the C-130, KC-135, B-52, C-5, etc... keep on going, keep on flying - https://udayton.edu/blogs/udri/19-05-15-c-130.php?fbclid=IwAR2Tct-lxjH2IWCXLTHuA0Hce8GTf9hFdgKHs9PXuat3rxSCllhwMIcQwTU#.XNwVlM4SDmg.twitter
  37. 1 point
    That you Festus? Condolences for your brother
  38. 1 point
    I would like to wish a Happy Mothers Day to all the Mothers alive and that have gone to there Reward!!
  39. 1 point
    That's exactly what I was looking for Mr N1dp. DC Selsyn. Thanks for the link!
  40. 1 point
    While there was only 5 of us on the crew it took thousands to get is in and keep us in the air. I want to thank all the Crew Chiefs that made sure we had a good airplane each day. They stayed as log as it took to get the airplane back in the "Green". Thanks to all the MX guys that fixed the planes we "broke". The fuelers that topped us off. The list goes on forever. For ever one of us that had wings there was 50,000 to support us. I especially want to thank the great Pilots that brought me home every night. I was 19 and thought these guys were old men..Most were in their late 20s. Happy veterans day to all of you.
  41. 1 point
    Thanks Billy, and thanks for your service also! I was a crew chief for 31 months in Viet Nam, and a crew member- Loadmaster/Flare Kicker for three months, 40 missions in Blind Bats out of Ubon. I know the feeling of going out to my designated plane for the night knowing I was in a plane pre - flighted by one of my peers. My crew never experienced any aborts or breakdowns on any of the 40 missions. By the way, my crew picture is in my gallery! I hope every one of you guys experience a nice day, Ken
  42. 1 point
    A man is waiting for wife to give birth. The doctor comes in and informs the dad that his son was born without torso, arms or legs. The son is just a head! But the father loves his son and raises him as well as he can, with love and compassion. After 21 years, the son is old enough for his first drink. Dad takes him to the bar and tearfully tells the son he is proud of him. Dad orders up the biggest, strongest drink for his boy. With all the bar patrons looking on curiously and the bartender shaking his head in disbelief, the boy takes his first sip of alcohol. Swoooop! A torso pops out! The bar is dead silent; then bursts into a whoop of joy. The father, shocked, begs his son to drink again. The patrons chant "Take another drink!" The bartender still shakes his head in dismay. Swoooop! Two arms pops out. The bar goes wild, but the bartender is clearly disapproving. The father, crying and wailing, begs his son to drink again. The patrons chant "Take another drink!" The bartender ignores the whole affair. By now the boy is getting tipsy, and with his new hands he reaches down, grabs his drink and guzzles the last of it. Swoooop! Two legs pop out. The bar is in chaos. The father falls to his knees and tearfully thanks God. The boy stands up on his new legs and stumbles to the left... then to the right... right through the front door, into the street, where a truck runs over him and kills him instantly. The bar falls silent. The father moans in grief. The bartender sighs and says, "That boy should have quit while he was a head."
  43. 1 point
    Manual Override Control. The flow control and shutoff valve contains a manual override feature. It allows continued operation of the 30 pounds per minute schedule or shutoff schedule in case the solenoid malfunctions.
  44. 1 point
    Three buddies die in a car crash, and they go to heaven to an orientation. They are all asked, "When you are in your casket and friends and family are mourning upon you, what would you like to hear them say about you? The first guy says, "I would like to hear them say that I was a great doctor of my time, and a great family man." The second guy says, "I would like to hear that I was a wonderful husband and school teacher which made a huge difference in our children of tomorrow." The last guy replies, "I would like to hear them say, "Look! He's moving!"
  45. 1 point
    That is an amazing story. I got out of SEA in late 1971. It was pretty calm at that time. Mostly flying MAX PAX and general runs. Very few dirt strips in our missions. I thought we had the war won. Actually we did until politics made us quit. Not long after I got back to LRAFB maybe early spring, I was asked to Crew a ferry flight back to CCK to deliver a plane from the 62nd. They need aircraft. I guess many were getting shot up then. Right after we got back from CCK they asked for volunteers to come back 90 day TDY to take a bunch of planes back and fly the line for a couple of months. It took me less than a second to say no. I knew why they needed planes and crews and I wanted no part of it. I was short, only 6 months to go...I am still amazed that He kept this plane from cart wheeling and killing everybody. He was 28 years old. Most of my Acs were under 30. I saw them as old men as I was 20. I hope he gets the CMH as we never got one in the C-130 groups.
  46. 1 point
    Thanks Casey, I knew you would know what to do! Looking at the birthdays everyday is one of the ways I check to see if more of my old friends could possibly be visitors or members. Also that keeps me informed on what's going on in the C-130 world. Thanks for all of your time, Ken
  47. 1 point
    I was at CCK when the crash occurred. The loadmaster, Frank Wilson was a buddy and ran with our group. The plane hit a mountain in a remote area leaving TPE. I doubt you can get to the site. It was on a mountain side. Any one of us could have been on that crew but were not. We all had one thing in common. We loved to fly and would go anywhere at any time. All of us crew members were Brothers. Good luck to you in finding the location.
  48. 1 point
    My roommate, Sgt, Bob Malott, was the Crew Chief on 57-0472 in '68. I have a couple of pictures of her with bullet holes somewhere.
  49. 1 point
    Replace the pressure control mounted on OH Munir Abbasi
  50. 1 point
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