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  1. Being very late in this conversation, I don't know if this has any bearing any longer, but as son of Lars I inherited printings for another forty or so copies of the very last issue (30th). They are now assembled and could be sent for the cost of post and package, just like my father did.
    4 points
  2. Hanging in here, much like everyone else. Beginning to show signs of cabin fever. And bored like other guys here. Have been to the supermarket twice, and over my wife's objection, took my car to the shop. We're following the rules to the letter. Took the worst ass chewing ever from my wife for failing to maintain personal distance. 😡 Think she would have made a great TI.
    3 points
  3. Doing house stuff, building up the 302 for my Ranchero.
    3 points
  4. Hello: That design of the door is because of the space the wheel need to go up and down without get stuck. If you go to the emergency and abnormal procedures section of the flight manual, Main Landing gear Extension After Normal and Emergency System Failure, one note say this: Extend the Aft strut firt. The main landing gear doors are opened by a mechanical connection to the aft strut, and damage to the doors could result if the forward strut is extended firt. If the door don't have that shape the wheel would get stuck.
    3 points
  5. This is my grandson Charlie in front of a new C-130J He said this is for Papaw!!
    3 points
  6. On this day in 1954, marked the first flight of the C-130 Hercules! Some interesting history from Wikipedia: Background and requirements The Korean War showed that World War II-era piston-engine transports—Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcars, Douglas C-47 Skytrains and Curtiss C-46 Commandos—were no longer adequate. Thus, on 2 February 1951, the United States Air Force issued a General Operating Requirement (GOR) for a new transport to Boeing, Douglas, Fairchild, Lockheed, Martin, Chase Aircraft, North American, Northrop, and Airlifts Inc. The new transport would have a capacity of 92 passengers, 72 combat troops or 64 paratroopers in a cargo compartment that was approximately 41 feet (12 m) long, 9 feet (2.7 m) high, and 10 feet (3.0 m) wide. Unlike transports derived from passenger airliners, it was to be designed specifically as a combat transport with loading from a hinged loading ramp at the rear of the fuselage. A key feature was the introduction of the Allison T56 turboprop powerplant, which was developed for the C-130. At the time, the turboprop was a new application of gas turbines, which offered greater range at propeller-driven speeds compared to pure turbojets, which were faster but consumed more fuel. They also produced much more power for their weight than piston engines. Design phase The Hercules resembled a larger four-engine brother to the C-123 Provider with a similar wing and cargo ramp layout that evolved from the Chase XCG-20 Avitruc, which in turn, was first designed and flown as a cargo glider in 1947.[5] The Boeing C-97 Stratofreighter also had a rear ramp, which made it possible to drive vehicles onto the plane (also possible with forward ramp on a C-124). The ramp on the Hercules was also used to airdrop cargo, which included low-altitude extraction for Sheridan tanks and even dropping large improvised "daisy cutter" bombs. The new Lockheed cargo plane design possessed a range of 1,100 nmi (1,270 mi; 2,040 km), takeoff capability from short and unprepared strips, and the ability to fly with one engine shut down. Fairchild, North American, Martin, and Northrop declined to participate. The remaining five companies tendered a total of ten designs: Lockheed two, Boeing one, Chase three, Douglas three, and Airlifts Inc. one. The contest was a close affair between the lighter of the two Lockheed (preliminary project designation L-206) proposals and a four-turboprop Douglas design. The Lockheed design team was led by Willis Hawkins, starting with a 130-page proposal for the Lockheed L-206.[6]Hall Hibbard, Lockheed vice president and chief engineer, saw the proposal and directed it to Kelly Johnson, who did not care for the low-speed, unarmed aircraft, and remarked, "If you sign that letter, you will destroy the Lockheed Company."[6] Both Hibbard and Johnson signed the proposal and the company won the contract for the now-designated Model 82 on 2 July 1951.[7] The first flight of the YC-130 prototype was made on 23 August 1954 from the Lockheed plant in Burbank, California. The aircraft, serial number 53-3397, was the second prototype, but the first of the two to fly. The YC-130 was piloted by Stanley Beltz and Roy Wimmer on its 61-minute flight to Edwards Air Force Base; Jack Real and Dick Stanton served as flight engineers. Kelly Johnson flew chase in a Lockheed P2V Neptune.[8] After the two prototypes were completed, production began in Marietta, Georgia, where over 2,300 C-130s have been built through 2009.[9] The initial production model, the C-130A, was powered by Allison T56-A-9 turboprops with three-blade propellers and originally equipped with the blunt nose of the prototypes. Deliveries began in December 1956, continuing until the introduction of the C-130B model in 1959. Some A-models were equipped with skis and re-designated C-130D. As the C-130A became operational with Tactical Air Command (TAC), the C-130's lack of range became apparent and additional fuel capacity was added with wing pylon-mounted tanks outboard of the engines; this added 6,000 lb of fuel capacity for a total capacity of 40,000 lb.
    3 points
  7. First question is what year/model? Yes it matters if its a B-model verse a mid 80s H-model. Ground test valve commonly considered bad for transfers and to be honest it almost never is. Check the rigging to the ground test valve. It should be tighter on one cable verse the other so that the valve wants to pull to the closed position. The incorrect rigging of the cable is much more common than a valve itself. Check the brake shuttle valves. These can transfer aux to utility and utility to aux when brakes are used. They should not allow fluid to flow through them once they shift to other side of shuttle. A strange one that I have seen is one of the brake selector valves not receiving power to close so both valves were open and causing util/aux brake pressure to fight at the shuttle valves. Its easy to check. They are powered close so when energency is selected, you should have 28 vdc on normal selector and opposited when normal is selected. Nose landing gear uplock, NLG actuator and nose gear emergency selector valve can also cause this. Not too common but I have seen it. Do you have UARRSI, refuel pods or weapons systems? If so, all of those can be points of transfer. Emergency brake and normal brake accumulators should be checked for internal leakage as well. Most common of all is a person not fully depleting brake pressure on BOTH normal/emergency before moving the ground test. There is always some avionics or electrics guy that wants to help but doesnt know the details of running hydraulics. I have seen people chase this ghost and come to find out the new guy was improperly trained on tying ground test.
    2 points
  8. Hello fellow Herk lovers. It's been a long time since I last checked in. A few years in fact. Had some health problems to deal with and of course the day to day grind. I'm not real sure if this is the proper place for this "homecoming", but I'm sure it will get moved if need be. I scrolled around a bit before signing in and noticed a few names still left from the old days. I did not see MT Crewchief or gizzard, although over the past few years I have been in personal contact with both of them as well as lee Sills. I made the trip out to Montana several times and Ken and I have become good friends. Same thing with Paul, out East. He and his wife traveled to Wisconsin a couple years ago. Our two families have become close friends. Thanks to this forum !! I plan on spending time here, and getting caught up...
    2 points
  9. A man is dining in a fancy restaurant, and there is a gorgeous redhead sitting at the next table. He had been checking her out since he sat down, but lacked the nerve to talk with her. Suddenly she sneezes and her glass eye comes flying out of its socket towards the man. He reflexively reaches out, grabs it out of the air, and hands it back. "Oh my, I am so sorry," the woman says as she pops her eye back in place. "Let me buy you dessert to make it up to you." They enjoy a wonderful dessert together, and afterwards, the woman invites him to the theater followed by drinks. After paying for everything, she asks him if he would like to come to her place for a nightcap...and stay for breakfast the next morning. The next morning, she cooks a gourmet meal with all the trimmings. The guy is amazed! Everything has been incredible! "You know," he said, "you are the perfect woman. Are you this nice to every guy you meet?" "No," she replies... ... "You just happened to catch my eye
    2 points
  10. Excel file I made some time ago, performance accurate to about 0.2% most of the time. Perf PPC v2.1.xlsx
    2 points
  11. Lost my uncle, Pfc Lewis Radcliffe on June 17, 1944 KIA during this invasion. Was able to visit Normandy in 1995 and find his grave which no family member had ever visited. I was there with my C-130 unit to honor D Day and ten of my maint. troops went with me to his grave. They were all in uniform and in formation and we had a ceremony where we refolded his flag over his grave. Very sober moment. Bill
    2 points
  12. Its so you can check your hair and your shades before stepping out the crew entrance door.
    2 points
  13. Just found this while messing around on computer. Since I was one of the loadmasters I want to say these are four of the most wonderful guys that I'm proud to call them my "Brothers" Ralph Bemis.
    2 points
  14. Back to work yesterday, all is still well in the land of sand. People obeying the curfew, and while the infection rate may be troubling, situation is under control. Government doing a sterling job of getting a handle on the virus, getting free medical treatment for all, online distance learning for schools, partial salaries guarenteed for companies that had to close.
    2 points
  15. Staying in, doing honey -dos, cleaning out stuff. Good time to do spring cleaning. Can't do much else, can't go to the Air Museum to work. Better days ahead😄
    2 points
  16. While CBs and fuses essentially "do" the same thing (limit current) the way they do it and the response to overcurrent are different. Generally, Fuses react faster than CBs to overcurrent situations. The component they (CB/Fuse) supply power to determines what type of protection they need. In this case the TQ and TIT Cbs feed 155VAC to power supplies/amplifiers while the fuses provide 26VAC to drive pressure transmitters and gauges without separate internal power supplies.
    2 points
  17. I remember being in awe of you Loadmasters hustling around all over the cargo compartment putting on and tightening straps while I was thinking I was helping you while trying to make one strap work! I got better as time went on, but I learned to stay out of your way when in-country and time was of essence! I have been wanting to say that for a long time! Ken
    2 points
  18. I wish I had a nickle for every strap I ever tightened down. I even got three or four surplus straps to tie equipment down on my trailer. I do put the equipment CG just slightly forward of the tandem axle center, but no, I do not make out a Form F every time I load the trailer.
    2 points
  19. Hope all of you have a nice Thanksgiving Day. And many more! Ken
    2 points
  20. I have to agree with Ken, Hope all you Herc guys a happy Thanksgiving and many more! November 1968 Chow Hall in Monsoon weather Naha Okinawa the first of what my calender was telling me 2 more to goafter this one. Little did I know the next year and a half would be spent in places like Ubon, Soc Trang, Bien How, Pleiku, Phu Cat ! Would do it all over again just to hang with all the magnificent Band Of Brothers I met along the way! Feb 68 -Mar 09!
    2 points
  21. Very Cool. All indications are that the C-130 will be around for many years to come. Maybe he will fly or maintain one in the future.
    2 points
  22. If the orifice cups are clogged, you will never be able to accurately check servicing, as the pressurized sump may always show good, but at the expense of the atmospheric sump. The atmospheric sump is allegedly the most accurate location, so if it's inaccurate, it will always lie to you. You should check your tech data for how to clean the orifice cups. The only other option is to replace the pitchlock regulator, preferably with one that was recently overhauled to guarantee the cups are clean. One indication the orifice cups are clogged is that, when you check the pressurized sump after 2 minutes, the fluid fills up and overflows. This is due to the pitchlock regulator keeping the fluid pressurized in the system instead of draining the fluid into the barrel like it's supposed to. Be careful of those who tell you only the pressurized sump is required for an accurate fluid check. This comes from the idea that the pressurized sump dipstick actually gives you a quantity, and the atmospheric sump is only a go/no-go. The only thing the pressurized sump dipstick tells you is how much fluid is in the pressurized sump, who's job is to force-feed the pumps sending the fluid out to the valvehousing. The atmospheric sump dipstick tells you how much is in the barrel AND atmospheric sump. If there's nothing on the atmospheric dipstick, you have no idea how much is in the barrel, and that can be dangerous.
    2 points
  23. The AC-130J's arrival in Afghanistan marks a historic changing of the guard as older AC-130Us have now finished their last scheduled deployment. By Joseph TrevithickJuly 10, 2019 The U.S. Air Force's new AC-130J Ghostriders have been flying combat missions in Afghanistan since June 2019. The gunships took over from AC-130U Spooky IIs that had been supporting U.S. and coalition special operations forces and their Afghan partners in that country. Those Spooky IIs have now returned to the United States, marking the last scheduled combat deployment ever for that version of the AC-130. Northwest Florida Daily News had been the first to report on June 28, 2019, that the AC-130J had flown its first-ever combat mission in Afghanistan. This detail had emerged during a change of command ceremony at Hurlburt Field in Florida, during which U.S. Air Force Lieutenant General James Slife took charge of Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) from Lieutenant General Brad Webb. The Ghostrider's first combat sortie had taken place "just days before," according to the story. "We are pleased to announce the AC-130J has deployed in support of combat operations overseas," U.S. Air Force Captain Keavy Rake, an AFSOC spokesperson, confirmed to The War Zone in an Email on July 10, 2019. "The first AC-130Js deployed in late June 2019 to relieve the AC-130Us, who arrived home to Hurlburt Field on 8 July 2019." The Air Force declared that the AC-130J had reached initial operational capability in late 2017, with the 73rd Special Operation Squadron at Hurlburt Field becoming the first operational unit to fly the aircraft in 2018. The 73rd is the squadron presently flying the Ghostriders over Afghanistan. AC-130Js had previously taken part in a number of exercises in the United States and abroad. We don't know much about the 73rd's initial deployment with the Ghostrider yet, but AFSOC's AC-130s most often fly at night, supporting special operations forces on the ground, either providing direct close air support or armed overwatch during their operations. U.S. special operators remain heavily engaged in Afghanistan, against the Taliban and a variety of other terrorist and militant groups, including an ISIS-linked faction that first emerged in 2015. In the past, AC-130s have also conducted targeted strikes against specific individuals in support of the secretive Joint Special Operations Command's task forces in the country. An AC-130U from the 4th Special Operations Squadron was also notably involved in the infamous mistaken strike against a Doctors Without Borders hospital in the Afghan city of Kunduz in 2015. A subsequent investigation revealed a number of equipment failures and human errors that led to the tragedy. The 4th SOS is the last squadron to fly the U-model, including the ones that just returned home this week. It will continue to keep some of those aircraft available for unscheduled contingency deployments until its full complement of AC-130Js has arrived, according to Military.com. The squadron received its first Ghostrider in March 2019. The last Ghostrider deliveries are scheduled to occur in 2021 and the Air Force plans to eventually have a fleet of 37 of the aircraft in total, which will replace all of the remaining AC-130Us and AC-130W Stinger II gunships. As of March 2019, AFSOC had already retired seven of the 10 remaining U models and three of the 12 W variants, according to Pentagon budget documents. The service already retired the last of the AC-130H Spectre gunships in 2016. The deployment of the AC-130Js and the end of scheduled combat operations for the AC-130Us very much marks a shift in AFSOC's gunship operations, as well. The Spooky IIs, which entered service in 1995, are the last of the Air Force's old school AC-130 gunships with a five-barrel 25mm GAU-12/U Gatling cannon, a single-barrel 40mm Bofors cannon, and a 105mm howitzer as their only armament. These aircraft were a direct evolution of the original Vietnam War-era AC-130s. By all indications, the AC-130Us are also the last platform of any kind in the U.S. military to use the 40mm Bofors gun, a World War II-era weapon, which proved to be a deadly aerial weapon, but also increasingly hard to operate and maintain. The Air Force had found itself scouring the world for spare parts in the early 2000s and rebuilding 40mm ammunition from the 1940s in recent years to keep the guns operational. Clemens Vasters via Wikimedia A close up of the 40mm Bofors cannon, at left, and its 105mm howitzer, at right on an AC-130H Spectre gunship. The AC-130U has a similar configuration. The AC-130J is a very different beast, though it does have the same 105mm howitzer as the AC-130U, as well as a smaller 30mm GAU-23/A Bushmaster cannon. But the Ghostrider, from the very beginning, was designed to also employ precision-guided munitions, including the AGM-114 Hellfire missile, the GBU-39/B Small Diameter Bomb (SDB), the GBU-44/B Viper Strike glide bomb, and the AGM-176 Griffin, which can function as a powered missile or as an unpowered glide bomb. The AC-130Ws, which are conversions of older C-130H cargo aircraft, have a virtually identical armament package. The Air Force had not even originally planned to install the 105mm howitzer on the AC-130J, or the AC-130W, but eventually changed course. AFSOC took delivery of the first Block 20 AC-130J with the howitzer in 2016. There had also been concerns about the functionality of the Ghostrider's 30mm GAU-23/A, but these issues have all since been resolved, according to the Pentagon's Office of the Director of Operational Test and Evaluation. The precision-guided munitions capability has really added a new dimension to the gunship's capabilities, giving it more stand-off reach and the ability to engage targets in multiple distinct areas simultaneously, something you can read about in more detail here. The addition of new weapons in the future, including the GBU-53/B Stormbreaker, previously known as the Small Diameter Bomb II, and the GBU-69/B Small Glide Munition, both of which have multi-mode guidance systems, will only increase the AC-130J's flexibility. With its 30mm and 105mm weapons, the Ghostriders can also still provide the same kind of extremely precise direct fire support as their predecessors. The AC-130Js are also packed with a variety of updated sensors, data links, communications systems, and more, and the Air Force is already in the process of further updating those systems. The latest Block 30 Ghostriders, which the 4th Special Operations Squadron began receiving in March, feature a number of improvements over the Block 20 aircraft that the 73rd Special Operations Squadron is flying in Afghanistan now. This includes upgraded sensor turrets with higher fidelity electro-optical and infrared full-motion video cameras and a new, large broadband satellite communications "hump" on top of the forward fuselage. The Air Force is looking to improve the survivability of all of its remaining gunships against newly emerging threats, such as GPS jamming, too. In 2018, U.S. Army General Raymond Thomas, then head of U.S. Special Operations Command, said that unspecified opponents – most likely Russian or Russian-backed forces – were using electronic warfare attacks against gunships operating over Syria. Entirely new capabilities might find their way onto the Ghostriders as time goes on, too. AFSOC is planning to demonstrate a high-energy laser weapon on one of its AC-130Js in 2022. But with no more AC-130U deployments on the schedule and AC-130Js now flying combat missions, the Air Force has already entered a new era of gunship operations.
    2 points
  24. Is this guy reminiscing about engine runs?
    2 points
  25. Hercinherit, I have a hand written letter signed by your dad that he sent along with an unbound 30th edition, which I had bound. If you would like the letter just PM me your address to this website. I thought a lot of Lars and how much he meant to the C-130 community. RIP Lars. Bill
    2 points
  26. What is everyone doing this memorial day I will be doing a honor guard at Macon Memorial Park. Macon Ga.!! We have to honor are fallen who gave their all!!
    2 points
  27. This is correction of TIT 15 to 60 °c not a cut back its miss consecpt.as per 1c-130B-2-4CL-1. But new JG 1c-130H-2-71JG-00-1 having no 15 to 60°c limit its only 800 to 840 limit of cross over TIT no correction mentioned here.
    2 points
  28. You're welcome. I retire 1 Oct. I certainly miss Bob he was a good friend and a member of the C-130 community. --Casey
    2 points
  29. The forum will not allow me to post the news clipping pages. You can find the news clippings from the Doc Jensen Story at : http://www.tanwater.com/834/det1-pg4.html And http://www.tanwater.com/834/det1-pg5.html I can testify to the fact that every plane over An Loc came back with bullet holes. I was there. Saved these news clippings from the Det 1 Report. These 2 pages were on Doc Jensen story. Other news clippings I saved are at - http://www.tanwater.com/834/dex2.html#line3
    2 points
  30. I flew with an old A-model captain when I was an FE with Transafrik in Angola. He enjoyed telling the story of departing somewhere in the very cold icy north. The funny thing is that he departed with the parking brake set and when he landed at Pope AFB (I think), he blew all 4 mains! Before you ask about the anti-skid light, I also asked that question. He said the early A-models had no anti-skid inoperative light. Some of you old heads may remember Bonzo Von Haven -- a legend in the Herc world. Don R.
    2 points
  31. These aren't Murphy's Laws but some of them should be: "The Law of Volunteering"--If you dance with a grizzly bear, you had better let him lead. "The Law of Avoiding Oversell"--When putting cheese in a mousetrap, always leave room for the mouse. "The Law of Common Sense" --Never accept a drink from a urologist. "The Law of Reality" --Never get into fights with ugly people, they have nothing to lose. "The Law of Self Sacrifice" --When you starve with a tiger, the tiger starves last. "The Law of Motivation" --Creativity is great, but plagiarism is faster. "Dick's Law" --You always find something in the last place you look. "Weiler's Law" --Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself. "Law of Probable Dispersal" --Whatever hits the fan will not be evenly distributed. "Law of Volunteer Labor" --People are always available for work in the past tense. "Conway's Law" --In any organization there is one person who knows what is going on. That person must be fired. "Iron Law of Distribution" --Them that has, gets. "Law of Cybernetic Entomology" --There is always one more bug. "Law of Drunkenness" --You can't fall off the floor. "Peter's Law" --The first myth of management is that it exists. "Osborne's Law" --Variables won't; constants aren't. "Main's Law" --For every action there is an equal and opposite government program. "Weinberg's Second Law" --If builders built buildings the way programmers wrote programs, then the first woodpecker that came along would have destroyed civilization.
    1 point
  32. The website from above 005 or rather "BALLS 5" as we called her at Naha back in 68 to 70 before she joined the Vietnamese Air Force. Spent a lot of hours changing generators paralleling generators all kinds of electrical stuff. Im sure Sonny, Bill Goodall and Dennis Byrne and Ed Hubrich also have a lot of found memories of all the "BALLS" tail numbers we had 002-004-005-006 CRS stops me from remembering if I forgot any I do believe they were all 55 series "A" models but could have been 56, I know CRS- Great memories of Brothers from a place and a war so long ago and so far far away!
    1 point
  33. DISCLOSURE NOTICE - This information is furnished upon the condition that it will not be released to another nation without the specific authority of the Department of the Air Force of the United States, that it will be used for military purposes only, that individual or corporate rights originating in the information, whether patented or not, will be respected, that the recipient will report promptly to the United States, any known or suspected compromise, and that the information will be provided substantially the same degree of security afforded it by the Department of Defense of the United States. Also, regardless of any other markings on the document, it will not be downgraded or declassified without written approval of the originating United States agency. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT C - Distribution authorized to U.S. Government agencies and their contractors (Administrative or Operational Use) (24 November 1998). Other requests for this document shall be referred to 580 ACSG/GFEAH, Robins AFB, GA 31098. WARNING - This document contains technical data whose export is restricted by the Arms Export Control Act (Title 22, U.S.C., Sec 2751, et seq.) or the Export Administration Act of 1979, as amended, Title 50, U.S.C., App. 2401 et seq. Violations of these export laws are subject to severe criminal penalties. Disseminate in accordance with provisions of DoD Directive 5230.25.
    1 point
  34. Aircrew assigned to the 189th Operations Group flew to Abbottsford, Canada, Oct. 5, 2019, to participate in the annual Girls Fly Too, Women in Aviation symposium. The all-female crew, including pilots Lt. Col. Kenda Garrett and Maj. Janelle Guillebeau, navigator Lt. Col. Sarah O’Banion, flight engineer Master Sgt. Erin Evans, and loadmasters Tech. Sgt. Nicole Beck and Senior Airman Ashlyn Hendrickson stopped in Colorado Springs on the way up to Canada and picked up the Wings of Blue female jump team along with their jump master and staff. Along with the aircrew, Staff Sgt. Tracie Winston and Staff Sgt. Jessica McGilton, two crew chiefs from the 189th Maintenance Group, accompanied the crew to provide maintenance if necessary. “The jump was challenging,” said Lt. Col. Sarah O’Banion, a 189th navigator and Chief of Safety. “I gotta say, though, we had an awesome all-female 189th Herk crew. We were able to get them at their minimum altitude of 2,500 feet and drop the jump team at their target.” The 189th OG does not have many female aviators in the unit, however, the group was able to gather one full crew to accomplish the mission with their crew chief Staff Sgt. Jessica McGilton, of the 189th Maintenance Group. In a predominately male-oriented career field, the representation of female aviators was created to inspire future female aviatrix. Female aviators, while somewhat commonplace now, were almost unheard of during the early days of aviation. Pioneering women from Amelia Earhart, who was the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, to Brig. Gen. Jeannie Marie Leavitt, the first female fighter pilot in the United States Armed Forces, has established a firm base for young girls who have a dream of flying. During the event, O’Banion expressed that she wanted the young girls attending the event to realize that they are capable of doing anything they want if they are passionate about their dream and put their minds to it. “It was neat seeing a variety of not just girls and their brothers, but a lot of girls who were interested in what we do,” said O’Banion. “It’s not so much of a diversity thing but it employs the fact that they’re seeing women do jobs as normalcy within a male-centric career field. I hope the girls that came out here see us doing this job and realize that it’s not just a male-oriented career field; it’s something that anyone can achieve if they’re passionate about it.” Until World War II, women in the U.S. were barred from flying for the military. During this time the only women pilots that were allowed to fly for the military were civilians known as the Women’s Auxiliary Ferry Squadron also know as WAFS and others representing the Women Air Force Service Pilots or WASP. In Fall of 1942, twenty-eight women aviators were officially designated as WAFS or WASP, earning their civilian pilot training wings at government expense through the civilian pilot training programs at different colleges throughout the U.S. Although this transition was a huge step for women in aviation, it was not until 1970s, during the women’s movement, that females became official military aviators. At present, approximately six percent of the Air Force aviation community is female. Through the hard work, dedication, courage and military training, U.S. military women aviators continue to achieve air equality in the military. Aircrew assigned to the 189th Operations Group flew to Abbottsford, Canada, Oct. 5, 2019, to participate in the annual Girls Fly Too, Women in Aviation symposium. The all-female crew, including pilots Lt. Col. Kenda Garrett and Maj. Janelle Guillebeau, navigator Lt. Col. Sarah O’Banion, flight engineer Master Sgt. Erin Evans, and loadmasters Tech. Sgt. Nicole Beck and Senior Airman Ashlyn Hendrickson stopped in Colorado Springs on the way up to Canada and picked up the Wings of Blue female jump team along with their jump master and staff. Along with the aircrew, Staff Sgt. Tracie Winston and Staff Sgt. Jessica McGilton, two crew chiefs from the 189th Maintenance Group, accompanied the crew to provide maintenance if necessary. Source: https://www.189aw.ang.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/2000585/all-female-c-130h-crew-participates-in-international-air-show/ View full record
    1 point
  35. I know, I know, I have mentioned this booklet several or more times over the years. Anyway, I finally found it and made a copy of the front and back covers. I am not able to copy the inside pages without taking all of it apart. So, here is what it looked like, and I guess I must have bought it at a BX on base. Probably the Flightline BX. All of the book doesn't pertain to all of us, but I am willing to bet it will bring back memories. If any of you guys have a good way of putting together some more books, let me know. The two pictures I am posting are just the front and back of the book. I have been calling it the Naminoue Capers incorrectly! Let me know if you have one of these. I Can't be the only one can I? Thanks for looking, Ken
    1 point
  36. One winter morning, an employee explained why he had shown up for work 50 minutes late: “It was so slippery out that for every step I took ahead, I slipped back two.” The boss eyed him suspiciously, “Oh, yeah? Then how did you ever get here?” “I finally gave up,” he said, “and started for home.”
    1 point
  37. Hello- one of our aircraft, at #2 prop, I always find atmospheric sump empty that means I don't find any touch of Hyd with Dipstick when SVC propeller. On the other hand pressurized sump remain full. It is very confusing for me. Any one can tell me why this happen? What is other best and easy way to check Hyd level except atmospheric sump? Thanks
    1 point
  38. Now wait a minute! I served my time (18 months) at Naha, before I got a consecutive overseas tour to CCK (15 months.) Without a leave also.! Thirty three months of "you numbah ten GI" . Barry (f4enut) knows what he is talking about---The 21st. was okay, but the 35th had superior personnel. Although I am still jealous of Sonny for being able to go AWOL in South Viet Nam with the Navy. And he got away with it!!! Sonny, if you get the time, re-tell that story. With pictures! You know I wish we had all known each other when we were there! Oh well, it looks like we all still have our memories and are able to share them. I do know I would do it all over again. Take care , Ken
    1 point
  39. A large woman, wearing a sleeveless sun dress, walked into a bar in London. She raised her right arm, revealing a huge, hairy armpit as she pointed to all the people sitting at the bar and asked, What man here will buy a lady a drink? The bar went silent as the patrons tried to ignore her. But down at the end of the bar, an owly-eyed drunk slammed his hand down on the counter and bellowed, Give the ballerina a drink! The bartender poured the drink and the woman chugged it down. She turned to the patrons and again pointed around at all of them, revealing the same hairy armpit, and asked, What man here will buy a lady a drink? Once again, the same little drunk slapped his money down on the bar and said, Give the ballerina another drink! The bartender approached the little drunk and said, I say, old chap, it's your business if you want to buy the lady a drink, but why do you keep calling her the ballerina? As far as I'm concerned, the drunk replied, any woman who can lift her leg that high has got to be a ballerina!
    1 point
  40. Ponderings: How come you press harder on a remote-control when you know the battery is dead? Have you ever imagined a world with no hypothetical situations? You know how most packages say "Open here".What is the protocol if the package says, "Open somewhere else"? Since Americans throw rice at weddings do orientals throw hamburgers? Why are they called buildings, when they're already finished? Shouldn't they be called builts? Why are they called apartments, when they're all stuck together? Why do people without out a watch look at their wrist when you ask them what time it is? Why do you ask someone without a watch what time it is? Who is General failure and why is he reading my disk ? The light went out, but where to ? Why do banks charge you a "non-sufficient funds fee" on money they already know you don't have? Why is it you have a "pair" of pants and only one bra? How come when I call Information they can't tell me where my keys are? Why do people go to Burger King and Order a Double Whopper with a Large French Fry and insist on getting a Diet Coke? Does the reverse side also have a reverse side? Why is the alphabet in that order? If the universe is everything, and scientists say that the universe is expanding, what is it expanding into? If you got into a taxi and he started driving backwards, would the taxi driver end up owing you money?
    1 point
  41. Happy christmas day to every world hercules member Munir Abbasi on behalf of Muslim community of Pakistan
    1 point
  42. Search "Surfin' South Sudan" on YouTube. That's how they do it in the commercial world. That reporter would've gone nuts over that! Don R.
    1 point
  43. Good one Sonny! Merry Christmas to you and all of you forum members (and lurkers)! Ken
    1 point
  44. I don't have enough info at my fingertips to give a firm yes, I wish I did. It looks good, but have you contacted FMS at WRALC?
    1 point
  45. An 80-year-old Texas rancher goes to the Mayo clinic in Rochester for a check-up. The doctor is amazed at what good shape the guy is in and asks, 'How do you stay in such great physical condition?' 'I'm from Texas and in my spare time I like to hunt and fish' says the old guy, 'and that's why I'm In such good shape. I'm up well before daylight riding herd and mending fences and when I'm not doing that, I'm out hunting or fishing. In the evening, I have a beer and all is well.' 'Well' says the doctor, 'I'm sure that helps, but there's got to be more to it. How old was your father when he died?' 'Who said my father's dead?' The doctor is amazed. 'You mean you're 80 years old and your father's still alive? How old is he?' 'He's 100 years old,' says the old Texan. 'In fact he worked with and hunted with me this morning, and then we went to the topless bar for a while and had some beer and that's why he's still alive. He's a Texas rancher and he's a hunter and fisherman too.' 'Well,' the doctor says, 'that's great, but I'm sure there's more to it than that. How about your father's father? How old was he when he died?' 'Who said my Grandpa's dead?' Stunned, the doctor asks, 'you mean you're 80 years old and your grandfather's' still alive?' 'He's 118 years old,' says the man. The doctor is getting frustrated at this point, 'So, I guess he went hunting with you this morning too?' 'No, Grandpa couldn't go this morning because he's getting married today.' At this point the doctor is close to losing it. 'Getting married!! Why would a 118 year-old guy want to get married?' 'Who said he wanted to?'
    1 point
  46. Just thought of a name some of you might remember him from Naha in 67 and 68. Maybe 69 also. He was a NCO in the 780 Section during that time frame. I graduated from high school with him in 1964 and ran into him again at my first roll call with Msgt. Haskell in Sept. 1967. He was walking by and saw me standing in the group of guys. We had not seen each other since graduation and neither of us had any idea the other was there! I thought he was in the Navy! I talked with him on the phone the other night and told him about this forum. Hopefully he will check us out. Ken .
    1 point
  47. The Plan In the beginning was the Plan. And then came the Assumptions. And the Assumptions were without form. And the Plan was without substance. And darkness was upon the face of the Workers. And they spoke among themselves, saying, "It is a crock of s%@#, and it stinks." And the Workers went unto their Supervisors and said, "It is a pail of dung, and we can't live with the smell. And the Supervisors went unto their Managers, saying, "It is the container of the excrements, and it is very strong, such that none may abide by it." And the Mangers went unto their Directors, saying, "It is a vessel of fertilizer, and none may abide its strength." And the Directors spoke among themselves, saying to one another, "It promotes growth, and it is very powerful." And the Vice Presidents went to the President, saying unto him, "This new plan will actively promote the growth and vigor of the company with very powerful effects." And the President looked upon the Plan and saw that it was good. And the Plan became Policy. And that is how s%@# happens.
    1 point
  48. Replace the pressure control mounted on OH Munir Abbasi
    1 point
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